Our database contains over 1,000 newspaper articles that specifically label a group escape as a "slave stampede" or some related variant, such as "negro stampede." Our document records also include hundreds of other types of primary sources and newspaper articles related to these stampedes but that do not contain the word itself. The map below provides a sample visualization of the newspaper coverage between 1856 and 1860 with clickable access to the various records inside our database. The detailed listing underneath includes records for all of the documents from the period 1847 to 1865, containing both transcripts and original images.

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Article

   Telegraphed for the Baltimore Sun

   Washington, May 26--6 P.M

SERIOUS ILLNESS OF SENATOR ELLMORE--CONFIRMATION--SLAVE STAMPEDE

   I regret to inform you that the Hon. Mr. Ellmore, Senator from South Carolina, and successor of the Hon. John C. Calhoun, is not expected to live through the night. His disease is bronchitis, and his case is considered hopeless. 

   Mr. Letcher has been confirmed as Minister to Mexico.

   The abolitionists are at work here. Last night, three domestics in the family of the Hon. Wm. Colcock, of S.C., were spirited away. About twenty slaves have been enticed away from this city and neighborhood.   X.  

Article

   Washington, May 29, 1850. 

   SLAVE STAMPEDE

   The abolitionists are at work here. Last night, three domestics in the family of the Hon. Wm. Colcock, of S.C., were spirited away. About twenty slaves have been enticed away from this city and neighborhood. 

Article

    EDITOR'S CORRESPONDENCE.

  From our Baltimore Correspondent.

              BALTIMORE, June 8––5, p.m.

   Whig Troubles and Disappointments.––Organization of Slaveholders.––Abolition Movements.––The Census-takers.––Troublesome Questions.––The Markets, &c.

Article

MARYLAND SLAVES. A meeting of the slaveholders of Queen Anne's county was held at Centerville a few days since, for the purpose of organizing a society to protect slave property, on account of the numerous depredations that have been made by the abolitionists recently in that vicinity. Officers were elected, and a constitution adopted, and measures taken for immediately commencing operations. The number of slaves weekly lost from the border counties of this State is estimated to be equal to $10,000 in value, and the most efficient organization will be necessary to prevent its increase. That they receive money, arms, and directions from the Abolitionists, there is no manner of doubt; and, after they cross the line, places of concealment are provided for them, with all the 'aid and comfort' necessary to enable them to elude pursuit. The recent stampede of sixteen slaves belonging to Col.

Article

Maryland Slaves. 

   A meeting of the slaveholders of Queen Anne's county was held at Centreville a few days since, for the purpose of organizing a society to protect slave property, on account of the numerous depredations that have been made by the abolitionists recently in that vicinity. Officers were elected and a constitution adopted, and measures taken for immediately commencing operations. 

   The number of slaves weekly lost from the border counties of this state is estimated to be equal to $10,000 in value, and the most efficient organization will be necessary to prevent is increase. That they receive money, arms, and directions from the abolitionists, there is no manner of doubt--and after they cross the line, places of concealment are provided for them, with all the "aid and comfort" necessary to enable them to elude pursuit. 

Article

A Stampede -- The Clearspring (Md.) Sentinel states that eight slaves were seen crossing the mountains west of that [illegible] during the past week. They were all in a gang, and belonged to the citizens of the southern part of Virginia. --- ib.

Article

    STAMPEDE.––The Pittsburg Intelligencer says several slaves, belonging to Messrs. Toombs and Stephens, were enticed off by the abolitionists on Saturday night, the 27th ult. 

Article

SLAVE STAMPEDES.––On our fourth page will be found an account from one of our Washington correspondents, of a slave stampede in Washington, accompanied by quite a serious fight between the runaways and their captors, and the abolition agent, who had them in charge. There will also be found in our local column an account of the capture of another party of runaways at Shrewsbury, Pa.

Article

   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE AND CONFLICT. Baltimore, Aug. 9.––Five runaway slaves were brought here this morning in the Susquehannah cars from Pennsylvania. They were those who had absconded from different counties in this State. It being ascertained that the runaways were secreted in the farm of colored man one mile across the Pennsylvania line, a party proceeded there with a view to the capture of the men.

   They succeeded in arresting seven of them. In passing through Sprattsburgh, some abolitionists, headed by Postmaster Brown, made an attempt at recapture and rescued two of the slaves.

Article

   Another Slave Stampede at Baltimore.-- Seven runaway slaves were re-captured by a party from Baltimore, on Thursday, at a place a mile across the Pennsylvania line. As they were returning with them through Sprattsburgh, some abolitionists made a rush at them, and rescued two of the slaves. After a smart contest in which one of the slaves wounded himself in attempting to shoot his captor, the five were brought to Baltimore in irons. 

