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   A QUEER FUNERAL.–– A correspondent of the Norwich (Conn,) Examiner writes:––

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   Still another slave stampede came off a few miles below Maysville, on Wednesday night last. Five negroes––three of them very fair and delicate mulatto girls––succeeded in crossing the river. All trace was lost a few miles back of Ripley, Brown county.––Cin. Commercial.

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   Slave Stampede.––The slaves in Mason county, Va., are becoming migratory in their habits. Within the last fortnight, eight have made their escape to parts unknown. They were the property of Messrs. Beale, Bateman, Capehart and Mrs. Lewis. 

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   CLEAR THE TRACK!––THE TRAIN IS COMING!

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   RUNAWAY NEGROES.––But a short time since we chronicled the running away of a number of negroes from this county, under circumstances which induced the belief that some person or persons well acquainted with the best mode of effecting the escape of fugitives, were deeply concerned in the matter. We are again called upon to notice a similar movement, but more alarming in extent. On Saturday evening six slaves belonging to Mr. Albert G. Johnson, of this county, (one man, one woman, and four children,) one man belonging ot John T. Redd, Esq., of this place, one belonging ot Mr. Rufus Matthews, a servant man of Mr. J.K. Taylor's, one of Mr. Caleb Taylor's, and one of Mrs. Hopkin's, (living with Mr. John Gwyan, of Lewis county,)––eleven in all––and all of this county, escaped. This is somewhat alarming, so far as the extent of the movement is concerned.

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   FUGITIVES' FUNERAL. – A correspondent of the Norwich (Connecticut) Examiner writes––"Between fifteen and twenty slaves commenced a stampede from one of the Southern States not long since, and arrived safely in a city of the West, which is somewhat famous as a gateway out of the house of bondage, when to their utter consternation, they found that their movements had been anticipated, and every avenue from the city was watched day and night for their apprehension. What was to be done? It was hard to think of going back. Scouts reported that it was impossible to elude the vigilance of a well paid, numerous and unscrupulous police, which was surrounding the city as a body guard. Those who think colored people do not know enough to take care of themselves, would have given their case up as hopeless. But no so they.

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                                                                                             Negro Stealing.

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A STAMPEDE. The Chicago Tribune of the 7th, states that it received a telegraphic dispatch from Quincy, informing them that thirteen negroes, men, women, and children, had left Marion County, Missouri, by the underground railroad, for parts unknown.

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   Grand Stampede.––Thirteen negroes, including men, women and children, left Marion county, Missouri, on last Monday for parts unknown. 

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   A meeting of the citizens of Marion county, Mo., was held at Palmyra on monday last, and a society to be called the "Marion Association," formed. The preamble to the constitution states that "by the action of the Abolitionists, our rights and property are eminently endangered," and that the society is formed for the purpose of mutual protection and safety––and to provide for the means of pursuing slaves when escaped. A Patrol is organized, which upon information of the escape of any slaves, is to proceed in pursuit. Each members is to file with the Treasurer a complete description of his slave property, with every mark of recognition, to enable the patrol to identify it. The association hold another meeting to day.  

Diary

December 5 [year not given] within a month past, there has been a great stir, advertising, telegraphing, and hunting property from Missouri.  Oh, what a spectacle!  Eleven pieces of property, walking in Indian file, armed and equipped facing the North Star!  $3000.00 offered for their apprehension, after they were safe in Canada!  The hunters say they must have gone from Mendon to Jacksonville on a new track.

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   MISREPRESENTATION.––We have been told that a few persons in Quincy, construe an editorial in our Daily of Friday last into something like an intimation that we would justify lawless attacks upon abolitionists, by way of retribution for their supposed connexion with slave stampedes from the other side of the river. We call this misrepresentation because it is either that or misunderstanding and we know that no one could misunderstand the article on anything like a careful reading. We denounce lawless acts no matter by whom committed. We stated positively that we did not believe that any citizen of Quincy had anything to do with the recent runaway case––and yet we are told that we would "justify lawless retribution upon citizens of Quincy" for––offenses not committed. It strikes us that those who are so ready to find fault might be a little more consistent.

