View All Documents // 1840s // 1850s // 1860s

Displaying 101 - 150 of 1029

Article

   A dispatch from Quincy, Ill., received at St. Louis on the 5th, says:––Fifty negroes, of all ages and both sexes, with teams, started, from the Missouri side the night before. A 2d dispatch says that the slaves who stampeded from Iowa Co., had been overpowered, after a desperate resistance, with the loss of their leader, were captured. 

Article

     Stampede near St. Louis. 

   Fifty slaves were stampeded on Monday, last (5th) from the environs of St. Louis. They were pursued when a severe fight took place, resulting in the recapture and the death of the ringleaders. 

Article

STAMPEDE--The St. Louis papers complain very much about the "stampede" of their negroes, and complain that some of their Illinois neighbors aid them.

Article

   THE LEWIS COUNTY AFFAIR.––The last N.E. Rep'r, after giving an account of the daring attempt made by negroes in that county to escape, says that it has "been ascertained that it was to be a general insurrection; and, to that end, it is believed that nearly all the slaves in the county had notice, and were to have met and rendezvoused at Canton on Friday. The plan was to kill all the negroes who would not join them––and with force of arms move off in a body to Illinois, and thence to Canada. However preposterous the plan may seem, it certainly has a great deal of truth for its foundation. The younger negroes not only disclosed it, but others, who did not join them, acknowledged they were notified and knew of it. Besides, others have made a break.

Article

   A Stampede.––Saturday night six negroes, owned in this city, came up missing at their homes, having taken sudden leave for parts unknown. Recently several gangs have mysteriously ran off, inclining many to believe that they have been stampeded.––St. Louis Republican, Oct. 29. 

Article

   NEGRO STAMPEDE.––Quincy, Nov. 2.––About fifty negroes, men, women and children, with teams, owned by Messrs. Miller, McKim and McCutchin, of Sugar Creek, and William Ellis, of Monticello, Lewis county, Mo., started for parts unknown about 1 o'clock last night. 

Article

   Quincy, Ill., Nov. 6.

SLAVE STAMPEDE.--Last night about 50 negroes of all ages and sexes, with teams, stampeded from the Missouri side of the river. They were overhauled on Saturday morning, and after a desperate resistance, and the loss of their leader, they were captured. 

Article

   THE GREAT SLAVE STAMPEDE IN MISSOURI.––The Canton, Lewis Co., Mo. Reporter, gives the following account of the recent great slave stampede there:

   A great excitement prevails in Lewis county, in regard to the recent attempt of the negroes to run away and rise in insurrection; and as many reports are in circulation in relation thereto, we deem it our duty to publish a true statement of the matter as it occurred. 

Article

   The Slaveholders along the eastern coast of Maryland are greatly excited on account of the frequent stampedes among the negroes. Almost every night, says an exchange, slaves flee from bondage to a land of freedom, where they re-recognized as men and women, not as chattels. 

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––The Martinsburg Gazette says that on Saturday night last six slaves made their escape from that county––two belonged to C.J. Faulkner, Esq., one to D.H. Conrad, Esq., one to John Jamison, Esq., one to J.L. Cunningham, Esq, and one to the estate of Collin Peters, deceased. Eight left Jefferson county on Friday night previous. 

Article

   SLAVERY IN MARYLAND. Speaking the Legislature of Maryland, a correspondent of the Tribune says, that a majority of Reformers have been elected, and a great effort will be made to enact a bill providing for the call of a Convention to remodel the Constitution of the State. The slaveholders in the Eastern and Southern counties have already taken the alarm at the prospect of an effort to provide for emancipation. A movement once made will lead to beneficial results in a few years. There are those in Maryland who will never cease until this curse is eradicated from the soil; and although the final attainment of the object is distant in appearance, there are hearts that never despair, and yet hope to live to witness its accomplishment. 

Article

THE GREAT SLAVE STAMPEDE IN MISSOURI.––

The Canton, Lewis Co., Mo. Reporter, gives the following account of the recent great slave stampede there:

A great excitement prevails in Lewis county, in regard to the recent attempt of the negroes to run away and rise in insurrection; and as many reports are in circulation in relation thereto, we deem it our duty to publish a true statement of the matter as it occurred.

