Our database contains over 1,000 newspaper articles that specifically label a group escape as a "slave stampede" or some related variant, such as "negro stampede." Our document records also include hundreds of other types of primary sources and newspaper articles related to these stampedes but that do not contain the word itself. The map below provides a sample visualization of the newspaper coverage between 1856 and 1860 with clickable access to the various records inside our database. The detailed listing underneath includes records for all of the documents from the period 1847 to 1865, containing both transcripts and original images.

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   THE KENTUCKY SLAVE STAMPEDE.––The Maysville Eagle makes the following notice of the slave trial progressing in Bracken County, Ky:

   "The grand jury found a true bill against seven of the slaves in Bracken county for the late outrage committed there. One bill for conspiracy, insurrection and rebellion, and one for shooting with intent to kill.––Upon the first, a jury was obtained on Tuesday, and the trial is now progressing. Two negroes occupied nearly five hours in testifying, since which half a dozen white men have testified in relation to the resistance and firing by the company of negroes upon the white men who attempted to take them up as runaway slaves. The jury is composed of good men of Bracken county, selected by the sheriff at a called term, and not by Commissioners as at a general term."

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   The Charleston Courier has news by telegraph, to the effect that about twenty slaves made their escape to parts unknown, from the vicinity of Baltimore, on the 6th inst. The Courier's correspondent characterizes it as a regular stampede, but gives no particulars of the manner in which they effected their escape. These stampedes are becoming every day occurrences. 

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NEGRO STAMPEDE. Twelve slaves, belonging to individuals in Baltimore county, escaped last week, and have not been caught.-- Probably bound to Canada.

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            The Kentucky Slave Stampede. – They Maysville Eagle makes the following notice of the slave trial progressing in Bracken county, Kentucky:
            The grand jury found a true bill against seven of the slaves in Bracken county, for the late outrage committed there. One bill for conspiracy, insurrection and rebellion, and one for shooting with intent to kill. Upon the first, a jury was obtained on Tuesday, and the trial is now progressing.

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STAMPEDE FRUSTRATED.––We learn that about forty negroes had made arrangements to leave their masters, in Woodford county, on Saturday night last, but the plot was discovered just in time to defeat its execution. The negroes all had free passes. According to the plan of operations, each was to steal a horse and cross the Ohio river before day. They were betrayed by a negro to whom the plot was disclosed, and who was requested to join in it. The negroes stated that two or three white men who had been in the neighborhood some days, furnished them free passes. These men got an intimation of the discovery of the plot, and made their escape.

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         Doyle's Trial and Conviction.

   Doyle was put upon trial yesterday morning. A jury was obtained with but little or no difficulty.––After the examination of a number of witnesses the counsel for the Commonwealth withdrew all the indictments but one, and the case was submitted to the jury without argument. After a few moments consultation, the jury returned into Court with a perdict of guilty, and fixed the period of servitude in the Penitentiary at TWENTY YEARS. 

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   We omitted in our notice yesterday morning, of the trial and conviction of Doyle, that he plead guiltyf to the indictment upon which he was tried.

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            The Kentucky Slave Stampede. – They Maysville Eagle makes the following notice of the Slave trial progressing in Bracken county, Kentucky: -
           
The grand jury found a true bill against seven of the slaves in Bracken county for the late outrage committed there. One bill for conspiracy, insurrection and rebellion, and one for shooting with intent to kill.––Upon the first, a jury was obtained on Tuesday, and the trial is now progressing. Two negroes occupied nearly five hours in testifying, since which half a dozen white men have testified in relation to the resistance and firing by the company of negroes upon the white men who attempted to take them up as runaway slaves. The jury is composed of good men of Bracken county, selected by the sheriff at a called term, and not by Commissioners as at a general term.

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     CONVICTION OF DOYLE IN KENTUCKY.––The white man Doyle, who figured so largely in the great slave stampede in Kentucky, some time since, resisting the pursuers of the negroes, &c., was convicted of the offence at Lexington on the 9th inst., and sentenced to the penitentiary for twenty years. 