Article

Our Baltimore Correspondence

BALTIMORE, August 10, 1850

A Nest of Runaway Slaves Captured by Pennsylvanians -- A Recreant Postmaster - Fruits of Abolitionism - New Underground Railroad - Melancholy Suicide, &c.

The excitement in this vicinity relative to the recent movement of abolitionists, in stampeding slaves, is very great, as large numbers have recently been spirited away.

Article

   INTERESTING SLAVE CASE.––Effect of Slave Stampedes.––The New York Express, in a letter from Washington, details the following incidents, as shewing the effect of improper interference with slave property, as well as the sympathy felt for a faithful and worthy man:

Article

ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE. Baltimore; Aug 9. Five runaway slaves were brought here this morning in the Susquehanna cars from Pennsylvania. The runaways were secreted on the farm of a colored man, one mile across the Pennsylvania line, and a party proceeded there with a view to their capture. They succeeded in arresting seven of them. In passing through Sprattsburgh, some Abolitionists, headed by Postmaster Brown, made an attempt at recapture, and rescued two of the slaves. Mr. Brown was knocked down,

Article

                        Correspondence of the Courier.

                            BALTIMORE, AUG. 10––9 P.M.

   Our city still continues very healthy, but as the cholera is prevailing to somewhat an alarming extent almost in our immediate neighbourhood yet still our city is free from it, prompt measures should be taken by our city authorities and the citizens also to prevent its ravages amongst us, although our city escaped almost by a miracle last year. Latest accounts from Harper's Ferry and Uniontown state the disease has somewhat abated, but that there was a good deal of sickness yet, the greatest excitement prevailed and the inhabitants were leaving for the country. 

   The weather has been delightful to-day, and from the present appearance of the skies, we will in all probability have rain before morning. 

Article

   A Stampede.––The Clearspring, (Md.) Sentinel states that eight slaves were seen crossing the mountains west of that place during the past week. They were all in a gang, and belonged to the citizens of the southern part of Virginia. 

Article

Another Slave Stampede and Conflict.––Baltimore, Aug. 9.––Five runaway Slaves were bro't [brought] here this morning in the Susquehannah cars from Pennsylvania. They were those who had absconded from different counties in this State. It being ascertained that the runaways were secreted on the farm of a colored man one mile across the Pennsylvania line, a party proceeded there with a view to the capture of the men.

They succeeded in arresting seven of them. In passing through Sprattsburg, some abolitionists headed by Postmaster Brown, made an attack at recapture, and rescued two of the Slaves.

Mr. Brown was knocked down, and the five Slaves retained were put in irons and brought to this city, where they were lodged in jail this morning to await the arrival of their owners. One of the slaves in attempting to shoot his captor, wounded himself.

Article

        A large Abolition Convention is being held at Cazenovia, at which upwards of 2000 delegates are present. Fred. Douglass has been elected President. Various resolutions and addresses have been passed, of the usual character, and urging slaves to escaped at all hazards. Subscriptions were set on foot to present a testimonial of approbation to Chaplin, who was concerned in the slave stampede at Washington, and to defend him in his coming trial, for attempting to liberate the slaves of Messrs. Toombs and Stevens.

Article

ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE.--About forty slaves from the vicinity of Prince George's County, absconded on Sunday last, and the pursuit of them has so far proved unsuccessful.

Article

   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE.––It will be seen by our "Mercury" letter from Washington, that the underground railroad is still in active employment by the abolitionists, there having been some 30 or 40 slaves run off from Prince George's county, in this State, in the last few days. If Mr. Pratt's amendments to the fugitive slave bill should pass Congress, by which all the unrecovered stolen or abducted slaves are to be paid for, these things may not then be so frequent, as the Government will then have a more direct interest in checking these unlawful proceedings on the part of certain citizens of free States.––Balt. Sun. 

Article

SLAVE STAMPEDES. In all the Slave States bordering on the Free States, every now and then there is a regular stampede, or an uprising and fleeing from bondage of a large number of slaves, so many and such extensive ones as to render it certain that in several of the States slavery is on the decrease. Every day adds to the depreciating of slave property in all the exposed States, as its tendency to walk off lessens its value greatly. Slavery is dying out in several of the States.

