Our database contains over 1,000 newspaper articles that specifically label a group escape as a "slave stampede" or some related variant, such as "negro stampede." Our document records also include hundreds of other types of primary sources and newspaper articles related to these stampedes but that do not contain the word itself. The map below provides a sample visualization of the newspaper coverage between 1856 and 1860 with clickable access to the various records inside our database. The detailed listing underneath includes records for all of the documents from the period 1847 to 1865, containing both transcripts and original images.

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GRAND STAMPEDE.––On Friday or Saturday night last, says the Times, between twenty and twenty-five negroes, belonging to different plantations in Kenton Co. Ky., across the river, left for parts unknown, via the state of Ohio. We learn that the aggregate amount of reward offered for their apprehension is over four thousand dollars.––Cincinnati Atlas. 

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   A stampede of negro slaves took place at Maysville, Ky., a few days ago. They are gone to help to people the wilds of Ohio and Canada. 

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NEGRO STAMPEDE. We learn that a stampede occurred among the negroes at and near Maysville. A few days ago. Five or six of the number belonged to a prominent and influential members of the Northern Methodist Church at Maysville. And we also understand that a distinguished preacher of that denomination was at the gentleman’s house at the time his negroes le ft [left].

Covington (Ky.) Register.

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   Grand Stampede.––On Friday or Saturday night, between 20 and 23 slaves belonging to different plantations in Kenton county, Ky., crossed the river and left for parts unknown, via the State of Ohio––Four thousand dollars were offered for their apprehension

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Negro Stampede –– We learn that a stampede occurred among the negroes at and near Maysville, a few days ago. Five or six of the number belonged to a prominent and influential member of the Northern Methodist Church at Maysville. And we also understand that a distinguished preacher of that denomination was at the gentleman’s house at the time his negroes left.––Covington (Ky.) Register.

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   NEGRO STEALING.––We learn from the Des Moines Valley Whig, that a number of abolitionists residing at Salem, Iowa, recently stole nine negroes from a Mr. Daggs, of Clark county, in this state. They were pursued and captured by their owner and some of his friends, who, on their way back to Clark county, were, in turn, mobbed by superior numbers of abolitionists, and their slaves again set free. On last Wednesday, about one hundred men, all armed, started from Farmington, Missouri, for Salem, Iowa, and we shall in all probability soon hear of the recapture of the negroes, or the arrest of the abolitionists, and probably some bloodshed; which generally accompanies such lawless acts.––St. Louis Reveille

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   It is stated that a number of abolitionists residing at Salem, Iowa, recently stole nine negroes from a Mr. Daggs, of Clark county, Mo. They were pursued and captured by the owner and some of his friends, who, on their way back were, in turn, mobbed by superior numbers of abolitionists, and their slaves again set free. Subsequently, about one hundred men, all armed, started from Farmington, Missouri, for Salem, Iowa, to recapture the negroes, or arrest the abolitionists. 

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   It is stated that a number of abolitionists residing at Salem, Iowa, recently stole nine negroes from a Mr. Daggs, of Clark county, Mo. They were pursued and captured by the owner and some of his friends, who, on their way back were, in turn, mobbed by superior numbers of abolitionists, and their slaves again set free. Subsequently, about one hundred men, all armed, started from Farmington, Missouri, for Salem, Iowa, to recapture the negroes, or arrest the abolitionists. 

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   STAMPEDE AMONG THE NEGROES.––The city yesterday morning was filled with rumors and excitement on account of a concocted and well-laid scheme for a wholesale absconding of the negroes in this vicinity. Rumor states that the number ascertained to have left this neighborhood on Saturday night is between fifty and eighty. We have no certain information as to the precise number missing, but we know of at least thirty who are certainly gone. They left by the way of the Russell road, in a northern direction. It is supposed that they have been persuaded off by and are under the care of the abolitionists. One owner states that they were seen going down the Versailles road, firing pistols, whooping and singing songs and ditties. There is no doubt but that white men have had a hand in this matter. Five thousand dollars reward has been offered by the owners of the runaways, for their apprehension.

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   By a telegraphic despatch received from Maysville, we learn that the runaway negroes were met on Monday night, seven miles form the river, by twenty white men. A fight ensued, and one white man was killed. None of the negroes were taken at the time. Five were afterwards captured....

   Five of the negroes who absconded from this city on Saturday night have been apprehended, together with a white man, who had enticed them away. 