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   The Cincinnati Commercial of Wednesday last, says: Another stampede among the slaves has taken place in Covington. On night before last, nine of them took the underground road and started for the Provinces of her British Majesty.  When last heard of they were making good time through the little town of Cumminsville in this county. 

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   Slave stampedes in Kentucky are alarmingly frequent. 

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   Another stampede among the slaves has taken place in Covington. On night before last, nine of them took the underground road and started for the Provinces of her British Majesty. When last heard of, they were making good time through the little town of Cumminsville, in this country. Five of the slaves, we understand, were the property of Mayor Foley, and had uniformly been well treated. It only goes to show that the slave always longs for freedom, and however well you treat him, will take the "underground road" when a fair opportunity is offered.––Cin. Com.

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                  GOING BACK TO SLAVERY.

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             Marion Association. 

   At a meeting of the Marion Association held at the Court House on Monday the 2d of January, the following among other proceedings were had––Judge Brown offered the following preamble and resolutions for the consideration of the meeting, which were on motion adopted:

WHEREAS, it is foreign to our purposes to participate directly or indirectly in the political partizan conflicts of the country nevertheless, for the purpose of more fully explaining the nature of this Association, and that our objects and aims may be not either misunderstood or misrepresented, we deem it proper and right to make the following declaration:

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   A communication in the Louisville Courier, some time since, concerning a negro plot in Henry county, Kentucky, one feature of which was that several white persons were to be murdered, and some robbing done by slaves, and then a stampede made for Canada, and which was widely copied and commented upon, is pronounced by a writer from the same neighborhood to the same paper, to have been a gross misrepresentation of the whole affair, and to have magnified the original facts immensely. The conspiracy instead of extending through a whole community of slaves, was confined to be a single family, and the object was not to murder any one but simply to prevent one of their number from being sold. The negroes who were found to be engaged in some mind of a plot, were inhumanely excoriated and confiscated to more lies than truth.

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             Prompt Proceedings. 

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            For Frederick Douglass' Paper.

   LETTER FROM JOHN W. LEWIS.

     ST. ALBANS, Vt., April 12th, 1854.

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                Fugitive Slave Police.

   In order to establish such a police as would effectually break up the escape of negroes in coasting craft, the State should purchase one or more small and fast-sailing vessels, and station them near the Capes. The expense would be inconsiderable, compared with the saving. One stampede of negroes, such as has lately occurred here in Richmond, costs more than the purchase, manning, and support of two such vessels for five years. 

   A river police would be useless, for no examination of vessels, at any point short of the Capes, can afford an entire safeguard against the escape of slave property. 

                       [Richmond Dispatch. 

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                              The Underground Railroad. 

   Not the least important of all the great railroad enterprises which are rapidly, but almost imperceptibly, effecting great changes in the condition of the country and in the social and political relations of the States towards each other, is that mysterious organization called the "Underground Railroad." As its managers publish no annual or quarterly statements of its operations, and its stock is not being recognized by the Bulls and Bears of Wall-street, it is not half so much talked about as many other Roads which are not, in truth, of half so much importance. 

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     Look out for Negro Stealers. 

   Six negroes left their master, Mr. H.B. Morris living two miles north of St. Joseph, on Tuesday night, and if they have not already crossed the river are concealed in this vicinity awaiting an opportunity to do so. Look out for them, and let all good citizens be on the alert. If we are not greatly mistaken Abolitionists and Negro Stealers are about. A citizen of St. Joseph followed a fugitive slave on Tuesday and took him from an emigrants wagon between this place and Savannah. The excuse offered by the individual in whose possession the Slave was found, was that he took him up as a runaway and intended putting him in Andrew County Jail.––The excuse was only plausible, but as no testimony to the contrary could be produced, the man was permitted to pass on. The negro was brought back to the owner.––[St. Joseph Cycle 21st.

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   Respect for the Compromises of 1850

   The following article is found in the Chicago Tribune––a paper which has been constantly prating about the sanctity of the Compromises of 1850 and 1820, but which has never missed an opportunity of glorifying over the violation of either as in the present case. The editor of the Free Democrat is now under bonds to answer at the next term of the United States Court, for his participation in a mob, by which the "Fugitive Slave Law" was violated, and a negro, the slave of Mr. Garland of this county, rescued from the jail and the custody of officers of the State.––[Republican.