Article

STAMPEDES.––Almost every mail brings intelligence of the escape of slaves from the border slave States. Thirty-five are reported to have left a single county in Maryland in one day last week, and about a dozen from other places in the same State in the course of the week. Scarcely a day passes that such attempts are not made, successful, and the number is supposed to be very large that have resorted to this method of establishing their right to themselves during the summer in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia.-Anti-Slavery Standard

Article

Another Slave Stampede.––It will be seen by our “Mercury” letter from Washington, that the underground railroad is still in active employment by the abolitionists, there having been some 30 or 40 slaves run off Prince George’s country, in this State, in the last few days. If Mr. Pratt’s amendments to the fugitive slave bill should pass Congress, by which all the unrecovered stolen or abducted slaves are to be paid for, these things may not then be so frequent, as Government will then have a more direct interest in checking these unlawful proceedings on the part of certain citizens of free States––Balt. Sun.

Article

[Telegraphed for the Baltimore Sun.]

Excitement among the Colored Population––Effect of the Fugitive Slave Bill, &c.

PITTSBURG, Sept. 21.––There is some excitement here among colored people, owing to the passage by Congress of the fugitive slave bill, and the power it gives to the slave owner to enter the free States and take possession of his runaway property wherever he finds it. Many of them are preparing to leave for Canada in order to escape from those that they expect will soon be in pursuit of them.–– On Saturday, a large number of them left the city, and some of the first hotels are left very bare of servants by this sudden movement. Many have gone who were never suspected of being fugitives until the passage of this bill, and many others are preparing to join in the general stampede.

Article

   Great Excitement in Pittsburgh––Stampede of Fugitive Slaves, &c.

                              PITTSBURGH, Sept. 25. 

   About one hundred and fifty fugitive slaves have left here for the British Provinces since the excitement. Rumors are flying about that large parties of slave catchers are in town. 

   The North Western Bank [is] in bad repute, and many persons refuse to take the notes. 

Article

[Telegraphed for the Baltimore Sun]

The Fugitive Slave Stampede––Bank Rumor. &c.

PITTSBURG, Sept. 25, P.M.––Upwards of 140 fugitive slaves have left the city and Alleghany since last Saturday, for Canada.  They were all armed to the teeth, and were determined to die before they would surrender. Several Southerners, suspected as being slave hunters, are now here.

It is rumored that the North Western Bank of Virginia is in an unsound condition.

Article

                                Stampedes.

   Almost every mail brings intelligence of the escape of slaves from the border slave States.––Thirty-five are reported to have left a single county in Maryland in one day last week, and about a dozen from other places in the same State in the course of a week. Scarcely a day passes that such attempts are not made, successful and unsuccessful, and the number is supposed to be very large that have resorted to this method of establishing their right to themselves during the summer in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia.––Anti Slavery Standard. 

Article

               Pittsburgh, Sept. 24.

   A Negro Stampede.––Great excitement prevails here among our colored population, on account of the recent passage of the fugitive slave bill. A party of seventeen negroes, who had formerly been slaves, started on Saturday, armed to the teeth with pistols and bowie knives, en route for Canada. Small parties are leaving daily.

 

Article

            Consequences of further Agitation.

   After the adjournment of Congress the Union will be agitated with a fierce conflict. Assault and defense, crimination and retort, will involve the country in a war of opinion which has probably had no parallel. The opposing principles of fanaticism will co-operate in this disgraceful strife. These positive and negative forces will be united to destroy the Union. We have, however, no doubt that the love of the Union will prove too strong for the combined influence of its enemies. The power of popular opinion will quench the torch that fanaticism would apply to the Temple of Liberty. For ourselves, we shall stand for the Union and the Constitution. We believe that "the people of the United States," who formed the Constitution, can alone abrogate it. 

Article

From the Charleston Courier. –– By Telegraph.

New York. Sept. 30.––The Cotton market was firm on the 30th The sales reached 2000 bales at full prices. Lard 3/8; Grain drooping.

Both Houses of Congress adjourned sine die at noon to-day. Nothing of moment was done at the close of the session. The members are scattering in all directions.

The first slave, under the fugitive law, was successfully arrested in N. York on Friday, and brought home. The fugitive negroes are leaving Pennsylvania, N. York, and other free States for Canada. There is a regular stampede among them.

There was a frost in Baltimore Monday night, and weather was cold enough to form ice, which will do injury to the Tobacco crop.

Article

How Mr. Fillmore's Slave Catching Bill is received by his Constituents.––Duty of the general rising of the People.

A REGULAR STAMPEDE.––The passage of the Fugitive Slave bill by Congress has caused great commotion among our colored population. On Saturday a large number of them left the city for Canada, we believe. Some of our first hotels are left very bare of servants by this sudden movement. We had no idea that Pittsburgh was the home of so many fugitives, and feel sorry that a law has been passed by Congress that either drives them out of the Union entirely or back to perpetual slavery.––

[Pittsburgh Chron., 23d.