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   We copy the following from the Lexington (Ky.) Atlas, of yesterday:––

   STAMPEDE AMONG THE NEGROES.––The city yesterday morning was filled with rumors and excitement on account of a concocted and well-laid scheme for a wholesale absconding of the negroes in this vicinity. Rumor states that the number ascertained to have left this neighborhood on Saturday night is between fifty and eighty. We have no certain information as to the precise number missing, but we know of at least thirty who are certainly gone. They left by the way of the Russell road, in a northern direction. It is supposed that they have been persuaded off by and are under the care of the abolitionists. One owner states that they were seen going down the Versailles road, firing pistols, whooping and singing songs and ditties. There is no doubt but that white men have had a hand in this matter. Five thousand dollars reward has been offered by the owners of the runaways, for their apprehension.

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   The citizens of Fayette County are requested to meet at the Court House on Monday next at 2 o'clock for the purpose of preventing incendiaries interfering with our slaves. It is confidently believed that a plan can be devised which will accomplish this purpose. 

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   Up to last night about forty of the runaway negroes had been apprehended. They are starving out in the hills of Bracken, and were compelled to come in to the settlements and give up. Several were lodged in jail in this city yesterday on suspicion of a design to run off. Fowler who was shot by the negroes in Harrison was still alive at our last dates from the theatre of action. 

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   ABOLITION––RUNAWAYS––PUBLIC MEETING––GREAT EXCITEMENT––THREATS OF VENGEANCE.––News having been received in this city yesterday morning, that the runaway negroes had been overtaken near the line of Harrison and Bracken, and a white man killed in an attempt to arrest them, hand-bills were posted through the city calling a public meeting in the Court Houses yard at eight o'clock, for the purpose of adopting efficient means to overtake and secure the runaways and their aiders and abettors. At the appointed hour a large crowd assembled in front of the Court House, and an informal meeting was organized, by calling T.H. Duncan, Esq., to the chair, who read the following letter received on Tuesday night at two o'clock by express from Cynthiana:

                     CYNTHIANA, Aug. 8, 6 P.M.

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      For the Lexington Atlas

         LEXINGTON, August 8, 1848

   MESSRS. EDITORS:––I wish to address the public through the medium of your valuable paper, upon a subject that deeply involves the interest of this community––and which requires prompt action on the part of the citizens. 

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   We copy the following form the Lexington Atlas, of yesterday. Great excitement prevails throughout the interior counties in regard to the stampede:

   ABOLITION––RUNAWAYS––PUBLIC MEETING––GREAT EXCITEMENT––THREATS OF VENGEANCE.––

News having been received in this city yesterday morning, that the runaway negroes had been overtaken near the line of Harrison and Bracken, and a white man killed in an attempt to arrest them, hand-bills were posted through the city calling a public meeting in the Court Houses yard at eight o'clock, for the purpose of adopting efficient means to overtake and secure the runaways and their aiders and abettors. At the appointed hour a large crowd assembled in front of the Court House, and an informal meeting was organized, by calling T.H. Duncan, Esq., to the chair, who read the following letter received on Tuesday night at two o'clock by express from Cynthiana:

                     CYNTHIANA, Aug. 8, 6 P.M.

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   PATRICK DOYLE, the man who was apprehended with the negroes in Bracken county, is the individual who left the Catholic church some years ago, and believed, or pretended to believe, that the Catholics intended to murder him. He is generally supposed to be either an imbecile or a monomaniac; and it can hardly be supposed that he is the only white man engaged in producing the stampede among the slaves in this neighborhood. Others were doubtless engaged in the enterprise, for it was certainly above Doyle's capacity.

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           THE RUNAWAY NEGROES.

   We saw and conversed with Dr. B.F. Barkley, of Harrison, yesterday morning, who had just arrived, bearing under his charge the fellow Doyle, alias Kelley, alias Smith, alias Rankin, who was apprehended under the charge of aiding the negroes to escape from this neighborhood. Dr. B states that the first intimation the people of Harrison had of the stampede, two negro men, belonging to Mr. T. Scott and B. Gratz, Esqs., of this city, came into Claysville, Harrison county, on Monday morning, in a state of starvation, and begged to be brought back. They reported between 40 and 70 negroes to be in the neighborhood, concealed in the woods. 

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                            For the Lexington Atlas.

   MESSRS. EDITORS: As there has appeared in your paper of yesterday an article upon the subject of Abolitionists, slaves, &c., it may not be amiss to give a few suggestions upon the subject for the benefit of our citizens. 