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   STAMPEDE FRUSTRATED.––We learn that about forty negroes had made arrangements to leave their masters, in Woodford county, on Saturday night last, but the plot was discovered just in time to defeat its execution. The negroes all had free passes. According to the plan of operations, each was to steal a horse and cross the Ohio river before day. They were betrayed by a negro to whom the plot was disclosed, and who was requested to join in it. The negroes stated that two or three white men who had been in the neighborhood some days, furnished them free passes. These men got an intimation of the discovery of the plot, and made their escape.––Lexington (Ky) Atlas, 9th inst. 

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     The white man Doyle, who figured so largely in the great slave stampede in Kentucky, some time since, resisting the pursuers of the negroes, &c., was convicted of the offence at Lexington, on the 9th instant, and sentenced to the penitentiary for twenty years.

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   Another Stampede--Doyle Convicted.

   The Maysville Herald of Wednesday mentions the discovery and frustration of another negro stampede in Kentucky. Some forty slaves, it states, belonging in Woodford county, had made arrangements to break the bonds of servitude and seek the sweets of liberty, in a free State, on Saturday night. The negroes all had free passes, and, according to general orders each was to steal a horse and thus ride out of the land of bondage. But one of the band proving recreant, their designs were discovered and frustrated. 

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   ANOTHER STAMPEDE––DOYLE CONVICTED.––The Maysville Herald, of Wednesday last, mentions the discovery and frustration of another negro stampede in Kentucky. Some forty slaves, it says, belonging in Woodford county, had made arrangements to break the bonds of servitude, and seek the sweets of liberty in a free State, on Saturday night. The negroes all had free passes, and, according to general orders, were each to steal a horse, and thus ride out of the land of bondage. But one of the band proving recreant, their designs were discovered and frustrated. 

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      Mr. DOYLE, who was engaged in the late Slave Stampede near Lexington Ky. Has been tried for the offence, convicted, and sentenced to twenty years servitude in the Penitentiary.

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   The N.Y. Express states that Mr. DOYLE, who was engaged in the late Slave Stampede near Lexington, Ky., has been tried for the offence, convicted, and sentenced to twenty years servitude in the Penitentiary. 

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    Mr. Doyle, who was engaged in the late Slave Stampede, near Lexington, Ky., has been tried for the offence, convicted, and sentenced to twenty years servitude in the Penitentiary. 

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  STAMPEDE FRUSTRATED. – We learn that about forty negroes had made arrangements to leave their masters in Woodford county on Saturday night last, but the plot was discovered just in time to defeat its execution. The negroes al had free passes. According to the plan of operations, each was to steal a horse and cross the Ohio river before day. They were betrayed by a negro to whom the plan was disclosed, and who was requested to join in it. The  

Article

    ANOTHER STAMPEDE––DOYLE CONVICTED.––The Maysville Herald of Wednesday last mentions the discovery and frustration of another negro stampede in Kentucky. Some forty slaves, it says, belonging in Woodford county, had made arrangements to break the bonds of servitude and seek the sweets of liberty in a free State, on Saturday night. The negroes all had free passes, and, according to general orders, were each to steal a horse, and thus ride out of the land of bondage. But one of the band proving recreant, their designs were discovered and frustrated. 

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   The man Doyle who figured so extensively in the Kentucky slave stampede, has been convicted and sentenced to the Penitentiary for twenty years. 

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ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE IN KENTUCKY. They Maysville Herald of Wednesday week, mentions the discovery and frustration of another negro stampede in Kentucky. Some forty slaves, it says, belonging in Woodford county, had made arrangements to break the bounds of servitude and seek the sweets of liberty in a free State, on Saturday. The negroes all had free passes, and according to general orders, were each to steal a horse, and thus ride out of the land of bondage.

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   Doyle, the Kentucky slave stealer, has been sentenced to the penitentiary for twenty years. Another stampede of forty negroes who had been furnished with free passes by white men, in Woodford county, Ky., has just been frustrated. 

