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A Few Plain Questions to the South

1. Do the southern states seriously contemplate a non-intercourse with the North, or a secession from the Union, or neither?

2.In the former case, how long can they do without the necessaries, the luxuries and the amenities of the North; or, to speak figuratively, when a child from resentment refuses his dinner, how many subsequent meals does he usually omit?

3. In the case of secession from the Union, in what part of Christendom would be found a more feeble nation than the separated South, without ships, without sailors, without manufactories, without white labor or industry, without much money, and with the volcano of the black population under their feet?

4.In case of a disruption of the Union, to which side will the frontier states of Maryland, Delaware, Missouri, &c., think it most prudent to attach themselves?

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Helper's Autobiography––His Pamphlet, and the Uses that Are Made of it by the Republican Party. 

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NEGROES IN THE CHEROKEE NATION. – The underground railroad has been out to work in the Cherokee Nation. A large stampede of negroes was attempted from the nation to Mexico; but the chiefs having been informed, by a faithful negro, of the movement, collected their warriors, under the pretence of going on a war trail against the Comanches, and arrested the fugitives.

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DAILY COMMERICAL.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1860.

 

Life of Capt. John Brown, by James Redpath.

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TELEGRAPHIC

            TO THE

Daily Whig & Courier

XXXVI CONGRESS— 1ST SESSSION.

                                                                                                            Washington, 20th

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COLONEL HUGH FORBES TURNED UP AGAIN.

 

Piquant Letter from the Friend of the Colored Man and of John Brown— Reasons for Forbes’ Withdrawal— The “Well Matured Plan”— Financial Affair— That Six Hundred Dollars— Letter to Senator Mason— Forbes is Dumb as an Oysters, &c., &e,

                                                                                                            London, Feb. 20, 1860.

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STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.--On Monday night some eight or ten slaves, belonging to persons in Frederick city, Md., and vicinity, absconded in a body. One of them belonged to Mrs. Caroline E. Brengle, others to Mrs. Mary Hammond, Messrs. John Smith, Ezra Hock, Christian Thomas and others. 

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   FIVE SLAVES RAN AWAY.––A family of five negroes, held as slaves by Edward Bredell, a few days ago ran away from his farm, situated six miles from the city, on the Clayton road. They consist of the mother, two sons, a daughter, and a young girl closely related to them. The master was on a visit to the East, and had left them in charge of an overseer. On the morning of their departure they obtained leave to visit some colored neighbors, but had not been long from the premises when their real design was suspected. The overseer soon found that they had not called at the house they pretended to visit, and his further investigations equally failed to discover them. A few years ago, Mr. Bredell emancipated thirty or forty slaves left him by a deceased relative in Baltimore.

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ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE— Supposed Work of Abolitionist. – A few slaves since five negroes belonging to Mr. Edward Bredell, disappeared very suddenly from their master’s farm, some six miles from the city, on the Clayton road. The runaway party consists of woman, aged about sixty, her two sons and daughter, aged respectfully seven, twelve, and twenty-one years, and a young girl, closely related to the family. The negro “Ike,” twenty-one years old, was Mr. Bredell’s coachman, and enjoyed the most unlimited confidence of his owner. Mr. Bredell himself, is on a visit to the East, the slaves at the time of their stampede, being in charge of an overseer. The mother, it seems, devised the plan of departure from the farm, though there are circumstances which lead to the belief that the negroes had previously been tampered with by white men.

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Quite a stampede took place among the negroes in this neighborhood on Saturday night last, and some three of them succeeded in getting within a few miles of the Ohio river, but were fortunately captured by some gentlemen in Lewis county, brought back, and are now in jail. The names of these would be Free Soilers are Jake, the property of Thos. R. Botts; Grant, or Gran, the property of Walker Thornton, of Bourbon county, but hired by Isaac Johnson, of this vicinity, and Lewis, the property of Lake Stockton. Another slave from the neighborhood of Sherburne, was also lodged in jail on Monday night, he having "declared his intention" of running away.Fleming Star.

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 While the fire eaters of the South are blustering about disunion, there are thousands of Shrew, practical men in that section who are alive to the effects of such threats upon their pockets. A writer in the Atlanta (Ca.) American states that the mere prospect of disunion has caused a fall in the price of cotton which will result in a loss of the South of $5,000,000,000 before the 6th of November. He sees no prospect, if the disunion project is carried out, of anything but starvation and would drive up the prices to an alarming figure. The writer says that the South would have the alternative of purchasing from the Northwest or starving, before the first of March. Utter prostration of business, and financial ruin, would follow any treasonable movement.