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   A report reached our city, yesterday evening that Mr. SAM'L SCOTT, son of BENJ. SCOTT, dec'd late of this county, wandered off from the company that he was with in pursuit of the runaway negroes from this neighborhood, and was killed by the negroes; and that his body had been found. 

   We give but little credence to this report as we learn that Mr. Wm. MURPHEY returned yesterday evening about 3 o'clock and had heard nothing of Scott's being lost or killed. 

   There is another report in circulation to the effect, that some of the fugitive slaves applied to a farmer for provisions, and upon his refusing to let them have any, they beat him most unmercifully and left him for dead. 

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   Some of our friends have misrepresented or misunderstood our remarks in yesterday's Atlas, in relation to Doyle. We do not wish to convey the idea that Doyle was too much of an imbecile or mono maniac to be punished for his participation in the late stampede among the slaves in this vicinity; but that others must have been engaged in it, who were more capable than he was, of originating and conducting such an enterprise; and that our citizens ought to be on the look out for them. 

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   CHARLES H. FOWLER, the young man who was wounded a few days since by the negroes, we learn, died on Thursday. He was wounded at the battle of Buena Vista, and was a very worthy young man. 

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   Patrick Doyle, the man who was apprehended with the negroes in Bracken county, is the individual who left the Catholic church some years ago, and believed, or pretended to believe, that the Catholics intended to murder him. He is generally supposed to be either an imbecile or a monomaniac; and it can hardly be supposed that he is the only white man engaged in producing the stampede among the slaves in this neighborhood. Others were doubtless engaged in the enterprise, for it was certainly above Doyle's capacity.––Lexington Atlas, yesterday. 

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   We learn that the authorities of Harrison and Bracken counties have demanded all the runaway negroes that were apprehended in those counties, with a view to having them tried as principals or accessaries in the murder of Fowler, and that several of them left to day, in custody of persons duly authorized to demand and take them. We suppose that Doyle will be taken back there to be tried for murder, instead of being tried here for negro stealing. 

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             Doyle-–the Negro Abductor. 

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   THE KENTUCKY RUNAWAYS.––The numerical strength of the recent stampede seems not to be known by our Kentucky neighbors. The discrepancies in the number of slaves said to have run away, according to the statements of different papers, are so great, that the whole matter has probably been exaggerated. 

   A telegraphic despatch was received in Lexington on Tuesday, from Paris, to the effect that five of the escaped negroes and one white man had been taken near Cynthiana, and lodged in jail. The Observer says:

   "The information further is, that the whole county in that direction was aroused, and that no doubt was entertained that the whole of the negroes would be taken."

   Another despatch, received at 7 o'clock Tuesday evening, mentioned the arrival in Paris from Cynthiana, of Mr. Donner, who stated that when he left six or seven more of the slaves had been arrested. 

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   We have been misinformed with regard to young Fowler of Harrison. He is not dead as reported, but is now considered out of danger. 

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              Public Meeting.

   Pursuant to public notice, a large meeting was held in the Court House at this place on yesterday. Upon motion, Gen. James Dudley was called to the Chair, and Beverly Hicks appointed Secretary. It was stated to the meeting that the object in calling the citizens of the county together was, to take into consideration the loud complaints which were being made in consequence of persons enticing our slaves to abscond from their masters, thus creating great pecuniary loss to individuals, and a state of insubordination among slaves, dangerous to the peace and prosperity of society; also, to take into consideration the propriety of enforcing the laws in regard to slaves who were hiring their time, and running at large; also, to enforce the laws in regard to free persons of color, emigrating to our county; and also, the laws, generally, in regard to slaves. 

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   STAMPEDE AMONG THE NEGROES.––We copy the following from the Lexington (Ky.) Atlas of Tuesday:

   The city yesterday morning was filled with rumors and excitement, on account of a concocted and well laid scheme for a wholesale absconding of the negroes in this vicinity. It has been ascertained that thirty-six slaves have been missing. Several have run away from Woodford and Franklin. We learn, by a telegraphic despatch, that a good many escaped from the counties of Bourbon and Mason on Saturday night. 

   It is supposed that they have been persuaded off by and are under the care of the abolitionists. 

   Five thousand dollars reward has been offered by the owners of the runaways for their apprehension. 