A little before day on Friday morning last, a negro man, belonging to James Miller, came into the house, ostensibly to make a fire. Before going out, Mr. Miller heard him step towards the gun rack, take something, and leave with caution. The circumstance exciting some suspicion in relation thereto, we deem it our duty to publish a true statement of the matter as it occurred.

Article

"HAPPY AND CONTENTED."––SLAVE STAMPEDE. 

A Telegraphic despatch from Quincy, Ill, Nov. 5th, says: "Last night about fifty negroes of all ages and both sexes escaped together from the Missouri side of the river. The slaves were owned by Miss Miller, Mr. McKim and Mr. McCutcheon, of Sugar Creek, and Mr. Ellis, of Monticello, Lewis county. The slaves were overhauled on Saturday morning, and after a desperate resistance and the loss of their leader, they were captured.––The slave who was killed belonged to Miss Miller.

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE IN VIRGINIA.––Eight slaves ran away from Jefferson county, Va., on Friday night last, and six more fled from bondage in the vicinity of Martinsburg on Saturday night. 

Article

      Correspondence of the N.Y. Journal of Commerce.

                 WASHINGTON, Nov. 30, 1849.

   Among the causes of irritation to the Southern men, is the growingly frequent escape of slaves, who are believed to be enticed away. Thus, last Saturday night, some half dozen disappeared from near Martinsburg, Va., and the same night about as many from Talbot county, Maryland. From Jefferson county, also, there was a stampede. Agents are at work to get them off. It is a pity they could not take 100,000 at a haul. They would soon cry enough, and beg they might be taken back. 

   Among the pre-congressional improvements, the Presidential House has not been neglected. New paint and furniture has given it quite an improved aspect. We hope no one will find fault with it.              H.H.H. 

Article

ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE.––The Easton Star states that five slaves made their escape from Talbot county, Md., a few days since. Four belonged to the estate of Edward Martin, Esq., deceased, and one to M.A. Goldsborough, Esq.

Article

           Virginia––Governor's Message.

   We take the following extract from Governor Floyd's message recently transmitted to the legislature of Virginia. The Governor takes high Southern ground, and is very decided, though more temperate than some others, and consequently more efficient in his views. There is none of that gaseous chivalry which made the message of the Governor of South Carolina supremely ridiculous––none of that Bombastes Furioso Quattlebum nonsense which some mothers take to be true bravery, and which probably is, measured by their standard. This is an excellent feature, and one deserving of imitation. Governor Floyd says:

Article

ANOTHER CHAPTER OF SOUTHERN ATROCITIES AND HORRORS.

   The Great Slave Stampede in Missouri.–– The Canton, Lewis county, Mo., Reporter, gives the following account of the recent great slave stampede there:––

   A great excitement prevails in Lewis county, in regard to the recent attempt of the negroes to run away and rise in insurrection; and as many reports are in circulation in relation thereto, we deem it our duty to publish a true statement of the matter as it occurred. 

Article

                     CALIFORNIA, DESERET, AND NEW MEXICO.

Article

We have received a communication in relation to the late "slave stampede" in our neighborhood, of this tenor:

"Rumor may have it, that it was a colored person who betrayed the runaways last week. But unfortunately the one they accuse of having done so started north with a part of the same gang the night before the capture. And this rumor was only to prevent, and may be save the "underground car" from being upset or overtaken. "Justice."

Article

   Messrs. Editors: In your paper of the 22nd inst., there is a communication signed "Justice" which refers to the slave stampede in this neighborhood on the 16th, saying "that it was rumored that a colored person had betrayed the slaves, but, unfortunately, the one they accuse of having done so, started north with a part of the same gang the night before the capture; and this rumor was only to prevent, and may be, to save the underground car from being upset or overtaken." Now, in order correct public sentiment in regard to that man's conduct in this matter, I would refer them to the following certificate of the agent of the northern line of stages:

Springfield, Jan. 22, 1850.