Article

Consequences of further Agitation

After the adjournment of Congress the Union will be agitated with a fierce conflict. Assault and defence, crimination and retort, will involve the country in a war of opinion which has probably no parallel. The opposing principles of fanaticism will co-operate in this disgraceful strife. These positive and negative forces will be united to destroy the Union.––We have, however, no doubt that the love of the Union will prove too strong for the combined influence of its enemies. The power of popular opinion will quench the torch that fanaticism would apply to the Temple of Liberty. –– For ourselves, we shall stand for the Union and the Constitution. We believe that "the people of the United States," who formed the Constitution, can alone abrogate it. 

Article

A BIG BATCH OF RUNAWAYS.--We find the following despatch in the Delta of Friday: 

   "One hundred and forty fugitive slaves left Pittsburg on Saturday, for Canada--well armed--resolved to die rather than be captured."

   Such is the announcement we find in the Vicksburg Sentinel, and the Disunion papers throughout the State will doubtless think the despatch a Godsend. Whether the Mississippian will again head it, with the joyous exclamation--"The work goes bravely on"--remains to be seen. Strange that these disunionists should rejoice in every attack upon the South! But so it is. Every thing that tends to weaken the Union; every rub the South receives, is to them a source of gratification, inasmuch as they think that thereby the probable existence of the Union is shortened. 

Article

   But our northern brethren, who are the friends of the constitution--and, let us add, of the Union--must be aware of the importance as well as the justice of suppressing this feeling and carrying out the law. The South have demanded such a law. It constitutes a part of one great system of compromise, which is calculated to restore the peace of the Union. Should that law be wantonly violated by mob law, it will make the South much more discontented than before it passed. No one can tell the excitement which may arise, or the mischiefs it may produce. We sincerely hope that every case of arrest may go off as quietly as those in New York and in Harrisburg; and then the South may be able to save its property, and the North will be rid of the most troublesome portion of its population. The Albany Argus justly remarks upon the case in New York:

Article

   THE SLAVE EXCITEMENT.––Our telegraphic despatches have already alluded to a stampede of the fugitive slaves at Pittsburgh. A despatch from that city, dated the 24th ult., says:

   There is some excitement here among the colored people, owing to the passage by Congress of the Fugitive Slave bill, and the power it gives to the slave owner to enter the free States and take possession of his runaway property where he finds it. Many of them are preparing to leave for Canada, in order to escape from those that they expect will soon be in pursuit of them. On Saturday, a large number roof them left the city, and some of the first hotels are left very bare of servants by this sudden movement. Many have gone who were never suspected of being fugitives until the passage of this bill, and many others are preparing to join in the general stampede. 

Article

Arrest of a Slave––The first arrest under the new fugitive slave law was made at New York on the 27th ult., and the slave has been brought home. The fugitive negroes are leaving Pennsylvania, New York, and other free States. There is a regular stampede among them in many places.

Article

            FROM WASHINGTON.

 (Correspondence of the Louisville Courier.)

 The effect of the fugitive slave bill on the negroes at the North––Arrests under its provisions––Appropriations for Custom Houses, &c., in the West––Attack of the Union upon Col. Humphrey Marshall, for his exposure of Ritchie's Rascality––Appointment of L.D. Stickney as Mail Agent, &c., &c.

                     WASHINGTON, Oct. 2, P.M.

   W.N. Haldeman––

Article

          RECAPTURE OF FUGITIVE SLAVES.

Article

   STAMPEDE AMONG THE NEGROES.––There was considerable excitement recently among the negroes, owing to the passage of the Fugitive Slave Bill. A large number of them have left the city for Canada, and some of the first hotels were left very bare of servants by this sudden movement. Many, says a Pittsburg paper, have gone who were never suspected of being fugitives until the passage of the bill, and many others are preparing to join in the general stampede. The Pittsburg Gazette has the following:

Article

   ANOTHER EVIDENCE OF THE TRUE FEELINGS ON THE PART ON THE NORTH.––The telegraphic despatches of the New Orleans Delta, of the 25th ult., from Pittsburg, mention that one hundred and forty fugitive slaves left that place for Canada, well armed and resolved to die rather than be re-captured. These black rascals were of course armed and supplied with the means of escape by those Northern men, who were said, by some of the speakers at the Submission meeting in this place, a few days since, to be sound on the slavery question. Did the history of the world ever present an instance of so patient a people, under grievous wrongs, as those of the South? England would she deluged the earth with blood and set the world by the ears for one tithe the causes the South has had with the North, upon this solitary question.