               U.G.R.R.

   We find the following article in the Milwaukee Free Democrat of a late date. It is refreshing. 

   The Missouri Republican of March, contains the following advertisement:

    "ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

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            The Boston Fugitive Slave Case.

DISGRACEFUL MOB--ATTACK ON THE COURT-HOUSE--UNITED STATES OFFICER KILLED--THE GOVERNMENT TROOPS CALLED OUT--MANY ARRESTS MADE--ADDRESS FROM THE MAYOR TO THE MOB.

   We announced a few days ago that Anthony Burns, a fugitive slave belonging to Mr. Charles F. Suttle, of Alexandria, Va., who ran away in March last, was arrested in Boston, on Wednesday evening last. On the following day he was brought before U.S. commissioner Loring, when Mr. Brent testified as follows:

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   SLAVE ABDUCTED.––A mulatto man, who calls himself Francis Stames, has been arrested on a charge of abducting the slave of Mr. Robinson, who lives in the northern part of the city. He had previously got the slave on one of the Alton packets, but the Captain, suspecting all was not right, before he landed at Alton, handcuffed him and brought him back to this city, and placed him in the possession of the police. On the trial of the case, the slave produced some free papers, which subsequently proved to be forged, and he was discharged. Afterwards he agains tarted back, but his master heard of the transaction, and officer Melvin was sent in pursuit and arrested him in Bloomington and brought him back to this city and handed him over to his master. 

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   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE.––On Sunday night, the 28th inst., the people of Falmouth had a great stampede among their negroes. Some twenty have left that vicinity. Ten belonging to Mr. A. Robins, six to Mr. Charles A. Aulick, and several others, are among the missing. Their departure was discovered early in the night. They were immediately pursued. Louisville Courier.

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   NEGRO STAMPEDE.––Forty negroes out of fifty, employed by one of the contractors on the Clarksville and Ridgeway railroad, ran off on Sunday last, near Lynesville, N.C., and have not since been heard of. 

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   STAMPEDE OF NEGROES.––During the night of Tuesday, twenty-three negroes, belonging to gentlemen in Grant county, absconded. They got away by seizing several canoes in the Licking river, in which they floated to the Ohio, and finally landed upon the foreign side of the river some distance below Cincinnati. 

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   STAMPEDE.––Three negroes, one belonging to Col. D. Irvine and two to Mr. Samuel Stone, in the vicinity of Richmond, Madison county, left for parts unknown, on Saturday night last

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   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––During Tuesday night twenty-three negroes owned in Grant and adjoining counties, left their master's roofs, escaped to the Licking river where they lashed together several canoes, and in disguise they rowed down the Licking river to the Ohio and crossed, where they disembarked and made a circuitous route to the northern part of Cincinnati. Early Wednesday morning they were run off on the route of Canada by the underground railroad. 

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FUGITIVE SLAVES. – The Cincinnati Gazette states that the nine Fugitive Slaves, seized near that city on Wednesday night last, were from Boone County, Ky, and on their way to Canada. They were on foot, their baggage on their backs; their clothing torn and ragged, and their appearance deplorable. Four of them were men, two women, and three children. They will probably be remanded to Slavery, and like Burns, who was “so glad to get back” to Maryland, “sent further South to a new Market.”

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STAMPEDE OF SLAVES. –  During last Tuesday night twenty- three negroes, owned in Grant and adjoining counties, left their masters’ roofs, and escape to the Licking river, where they lashed together several canoes, and in disguise they rowed down the licking river to the Ohio and crossed, where they were disembarked and made a circuitous route to the northern part of Cincinnati. Early Wednesday morning they were run off on the route to Canada by the underground railroad. – Louisville Journal.

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   Information has been received here by the department on nine fugitive slaves who made a stampede, with twenty others to Ohio. They were arrested and peaceably surrendered and are now in Kentucky. The law was triumphantly sustained.

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   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––During Tuesday night, twenty-three negroes owned in Grant and adjoining counties, left their master's roofs, and escaped to Licking River, where they lashed together several canoes, and in disguise they rowed down the Licking River to the Ohio, and thence down to a point near the Sylvan House, where they disembarked, and made a circuitous route to the northern part of the city. Early yesterday morning, they were run off on the route to Canada, by the underground railway.––Cin. Atlas. 