This is to certify that Mr. Jenkins left for Bloomington on the 16th day of January, 1850, in the stage.

J.C. Goodhue, agent.

A Friend to "Justice"

Article

BENTON AND FOOTE.

A rich scene is said to have passed in the Senate on Wednesday, between these redoubtable Democrats.

Col. Benton had introduced a bill defining the boundaries of Texas. Mr. Foote in the papers a bill on the same subject, and with provisions somewhat similar. Mr. Foote, who is always ready to make a three hour speech on any question, thereupon mounted the Missourian and charged him with stealing his thunder. He, Foote, did not steal anything, and he would not allow any body to steal from him. According to the report in the Intelligencer, he proceeded:––Rich. Whig.

Article

          Fruits of the Southern Upas!

   Americans! see here the legitimate fruits of that deadly tree you have so long pruned and cherished, and around which you have thrown the protecting arms of Church and State. It is for an 'institution' bearing such fruits that your priests have 'prophesied lies' in the name of the Lord, and your Statesmen clothed themselves with falsehood as with a garment. It was for the support of this institution that your fathers made 'concessions' and 'compromises,' which their degenerate children have neither the honest nor the courage to repudiate!

        READ!  READ!

THE GREAT SLAVE STAMPEDE IN MISSOURI.––The Canton, Lewis county, Mo. Reporter, gives the following account of the recent great slave stampede there.

Article

WASHINGTON, Monday Evening,

April 22.

Business in the Senate–Petitions for Pay for Fugitive Slaves–Mr. Benton and the Compromise Committee–Charges against Mr. Ewing, in the House. 

Article

   Washington Correspondence

   Washington, May 18, 1850. 

Article

   Telegraphed for the Baltimore Sun

   Washington, May 26--6 P.M

SERIOUS ILLNESS OF SENATOR ELLMORE--CONFIRMATION--SLAVE STAMPEDE

   I regret to inform you that the Hon. Mr. Ellmore, Senator from South Carolina, and successor of the Hon. John C. Calhoun, is not expected to live through the night. His disease is bronchitis, and his case is considered hopeless. 

   Mr. Letcher has been confirmed as Minister to Mexico.

   The abolitionists are at work here. Last night, three domestics in the family of the Hon. Wm. Colcock, of S.C., were spirited away. About twenty slaves have been enticed away from this city and neighborhood.   X.  

Article

   Washington, May 29, 1850. 

   SLAVE STAMPEDE

   The abolitionists are at work here. Last night, three domestics in the family of the Hon. Wm. Colcock, of S.C., were spirited away. About twenty slaves have been enticed away from this city and neighborhood. 

Article

    EDITOR'S CORRESPONDENCE.

  From our Baltimore Correspondent.

              BALTIMORE, June 8––5, p.m.

   Whig Troubles and Disappointments.––Organization of Slaveholders.––Abolition Movements.––The Census-takers.––Troublesome Questions.––The Markets, &c.

Article

MARYLAND SLAVES. A meeting of the slaveholders of Queen Anne's county was held at Centerville a few days since, for the purpose of organizing a society to protect slave property, on account of the numerous depredations that have been made by the abolitionists recently in that vicinity. Officers were elected, and a constitution adopted, and measures taken for immediately commencing operations. The number of slaves weekly lost from the border counties of this State is estimated to be equal to $10,000 in value, and the most efficient organization will be necessary to prevent its increase. That they receive money, arms, and directions from the Abolitionists, there is no manner of doubt; and, after they cross the line, places of concealment are provided for them, with all the 'aid and comfort' necessary to enable them to elude pursuit. The recent stampede of sixteen slaves belonging to Col.

Article

Maryland Slaves. 

   A meeting of the slaveholders of Queen Anne's county was held at Centreville a few days since, for the purpose of organizing a society to protect slave property, on account of the numerous depredations that have been made by the abolitionists recently in that vicinity. Officers were elected and a constitution adopted, and measures taken for immediately commencing operations. 