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A Sensible Southern Man.

The Louisville (Ky.,) Journal contains a letter from J.R. Buchannan, to the governor of Kentucky, from which we make brief extracts:

To resist the abolition agitation by disunion is as sensible as the course of the lunatic who, when a few drops of water had dropped through his roof ran out indignantly from his house into the pelting storm.

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STAMPEDE OF NEGROES FROM SOUTH CAROLINA.––A law has recently been passed in South Carolina, requiring all free colored persons to wear a badge of distinction. This many of the colored families living in Charleston deemed an indignity; and some have left the State in consequence of it. They have come North, and it is stated that about eighty families have arrived in Philadelphia. Most of these have means which place them above poverty. They are generally mulattoes of various shades of lightness.––Leader.

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Black Republicans Bolting–A Grand Stampede Brewing.

As we have often predicted, the Republicans are preparing to jump Jim Crow on their Intervention dogma and adopt Popular Sovereignty as the permanent creed of the party. In less than one year, whether Lincoln is elected or licked, "Non-intervention" will be their rallying cry.

See what the Cincinnati Commercial, a loud and leading Republican organ, says about "Intervention:"

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[From the Maysville Eagle.]

A few facts about Slaves in Kentucky.

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LEAVING FOR CANADA.––We hear of a number of colored men, fugitives, who have left the city for Canada within a few days. We perceive that a panic exists among the fugitives in other cities, who had heretofore believed themselves safe, trusting to the assurances of the Republicans. In Toledo, as we learn for the Herald and Times, there is quite a stampede for Canada among the blacks.––Cleveland Plaindealer.

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A STAMPEDE.––The issue of the recent fugitive slave case at Cleveland, Ohio, has caused a stampede among the negroes there in Toledo. They have left for Canada large numbers.

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No rational men does or can entertain a doubt, that Kentucky, if she secede from the Union, will, by the speediest of operations, be drained of her slaves––that there will be upon her soil at the end of two or three years at farthest no slaves except those, who, from their helplessness, will be a burden to their owners.

Men clearly see all this, and they are preparing for it. A great many are making arrangements to quit Kentucky with their slaves in the event of her secession and to establish themselves further South where slave stampedes into free territory will be less easy. Men have deposited money in our banks, state in that they will have no occasion for it if Kentucky remains in the Union, but that, if she shall secede, they will need it to purchase and open Southern plantations.

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            A NEGRO CONFEDERACY

The Rochester Express, in speaking of the probability, at a future day, of a great negro confederacy in the Southern States, says:

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 OUR CHARLESTON LETTER.

THREE CLASSES OF POLITICIANS––THE DECISION OF THE RHETT CLIQUE––GOV. DICKENS, JUDGE MAGRATH AND MR. MEMMINGER––NEGROES ON A STAMPEDE––THE TRUE SECURITY––THE MEN WHO CAN PREVENT VIOLENCE––THE UNION FEELING––PATRIOTISM––NEGRO DISAFFECTION––THE FLOATING BATTERY––THE INSPIRATION FROM THE ASPECT OF THINGS, LTC.

 From Our Own Correspondent.

                  CHARLESTON, March 7, 1861.

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Interesting from Charleston—Three Classes of Politicians.

The Charleston correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer, writes on the 7th:

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                                                            Southern Conciliation

                                           Stampede of Slave from Southern Carolina.

                                               [New York Tribune Correspondence]

              I have just left a Georgian, hailing from a small town midway between Macon and Augusta, who tells me that although in his immediate neighborhood the Secessionist have the majority, yet that even there many of his relatives are true to their country and loyal to its flag; he has just communicated to me a tale of horror, which I have no right to keep back from the readers of the Tribune.

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DRUNKEN REMARKS OF THE KEITT-ENGLAND AND SLAVERY- PATRIOTIC WOMEN- SLAVE PLOTS.

From Our Own Correspondent. 

Charleston, March 28, 186.

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   The Fugitive Slave Case in Chicago.

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The Chicago Slave Case.–The Chicago Tribune speaking of this case says:–

The Harris family lived near St. Louis, and had been fugitives for nearly a month. Their error was in stopping in Chicago to see a maternal relative of the wife, under the stupid fallacy that a nigger has any right to have a mother, other than a mere matter of business. The warrants for their arrest were made out by U.S. Commissioner Corneau of Springfield.

There was a general stampede on Wednesday among the fugitive slaves harbored and residing in this city and within a day or two hundreds of them will have left for Canada, a course we advise to all, who cannot make up their minds to save the country by going back to their masters.