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   STAMPEDE AMONG THE NEGROES.––The city yesterday morning was filled with rumors and excitement on account of a concocted and well-laid scheme for a wholesale absconding of the negroes in this vicinity. Rumor states that the number ascertained to have left this neighborhood on Saturday night is between fifty and eighty. We have no certain information as to the precise number missing, but we know of at least thirty who are certainly gone. They left by the way of the Russell road, in a northern direction. It is supposed that they have been persuaded off by and are under the care of the abolitionists. One owner states that they were seen going down the Versailles road, firing pistols, whooping and singing songs and ditties. No doubt, but that white men have had a hand in this matter. $5000 reward has been offered by the owners of the runaways for their apprehension. It has been ascertained that thirty-six slaves have been missing.

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  THE RUNAWAY SLAVES.––The Kentucky papers received yesterday bring but little additional information as to the runaway slaves. It seems that they have nearly all been taken and lodged in jail, at different points. Young Fowler was shot through the left kidney, and the wounded is supposed to be mortal. Only one other white man was shot––Joseph Duncan, who was wounded in the mouth by which he lost a tooth. A pistol ball was also put through his hat. Several of the slaves were wounded, and one killed. Six we believe to have succeeded in crossing the Ohio near Ripley, and effecting their escape.

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   DOYLE, the scoundrel who is now in jail at Lexington, under the charge of planning an arranging the late negro stampede, is the fellow who was confined in the Frankfort jail some weeks since under a charge of theft, and was acquitted on the ground of insanity. That plea will not avail him in the present case. 

                    Frankfort Commonwealth. 

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The runaway slaves again.––A fight––one man shot––re-capture of slaves, &c.

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   PATRICK DOYLE, charged with being concerned in enticing slaves to runaway, had a hearing before an examining court, on the previous day. A number of witnesses were examined, and although no positive testimony was elicited against him, his guilt was made sufficiently manifest to justify the court in sending him on for further trial before the Fayette Circuit Court. Bail to the amount of $20,000 was required, which the prisoner was not able to give, and was committed to jail. 

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   THE RUNAWAY SLAVES.––Louisville, Aug. 12.––Patrick Doyle, the man who was apprehended with the runaway negroes in Bracken county, has been taken to Lexington. It is stated that he left the Catholic church a few years ago, and afterward believed, or pretended to believe, that the Catholics intended to murder him. The Lexington Atlas says, the general opinion is, that he is either an imbecile or a monomaniac, and that some other person or persons of some more capacity must have been engaged in the abduction of the negroes. The following is from the Lexington Atlas of yesterday––

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   STAMPEDE AMONG THE NEGROES.––Some sixty negroes recently ran away from the vicinity of Lexington, Kentucky. They were last seen in a body, on the public road, and were hollowing, singing, and firing pistols. The owners have offered a reward of $5,000 for their apprehension. White men are supposed to be at the bottom of it. 

   Later information brings news of the capture of the greater portion of the runaways, after several battles, in which two white men were wounded––one of them mortally––and one negro killed. A white man by the name of Patrick Doyle was taken with the negroes. The most intense excitement prevailed. 

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                Last Night's Report. 

   KENTUCKY RUN-AWAY SLAVES.––The run-away slaves have nearly all been taken and lodged in jail at different points. Young Fowlers was shot through the kidney––supposed mortally wounded. Only one other white man was shot. Joseph Duncan was wounded in the mouth. Several of the slaves wounded, and one killed. Six succeeded in crossing the Ohio near Ripley, and escaped.

   The plot seems to have been pretty well matured, but a heavy rain fell which swelled the creeks so as to retard the movements of the fugitives towards the river. The slaves appear to have but poorly provided themselves with provisions, and grew so hungry that two or three of the party who had escaped from Lexington went on to Claysville after they had been out two nights and one day hungry and worn down, and begged to be taken back to their masters. They gave the first information. 

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   THE KENTUCKY SLAVE STAMPEDE.––The Western papers las night bring nothing further with regard to the runaway slaves. The Louisville Journal, speaking of the leader of the movement, says:

   Patrick Doyle, the fellow who aided the negroes in the neighborhood of Lexington to escape, is undoubtedly a scamp of the first water. He was arrested in this city a few weeks ago for attempting to sell some free negroes that he had induced to accompany him from Cincinnati. For want of bail, he was committed to our work-house, from which he made his escape. Nothing had been heard of him since his escape, until the news of his apprehension and imprisonment at Lexington reached here. 

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      The Absconding Slaves.