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   Stampede Frustrated––We learn that about forty negroes had made arrangements to leave their masters in Woodford county, on Saturday night last, but the plot was discovered just in time to defeat its execution. The negroes all had free passes. According to the plan of operations, each was to steal a horse and cross the Ohio river before day. They were betrayed by a negro to whom the plot was disclosed, and who was requested to join in it. 

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   CONVICTION OF DOYLE IN KENTUCKY.––The white man Doyle, who figured so largely in the great slave stampede in Kentucky, some time since, resisting the pursuers of the negroes, &c., was convicted of the offence at Lexington on the 9th inst., and sentenced to the penitentiary for twenty years. 

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   Another negro stampede has been frustrated in Kentuckey. Some forty slaves have arranged to steal horses and escape, but were betrayed by one of their number. Patrick Doyle, a white man, engaged in assisting the negroes, who escaped some months since, and were mostly retaken in Ohio, has been sentenced to 20 years in the Penitentiary. 

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   NEGRO STAMPEDE FRUSTRATED.––The Lexington (Ky.) Atlas of the 10th inst. says: "We learn that about forty negroes had made arrangements to leave their masters, in Woodford county, on Saturday night last, but the plot was discovered just in time to defeat its execution. The negroes all had free passes. According to the plan of operations, each was to steal a horse and cross the Ohio river before day. They were betrayed by a negro to whom the plot was disclosed, and who was requested to join in it. The negroes stated that two or three white men, who had been in the neighborhood some days, furnished them free passes. These men got an intimation of the discovery of the plot, and made their escape. 

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              ANOTHER STAMPEDE--DOYLE CONVICTED.

   The Maysville (Ky.) Herald, mentions the discovery and frustration of another negro stampede in Kentucky. Some forty slaves, it states, belonging in Woodford County, had made arrangement to break the bonds of servitude and seek the sweets of liberty, in a free state, on Saturday night last. The negroes all had free passes, and according to general orders each was to steal a horse and thus ride out of the land of bondage. But one of the band proving recreant, their designs were discovered and frustrated.

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Mr. Boyle [Doyle], who was engaged in the slave stampede near Lexington Ky. has been tried for the offense, convicted, and sentenced to twenty years servitude in the penitentiary.

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                          MAYSVILLE, KY., Nov. 1.

            RUNAWAY SLAVES!

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                   Caught in his own Trap.

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   A STAMPEDE.––The Cleveland Plaindealer of Tuesday says that seven run away slaves passed through that city on the day previous, on their way to Canada. 

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             [From the Memphis Herald.]

   SLAVERY EMANCIPATION IN KENTUCKY.––Kentucky being about to take steps for forming a new constitution, the question of fixing a period for the gradual emancipation of her slaves, is now prominently before the people of that State. If the citizens of Kentucky were the only persons affected by this measure, should it be carried into execution, then it were well; but as the citizens of Tennessee and other slave States, bordering on Kentucky, and perhaps the whole South with be seriously injured by it, steps should be taken, at the proper time, to guard against it.

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   A MARTYR, OR A JUDAS?––The Iowa Freeman intimates the opinion that Doyle, the white man recently sentenced to the penitentiary, in Ky., for aiding the Lexington fugitives, is an honest man, and that our suspicions do him injustice. If our western brother will give us any convincing proof of his correctness, we will thankfully acknowledge his kindness, and will hasten to make reparation to an injured man. It is quite enough that one Judas Iscariot has existed: we have no ambition to discover a second. Moral deformity gives us no pleasure, and we thank the man who shows us virtue and goodness where we have only seen vice. But we have too much reason to fear that in this case the facts are no better than we suspected.

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   ANOTHER NEGRO STAMPEDE.––On Saturday night two slaves, a male and female, made tracks from Mrs. Goddard in this city; and it is supposed that several others have left the city and county.––Maysville Flag 20th. 

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   STAMPEDE FRUSTRATED.––We learn that about forty negroes had made arrangements to leave their masters in Woodford county, on Saturday night last, but the plot was discovered just in time to defeat its execution. The negroes all had free passes. According to the plan of operations, each was to steal a horse and cross the Ohio river before day. They were betrayed by a negro to whom the plot was disclosed, and who was requested to join in it.