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         From the Chicago Post.

      THE AFRICAN EXCITEMENT.

   Fugitive Slaves and the Underground Railroad.

   Since the arrest and return of five fugitive slaves by the United States Marshal on the 3d inst., the climate of Africa has existed in Chicago. The excitement has been hot. The negroes and their white friends, who resist the execution of the Fugitive Slave law, have been in that state of temperature at which the mild beverage they usually imbibe loses its quiescent state in that of ebullition. In other words, boils. Although the bubbling has not appeared in a very active state on the surface, yet just beneath, the agitation has been, deed, startling and slightly terrific. We have taken some pains to investigate the subject, in order to present before our readers some facts in regard to the negro excitement existing in this city during the last few days. 

        CAUSES OF THE ALARM.

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Reign of Terror Among the Colored People of Chicago.

         [From the Chicago Tribune.]

   The United States Marshal and his standing advertisement that he has fully equipped his office in the city with fellows of the right kidney, and is now willing to answer all orders, and catch all runaways, guaranteeing promptness and dispatch in so doing, has created a wonderful state of feeling among our colored citizens, to which we have before referred. In saloons and bar-rooms about town, the zealous Federal officer is praised, but good men and humane hang their heads, Republicans finding this one more consolation in the matter,––just this, that the Marshal does well to choose his tools from the party that has always kept blood-hounds in leash, ready at the slave-driver’s beck and bidding. No Republican has yet, we believe received an appointment of the Marshal.

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RENDITION OF FUGITVE SLAVES FROM CHICAGO— STAMPEDE FOR CANADA— PRACTICAL ABOLISTIONIST IN KENTUCKY. — It appears, that from some cause or other, the fugitive slave law is more efficiently executed in Northern Illinois now than it was during either Pierce’s term or Buchanan’s. Few or no fugitive slaves, for instance, were returned from Chicago between the years 1853 and 1861. The consequence was that a very large number of fugitives congregated in that city, feeling themselves perfectly secure against arrest and rendition to service.

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The recent instances of the arrest, and rendition of fugitive slaves, escaped into Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois, under the fugitive slave law--without disorder tumult, or attempt at resistance--may be mentioned as far as these instances go, as a favorable sign of the times. It is shown that the matter, which has given such just cause of offence at the South, is still capable of being controlled by law. The carrying out of the law, too, has caused a stampede of runaway negroes in the free States, into Canada. In one sense, then, the "Canada line," is removed further from us. If runaways can only be safe in Canada it will break up the "free State trade" in the line of harboring and concealing what belongs to their neighbors under the Constitution of the country.

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A general stampede of negroes is taking place. Three hundred passed over into Canada from Detroit, between Saturday and Monday evening. One hundred and six, left Chicago by Railroad on Monday evening, for Canada, and it is said that nearly one thousand fugitive slaves, who have survived in Chicago, nine last Fall, are now on their way out of the United States.

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So strongly impressed are those interested with the fact that in that region, which has heretofore been regarded as an abolitionist pandemonium, the fugitive slave law, with all other laws, will be observed, that at this moment there is a perfect stampede for Canada of the runaway slaves who felt themselves perfectly secure against recapture when the Executive power was in Democratic hands, in and about Chicago.

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The recent instances of the arrest and rendition of fugitive slaves escaped into Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Illinois under the fugitive slave law, without disorder, tumult, or attempt at resistance, may be mentioned, as far as these instances go, as a favorable sign of the times. It is shown that the matter which has given such just cause of offence at the South is still capable of being controlled by law. The carrying out of the law, too, has caused a stampede of runaway negroes in the free States into Canada. In one sense, then, the “Canada line” is removed further from U.S. If runaways can only be safe in Canada it will break up the “Free-State trade” in the line of harboring and concealing what belongs to their neighbors under the Constitution of the country.–Alexandria Gazette.

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Great Stampede of Fugitive Slaves for Canada.––CHICAGO, April 8.––One hundred and six fugitive slaves, who have heretofore taken up their abode here, left this city last night for Canada, via the Michigan Southern Railroad. Over one thousand fugitives have arrived there since last fall, most of whom have left since the recent arrest of five fugitives by the United States Marshal.

DETROIT, April –– About three hundred fugitive slaves, principally by way of Illinois, have passed into Canada at this point since Saturday, and large numbers are reported to be on the way. Many of them are entirely destitute, and much suffering is anticipated, notwithstanding the efforts for their relief.