Article

   We learn that the first arrest of a runaway slave under the new Fugitive Slave Bill was recently made in New York. He was brought home. He belonged to Baltimore, and had been gone two years. 

   We learn also that there is a general stampede of runaway negroes form New York and Pennsylvania. They are cutting off for Canada.––One hundred and forty left Pittsburg at one time. 

Article

          FUGITIVE SLAVES.

   The passage of the fugitive slave bill created quite a stampede among that class of persons and their friends, in the northern cities. We observe a number of fugitives left Pittsburg immediately upon the receipt of the news, and others were making active preparations to leave for Canada. Meetings have been held in Boston and New York, composed of free negroes, fugitive slaves and a few abolitionists, at which no little indignation was manifested.––A telegraphic dispatch from Boston, dated the 2d, says:–

Article

The first slave under the fugitive slave law, was successfully arrested in New York on Friday, and brought home. The fugitive negroes are leaving Pennsylvania, New York, and other free States, for Canada.-- There is a regular stampede among them. 

Article

   "STAMPEDE."––The southern papers are beginning to make themselves merry on the subject of fugitive slaves. The Charleston Sun, under the above caption, says, "from our northern exchanges we perceive that the passage of the fugitive slave bill has had some effect in getting up a stampede among the negroes near the southern border of the state of Pennsylvania. We are inclined to the opinion, however, that it has mostly existence in the minds of northern editors who are desirous of humbugging the south into the belief that the bill is having some effect. This stampede, we believe, will be the greatest effect of that bill, viz: to run our fugitive slaves farther from us. As to the practicability of putting into operation any of the features of the bill, we do not think that northern feelings and prejudices will admit of it."

Article

     A REGULAR STAMPEDE.––The passage of the Fugitive Slave bill by Congress, caused the great commotion among our colored population. On Saturday a large number of them left the city for Canada, we believe. Some of our first hotels are left very bare of servants by this sudden movement. We had no idea that Pittsburgh was the home of so many fugitives, and feel sorry that a law has been passed by Congress that either drives them out of the Union entirely, or back to perpetual slavery. 

        [Pittsburg Chronicle 23d.

Article

   The passage of the fugitive slave bill has produced a stampede among the negroes In Pittsburgh for Canada. Some of the papers of that city are highly indignant of the loss of these citizens of Pennsylvania. 

Article

   FRED. DOUGLASS IN DANGER.--Since the passage, by Congress, of the fugitive slave bill, which allows the owners of sales to take their runaway negroes wherever they can be found in the United States, there has been quite a panic among this description of colored people at the North. At Pittsburg, Pennsylvania--the paradise of runaway negroes--there was a general stampede last week. Nearly all the waiters in the hotels have fled to Canada.-- On Sunday, thirty fled; on Monday, forty; on Tuesday, fifty; on Wednesday, thirty; and up to last accounts the total number who had gone to Canada would not fall short of three hundred. They went in large bodies, armed with pistols and bowie knives, determined to die, rather than be captured. 

Article

          FROM WASHINGTON.

[CORRESPONDENCE OF THE GEORGIA TELEGRAPH]

                                WASHINGTON, Oct. 8, 1850. 

The Past-time of the Administration--The next Presidency--the Abolitionists and their Proceedings--a few words about them, etc.

   There are not now a half dozen members of Congress in this city, and they would be away if they had time to reach their homes and return by the first day of the next session of Congress. 

   The Administration, for want of something better to do, have been engaged in turning democratic clerks out of office, and appointing whigs to fill their places. A two cent business, and only mentioned as an instance of the smallness of those who administer the Government. 

Article

     The Fugitive Slave Bill. 

Article

We understand that a gang of abolitionists were routed in Stewart county, a few days since. One out of the four was caught and ridden on a rail, the rest saved themselves by a stampede. These devils should be scourged from the South wherever found, for the first offence, and for the second, hung to the nearest tree,–Columbus (Ga.) Times.

Article

 Public Sentiment in the North. 

   Nearly every mail that reaches us brings convincing proof that the Albany Atlas was in error when it asserted that the sentiment of opposition to the fugitive slave law was "universal" in the non-slaveholding States. Gradually the great body of the people is moving; the voice of reason, duty, and patriotism is becoming audible amidst the din of that "abolition rub-a-dub," to which Mr. Webster so graphically alluded in his last speech in the Senate. We can readily understand how even the best inclined persons might have mistaken the first signs of public opinion on this exciting subject.