   The number of slaves weekly lost from the border counties of this state is estimated to be equal to $10,000 in value, and the most efficient organization will be necessary to prevent is increase. That they receive money, arms, and directions from the abolitionists, there is no manner of doubt--and after they cross the line, places of concealment are provided for them, with all the "aid and comfort" necessary to enable them to elude pursuit. 

Article

A Stampede -- The Clearspring (Md.) Sentinel states that eight slaves were seen crossing the mountains west of that [illegible] during the past week. They were all in a gang, and belonged to the citizens of the southern part of Virginia. --- ib.

Article

    STAMPEDE.––The Pittsburg Intelligencer says several slaves, belonging to Messrs. Toombs and Stephens, were enticed off by the abolitionists on Saturday night, the 27th ult. 

Article

   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE AND CONFLICT. Baltimore, Aug. 9.––Five runaway slaves were brought here this morning in the Susquehannah cars from Pennsylvania. They were those who had absconded from different counties in this State. It being ascertained that the runaways were secreted in the farm of colored man one mile across the Pennsylvania line, a party proceeded there with a view to the capture of the men.

   They succeeded in arresting seven of them. In passing through Sprattsburgh, some abolitionists, headed by Postmaster Brown, made an attempt at recapture and rescued two of the slaves.

Article

   Another Slave Stampede at Baltimore.-- Seven runaway slaves were re-captured by a party from Baltimore, on Thursday, at a place a mile across the Pennsylvania line. As they were returning with them through Sprattsburgh, some abolitionists made a rush at them, and rescued two of the slaves. After a smart contest in which one of the slaves wounded himself in attempting to shoot his captor, the five were brought to Baltimore in irons. 

Article

SLAVE STAMPEDES.––On our fourth page will be found an account from one of our Washington correspondents, of a slave stampede in Washington, accompanied by quite a serious fight between the runaways and their captors, and the abolition agent, who had them in charge. There will also be found in our local column an account of the capture of another party of runaways at Shrewsbury, Pa.

Article

Our Baltimore Correspondence

BALTIMORE, August 10, 1850

A Nest of Runaway Slaves Captured by Pennsylvanians -- A Recreant Postmaster - Fruits of Abolitionism - New Underground Railroad - Melancholy Suicide, &c.

The excitement in this vicinity relative to the recent movement of abolitionists, in stampeding slaves, is very great, as large numbers have recently been spirited away.

Article

ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE. Baltimore; Aug 9. Five runaway slaves were brought here this morning in the Susquehanna cars from Pennsylvania. The runaways were secreted on the farm of a colored man, one mile across the Pennsylvania line, and a party proceeded there with a view to their capture. They succeeded in arresting seven of them. In passing through Sprattsburgh, some Abolitionists, headed by Postmaster Brown, made an attempt at recapture, and rescued two of the slaves. Mr. Brown was knocked down,

Article

                        Correspondence of the Courier.

                            BALTIMORE, AUG. 10––9 P.M.

   Our city still continues very healthy, but as the cholera is prevailing to somewhat an alarming extent almost in our immediate neighbourhood yet still our city is free from it, prompt measures should be taken by our city authorities and the citizens also to prevent its ravages amongst us, although our city escaped almost by a miracle last year. Latest accounts from Harper's Ferry and Uniontown state the disease has somewhat abated, but that there was a good deal of sickness yet, the greatest excitement prevailed and the inhabitants were leaving for the country. 

   The weather has been delightful to-day, and from the present appearance of the skies, we will in all probability have rain before morning. 

Article

   A Stampede.––The Clearspring, (Md.) Sentinel states that eight slaves were seen crossing the mountains west of that place during the past week. They were all in a gang, and belonged to the citizens of the southern part of Virginia. 

Article

Another Slave Stampede and Conflict.––Baltimore, Aug. 9.––Five runaway Slaves were bro't [brought] here this morning in the Susquehannah cars from Pennsylvania. They were those who had absconded from different counties in this State. It being ascertained that the runaways were secreted on the farm of a colored man one mile across the Pennsylvania line, a party proceeded there with a view to the capture of the men.

They succeeded in arresting seven of them. In passing through Sprattsburg, some abolitionists headed by Postmaster Brown, made an attack at recapture, and rescued two of the Slaves.