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GREAT NEGRO EXCITEMENT!

–––––––––––––

SUCCESSFUL ARREST OF RUNAWAY SLAVES IN CHICAGO.

The newly appointed U.S. Marshal of this district signalized the commencement of his official career yesterday morning, by the successful arrest of five runaway slaves––a negro, his wife, and three children.

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HARRISBURG, April 26.

It is reported that an attack was made by the Marylanders, on Hanover Village, York county, on Tuesday, occasioned by a great stampede among the negroes. Reliable accounts say that whole families are crossing into this State.

The report places the total loss of slaves by Maryland, since the war troubles began, at five hundred.

Great fears are entertained in the border counties of Maryland, of the departure of the entire slave population.

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STAMPEDE OF MARYLAND SLAVE.

Harrisburg, April 26, 1861

It is reported that an attack was made by Marylander on Hanover village, York county, on Tuesday last, occasioned by a great stampede of negroes. Reliable accounts say that whole families are crossing into Adams, York, and Franklin counties, in this State. A report places the total loss of slaves by Maryland, since the troubles began at five hundred. Great fears are entertained in the border counties of the departure of the entire slave population

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FINANCIAL AND COMERCIAL.

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SUNDAY, April 28, 1861.

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                             FLIGHT OF FUGITIVES FROM ILLINOIS.

              The Stampede for Canada— Scenes of the Dept.

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   FLIGHT OF FUGITIVES FROM ILLINOIS.

              The Stampede for Canada— Scenes of the Dept. &c.

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HARRISBURG, April 26.

It is reported that an attack was made by the Marylanders, on Hanover Village, York county, on Tuesday, occasioned by a great stampede among the negroes. Reliable accounts say that whole families are crossing into this State. The report places the total loss of slaves by Maryland, since the war troubles began, at five hundred. Great fears are entertained in the border counties of Maryland, of the departure of the entire slave population.

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Harrisburg. 26. – It is reported that an attack was made by Marylanders n Hanover village, York Co., on Tuesday— occasioned by great stampede of negroes. Reliable accounts say that while families are crossing into his State. Report places the total loss of slaves by Maryland since troubles began, at 500. – Great fears are entertained in the border counties of Md. Of the departure of the entire slaves population.

              Gen. Scott assured a gentleman yesterday that Washington was safe against all present attacks. Our informant confirms that arrival there of three N.Y. and the 8th Mass. Regiments.

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            [PER PONY EXPRESS.]

            Letter from Washington.

          [EDITORIAL CORRESPONDENCE.]

              [Continued from yesterday.]

                WASHINGTON, April 20, 1861.

 The Civil War––North and South Contrasted.

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              [PER PONY EXPRESS.]

                Letter from New York. 

      [FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.]

                              NEW YORK, April 27, 1861.

   Advices from your city of the 13th instant were published in our journals of yesterday morning.

   Safe Arrival of California Treasure.

   The steamship Champion, with the California mails and treasure of the 1st April, came into port on Tuesday, to the great relief of our community, and especially to the underwriters and of those having friends on board, as a painful anxiety had been prevalent regarding her safety, on account of the belief that there were piratical craft abroad with the express purpose of capturing her. She was immediately turned over to the Government and taken to the Navy Yard, where she will undergo the necessary repairs, preparatory to being attached to the blockading squadron. 

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        REPRISALS AND THE BLACKS.

   The New York Courier and Enquirer had been conspicuous for twenty-five years, for its opposition to what are called "Abolition" ideas, and yet we find it recently using the following language: 

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FROM THE (WASHINGTON) NATIONAL REPUBLICAN.  

REPRISALS AND THE BLACKS.

   The New York Courier and Enquirer had been conspicuous for twenty-five years, for its opposition to what are called "Abolition" ideas, and yet we find it recently using the following language: 

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FIRST EDITION

          BY TELEGRAPH.

                                           WAR MOVEMENTS!

                                    OCCUPATION OF NEWPORT POINT.

                          STAMPEDE OF FUGITIVES TO FT. MONROE.

A NEW LEVY OF 100,000 MEN.

  By Vermont & Boston Line.

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THE FUGITIVE SLAVE QUESTION

                                                            Washington, May 29, 1861.

            Colonel Butler, the brother of General Butler, is here to ask for instructions as to the disposal of the slaves now hourly seeking protection among the federal troops in and about Fortress Monroe. The matter has been before the Cabinet, but no definite conclusion has as yet been arrived at. The action of General Butler in the premises will doubtlessly be sustained.