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[From the Louisville Courrier.]

                            To the citizens of Jefferson County.

   The canvas for the convention has been progressing with spirit for several weeks, and although there have been frequent speakings, yet, because of the busy season, few are familiar with the topics which are discussed. Fearing that some friends may be called on to vote, without having heard what may be said, it is deemed advisable, in this way, to inform them of the sayings for and against the proposed reforms.

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   On our second page we have given a rumor from a Cincinnati paper of a negro stampede in Mason county. The Maysville Eagle of Tuesday afternoon furnishes us with the following additional particulars: 

   They attempted to cross the river, eight in number, in a skiff, about six miles below this city. The load was too heavy for the frail craft, which caused an upset, and four of the number were drowned––two men belonging to E.S. Perry, and two women, one the property of D. Bronaugh, and the other of Andrew Ritchie. The remaining four clung to the bottom of the skiff and called for help. They were relieved by Mr. R. Mitchell, Jr., brought here and lodged in jail. 

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   NEGRO STAMPEDE IN MASON.––The Cincinnati Times of Tuesday evening, says that a gentleman just down from Maysville, reports that a few days since about twenty darkies, men and women, crossed the river and fled from their masters. It is said, in crossing the Ohio three or four were drowned. 

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   THE VIRGINIA RUNAWAYS--Bloody Resistance.––

The Catoctin Whig gives the following account of the recent slave stampede from Jefferson and Petersville, Va.:

   "They were striking a straight course for the Pennsylvania line, but were discovered and arrested about two miles above Wolfsville. It required a strong force to secure them, the men making a desperate resistance, being armed with bowie-knives, dirks, &c. Two young men, Uriah Hurley and –––– Lewis, who assisted in arresting them, received some pretty hard blows and were also badly cut by knives in the hands of the negroes. We understand that the greatest excitement prevailed among the citizens of Wolfsville upon hearing of the bloody resistance made by the runaways."

   At the latest dates, says the Whig, the young men were not expected to recover, being dreadfully lacerated. 

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   STAMPEDE AMONG THE NEGROES OF HARDIN COUNTY.––The Elizabethtown Register of the 12th, says:

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   THE VIRGINIA RUNAWAYS––BLOODY RESISTANCE.

The Catoctin Whig gives the following account of the recent slave stampede from Jefferson and Petersville, Va.:

   "They were striking a straight course for the Pennsylvania line, but were discovered and arrested about two miles above Wolfsville. It required a strong force to secure them, the men making a desperate resistance, being armed with bowie-knives, dirks, &c. Two young men, Uriah Hurley and –––– Lewis, who assisted in arresting them, received some pretty hard blows and were also badly cut by knives in the hands of the negroes. We understand that the greatest excitement prevailed among the citizens of Wolfsville upon hearing of the bloody resistance made by the runaways.

   At the latest dates, says the Whig, the young men were not expected to recover, being dreadfully lacerated. 

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   STAMPEDE.––There is a great commotion among the slave owners of Maryland, in consequence of the large number of slaves who have seen proper to take 'French leave' of their masters, and emigrate into free States. The papers published in border counties come teeming full of advertisements offering rewards for runaways, and editorial notices of the absconding of whole gangs and families of slaves, who are seldom ever caught, and only heard of when safe far north of Mason & Dixon's line. So great has been the loss to planters on the Eastern Shore counties of the State, that the owners of slaves are proposing to construct a line of telegraph through the centre [center] of the counties for the purpose of giving early information to police agents of the flight of their property, and thus aid in their detection. Several instances have occurred lately, of gangs of slaves having run away in one night, and successfully got off, whose value would be from 5,000 to $8,000.

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––A Baltimore correspondent of the N.Y. Tribune says: -

           “I mentioned a few days since, the fact of so large a number of slaves absconding from their mosters [masters]. There appears to be regular stampede among the negroes, not only of Maryland, but Virginia also, for they are running off in droves. Scarce a country paper from this State, or northern or western Virginia, but is full of rewards from the apprehension of runaways or accounts of their recapture – in some instances not without serious rencontres [rencounters] with the pursuers, in which serious wounds have been given and received, and in one or two instances lately, lives lost. The effect of this stampede has been to cause money owners to dispose of their slaves to Southern dealers. The slave population from these two causes will greatly diminish, and I am much mistaken if the next census does not show a considerable decrease.”