   Down to Thursday the excitement in the counties of Harrison, Bracken and Mason, Kentucky, in consequence of the slave-stampede, has abated but little. The Maysville Eagle had received information that another of the men who was [were] in pursuit of the slaves, had been shot in attempting to arrest a party of them. The editor was also informed, by a letter from Augusta, that 19 additional runaways has [have] been lodged in Bracken jail, and 20 more secured at Claysville. The name of the whiteman [white man] who had been arrested is given as Doyle, and it is said that he was sometime [some time] ago traveling in Kentucky as an agent for the sale of Rice's book against Popery.

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             Doyle, the Negro Abductor.

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              MEETING IN FAYETTE.

   At an Adjourned meeting of the citizens of Lexington and the County of Fayette, held at the Court House in Lexington, on Saturday, the 19th of August, 1848, in the absence of GEN. JAMES DUDLEY, the President of the former meeting, JAMES H. ALLEN, Esq., was called to the Chair, and BEVERLY A. HICKS, (the former Secretary,) was requested again to discharge the duties of that position. 

   MADISON C. JOHNSON, Esq., from the Committee appointed for the purpose, presented the following, resolutions, which, having been read, were unanimously adopted:

   The Committee to whom were referred the consideration of the measures necessary for securing to owners their rights in slave property, would report the following resolutions:

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   Patrick Doyle, confined in jail in this city for negro-stealing, attempted on Sunday night to escape, by cutting a hole through the wall of his cell. He has since been put in irons, which will render his custody perfectly secure. 

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE IN KENTUCKY.   A larger number of slaves––fifty or seventy-five, says the Lexington Observer––owned in and about Lexington, made their escape on the night of the 5th inst. The plan had been concocted for some time previous by the Abolitionists, who were to convey the blacks to a place of security for ten dollars each. A pursuit was at once instituted, and parties had gone from Maysville to assist in the recapture. A telegraphic dispatch from that place states that the fugitives were overtaken by a par[ty] of twenty whites near the river, but being armed, they offered a successful resistance, killing one whit man. Subsequent to the fight, five negroes were taken near Maysville, and six or seven at Cynthiana. The whole country in the vicinity was aroused, and the probability is that all have since been secured. 

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   THE RUNAWAY SLAVES.––Patrick Doyle, the man who was apprehended with the runaway negroes in Bracken county, has been taken to Lexington. It is stated that he left the Catholic Church a few years ago, and afterward believed, or pretended to believe, that the Catholics intended to murder him. The Lexington Atlas says, the general opinion is, that he is either an imbecile or a monomaniac, and that some other person or persons of more capacity must have been engaged in the abduction of the negroes. The following is from the Lexington Atlas of yesterday:––

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   KENTUCKY SLAVE STAMPEDE.––We learn from the Lexington (Ky.) Atlas, of Saturday last, that Patrick Doyle, charged with being concerned in enticing slaves to runaway, had a hearing before an examining court, on the previous day. A number of witnesses were examined, and although no positive testimony was elicited against him, his guilt was made sufficiently manifest to justify the court in sending him on for further trial before the Fayette Circuit Court. Bail to the amount of $20,000 was required, which the prisoner was not able to give, and was committed to jail. 

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             Negro Stampede in Kentucky.

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   Doyle, the scoundrel who is now in jail at Lexington, under the charge of planning and arranging the late negro stampede, is the fellow who was confined in the Frankfort jail some weeks since under a charge of theft, and was acquitted on the ground of insanity. That plea will not avail him in the present case.––Frankfort (Ky.) Commonwealth. 

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   A Slave Stampede.––We learn that on Tuesday night a stampede took place among the slaves in Baltimore county, twelve having gone without leave from two gentlemen of the county. They seem to have acted in concert, and are probably before this time on Pennsylvania "free soil." Six of them, we understood, were the property of the Hon. J.T. H. Worthington. 

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                      BALTIMORE, Sept. 7, 1848.

The Isabel at Portsmouth––Remains of the Gallant Dead––Extensive Slave Stampede––Departure of the Liberia Packet––Theatricals, &c.

   The new ocean steamer Isabel, reached Norfolk on her first trial, a distance of 200 miles, in sixteen hours, but was delayed considerably by her rudder, and portions of her machinery, not working smooth. She was taken into the dry dock yesterday, and will be coppered, and back to our wharf on Tuesday next.

   The remains of Capt. Boyd and Lieut. Tanneyhill, late Baltimoreans, who lest [lost] their lives in a skirmish near Tampico, arrived at this port last night, and were immediately taken charge of by the military and Odd Fellows.