Mr. Brown was knocked down, and the five Slaves retained were put in irons and brought to this city, where they were lodged in jail this morning to await the arrival of their owners. One of the slaves in attempting to shoot his captor, wounded himself.

Article

   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE.––It will be seen by our "Mercury" letter from Washington, that the underground railroad is still in active employment by the abolitionists, there having been some 30 or 40 slaves run off from Prince George's county, in this State, in the last few days. If Mr. Pratt's amendments to the fugitive slave bill should pass Congress, by which all the unrecovered stolen or abducted slaves are to be paid for, these things may not then be so frequent, as the Government will then have a more direct interest in checking these unlawful proceedings on the part of certain citizens of free States.––Balt. Sun. 

Article

ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE.--About forty slaves from the vicinity of Prince George's County, absconded on Sunday last, and the pursuit of them has so far proved unsuccessful.

Article

        A large Abolition Convention is being held at Cazenovia, at which upwards of 2000 delegates are present. Fred. Douglass has been elected President. Various resolutions and addresses have been passed, of the usual character, and urging slaves to escaped at all hazards. Subscriptions were set on foot to present a testimonial of approbation to Chaplin, who was concerned in the slave stampede at Washington, and to defend him in his coming trial, for attempting to liberate the slaves of Messrs. Toombs and Stevens.

Article

SLAVE STAMPEDES. In all the Slave States bordering on the Free States, every now and then there is a regular stampede, or an uprising and fleeing from bondage of a large number of slaves, so many and such extensive ones as to render it certain that in several of the States slavery is on the decrease. Every day adds to the depreciating of slave property in all the exposed States, as its tendency to walk off lessens its value greatly. Slavery is dying out in several of the States.

Article

STAMPEDES.––Almost every mail brings intelligence of the escape of slaves from the border slave States. Thirty-five are reported to have left a single county in Maryland in one day last week, and about a dozen from other places in the same State in the course of the week. Scarcely a day passes that such attempts are not made, successful, and the number is supposed to be very large that have resorted to this method of establishing their right to themselves during the summer in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia.-Anti-Slavery Standard

Article

Another Slave Stampede.––It will be seen by our “Mercury” letter from Washington, that the underground railroad is still in active employment by the abolitionists, there having been some 30 or 40 slaves run off Prince George’s country, in this State, in the last few days. If Mr. Pratt’s amendments to the fugitive slave bill should pass Congress, by which all the unrecovered stolen or abducted slaves are to be paid for, these things may not then be so frequent, as Government will then have a more direct interest in checking these unlawful proceedings on the part of certain citizens of free States––Balt. Sun.

Article

   Great Excitement in Pittsburgh––Stampede of Fugitive Slaves, &c.

                              PITTSBURGH, Sept. 25. 

   About one hundred and fifty fugitive slaves have left here for the British Provinces since the excitement. Rumors are flying about that large parties of slave catchers are in town. 

   The North Western Bank [is] in bad repute, and many persons refuse to take the notes. 

Article

[Telegraphed for the Baltimore Sun.]

Excitement among the Colored Population––Effect of the Fugitive Slave Bill, &c.

PITTSBURG, Sept. 21.––There is some excitement here among colored people, owing to the passage by Congress of the fugitive slave bill, and the power it gives to the slave owner to enter the free States and take possession of his runaway property wherever he finds it. Many of them are preparing to leave for Canada in order to escape from those that they expect will soon be in pursuit of them.–– On Saturday, a large number of them left the city, and some of the first hotels are left very bare of servants by this sudden movement. Many have gone who were never suspected of being fugitives until the passage of this bill, and many others are preparing to join in the general stampede.

Article

                                Stampedes.

   Almost every mail brings intelligence of the escape of slaves from the border slave States.––Thirty-five are reported to have left a single county in Maryland in one day last week, and about a dozen from other places in the same State in the course of a week. Scarcely a day passes that such attempts are not made, successful and unsuccessful, and the number is supposed to be very large that have resorted to this method of establishing their right to themselves during the summer in Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia.––Anti Slavery Standard.