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   STAMPEDE AMONG THE KENTUCKY SLAVES.––The Elizabethtown (Ky.) Register, of Wednesday last, says:

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   ANOTHER STAMPEDE.––We learn from the Winchester (Va.) Republican, that ten or twelve negroes left that county on Saturday night, belonging to Messrs. Swann, Stickley, and others. Six of them were retaken, and in the effort they and several white men were severely injured. 

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––FOUR DROWNED.––Seven runaway negroes from Mason county attempted to cross the Ohio in a skiff on the 9th inst. six miles above Maysville. The boat upset and four of the negroes were drowned. The three others, and a slave who they had hired to take them across, saved themselves by clinging to the skiff, until relieved by a Mr. Mitchell, who heard them call for help. They were all taken to jail, and the negro who attempted to ferry them across was tried before a magistrate and sentenced to receive 39 lashes. 

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SLAVE STAMPEDE.  A Baltimore correspondent of the New York Tribune says: “I mentioned a few days since, the fact of so large a number of slaves absconding from their masters. There appears to be a regular stampede among the negroes, not only of Maryland, but of Virginia also, for they are running off in droves. Scarce a country paper from this State, or northern or western Virginia, but is full of rewards for the apprehension of runaways or accounts of their recapture–in some instances not without serious rencontres [reencounters] with the pursuers, in which serious wounds have been given or received, and in one or two instances lately, lives lost. The effect of this stampede has been to cause many owners to dispose of their slaves to Southern dealers. The slave population from these two causes will greatly diminish and I am much mistaken if the next census does not show a considerable decrease.”

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Four Drowned.––Seven runaway negroes from Mason county attempted to cross the Ohio in a skiff, on the 9th inst., six miles above Maysville. The boat upset, and four of the negroes were drowned. The three others, and a slave whom they had hired to take them across, saved themselves by clinging to the skiff until relieved by a Mr. Mitchell, who heard them call for help. They were all taken to jail, and the negro who attempted to ferry them across was tried before a magistrate, and sentenced to receive thirty-nine lashes.

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   THE VIRGINIA RUNAWAYS––BLOODY RESISTANCE––The Catoctin Whig gives the following account of the recent slave stampede from Jefferson and Petersville, Va.:

"They were striking a straight course, for the Pennsylvania line, but were discovered and arrested about two miles above Wolfsville. It required a strong force to secure them, the men making a desperate resistance, being armed with bowie-knives, dirks, &c. Two young men, Uriah Hurley and ---Lewis, who assisted in arresting them, received some pretty hard blows, and were also badly cut by knives in the hands of the negroes. We understood that the greatest excitement prevailed among the citizens of Wolfsville, upon hearing of the bloody resistance made by the runaways."

At the latest dates, says the Whig, the young men were not expected to recover, being dreadfully lacerated.

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   Slave Stampede.––Four Drowned.––Seven runaway negroes from Mason county attempted to cross the Ohio in a skiff on the 9th inst. six miles above Maysville. The boat upset and four of the negroes were drowned. The three others, and a slave who they had hired to take them across, saved themselves by clinging to the skiff, until relieved by a Mr. Mitchell, who heard them call for help. They were all taken to jail, and the negro who attempted to ferry them across was tried before a magistrate and sentenced to receive 39 lashes. 

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Seven runaway negroes from Mason county attempted to cross the Ohio river in a skiff on the 9th ult., six miles above Maysville. The boat upset and four of the negroes were drowned. The three others, and a slave who they had hired to take them across, saved themselves by clinging to the skiff, until relieved by a Mr. Mitchell, who heard them call for help. They were all taken to jail, and the negro who attempted to ferry them across was tried before a magistrate and sentenced to receive 39 lashes.