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   Stampede of Negroes.––Forty negroes, out of fifty, employed by one of the contractors on the Clarksville and Ridgway Railroad, ran off last Sunday week, and have not since been heard from.    Good!

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––A few days ago, seven slaves escaped from Maysville, Ky.

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   STAMPEDE OF NEGROES.––Forty negroes, out of fifty, employed by one of the contractors on the Clarksville and Ridgway Railroad, ran off last Sunday week, and have not since been heard from. Good!

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                             ACROSS THE RIVER.

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                 Patrol.

   We have heard among our citizens of late much complaint, in regard to the unlicensed conduct of our slave population, and have been frequently asked "do our statute books contain any patrol law, and if they do, why is it not enforced by our officers?"

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   we have been very anxious to know, upon what authority our Missouri neighbors charge that slave stampedes originate in Quincy. We have called for the evidence and called in vain. "Dr. Patton of the Quincy Ferry" throws a little light on the subject. He says that the reason why some of the Missourians suspected Mr. Harper of being an "underground railroad man" was the statement of a slave to that effect.––Such, probably, is the only evidence they get against the citizens of Quincy––and that's the reason why they are ashamed to furnish the grounds of their suspicion. Now as they set on foot and carried out a plan to detect Mr. Harper, and found that the "nigger" on whose authority they suspected him, lied, isn't it barely possible Dr. that the "niggers" who have been telling those stories bout Quincy folks may have lied too.––Was it the same "nigger" or another "nigger?" Lets have the witness. We wasn't to cross-examine him, Bring on your "nigger!"

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       OVER THE RIVER AGAIN

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               Slave Stampede.

   CINCINNATI, SEPTEMBER 6.–Nine slaves absconded from Boone county, Kentucky, on Sunday. They are supposed to be concealed in this city.

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 STAMPEDE OF SLAVES––FATAL DUEL ON ACCOUNT OF A YOUNG LADY.

   CINCINNATI, Sept. 6––Nine slaves, who absconded from Kentucky on Sunday, are, it is believed, concealed in this place. 

   A young man named Short, a resident of this city, was killed in a duel by a lawyer named Peacock, on Monday. The quarrel originated in some difficulty about a girl whom Short was going to marry. 

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           Slave Stampede.

   CINCINNATI, Sept. 6.––Nine slaves absconded from Boone county, Ky., on Sunday. They are supposed to be concealed in this city. 

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                      The Underground Railroad.

   The Muscatine Journal, speaking of a recent Slave Stampede in Northern Missouri and an unsuccessful effort to overtake the fugitives, says:

   To escape from such a pursuit with so little advantage in the start, seems to urge the existence of that mysterious structure, the "Underground Railroad." If it is in operation, it is wrong. Slaves are very well satifised with their situation and in many cases are nor benefited by the change, while these occurrences tend to nourish a dangerous feeling of hostility in one section towards another. The Abolitionists may in this way procure the freedom of some negroes, but they cause the masters of many more to sell them into worse slavery, farther South. All the slaves in the neighborhoods whence these negroes escaped are supposed to have known of the matter beforehand, and will be encouraged by the result. 

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   RUNAWAYS.––We noticed last week that a stampede had taken place among the blacks in the neighborhood of Dover, and that it was suspected that whitemen were concerned in inducing slaves in that locality to leave their masters. In this we are not mistaken. A meeting was held on Saturday last at Dover, the object of which was to institute strict inquiry into the matter, which, we are told, resulted in a conviction on the part of the meeting, that slaves had been tampered with by a party of Jewish peddlers, who have their headquarters in, or about Dover. It was shown that these men had not only afforded money upon which to make their escape, but had also furnished them with maps, with the roads to be traveled marked out, with such other directions and information as they deemed useful to runaways. Under these circumstances the men were ordered by the meeting to leave the county speedily, which, we understand, they declined to do.

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   RUNAWAY.––We noticed last week that a stampede had taken place among the blacks in the neighborhood of Dover, and that it was suspected that whitemen were concerned in inducing slaves in that locality to leave their masters. In this we are not mistaken. A meeting was held on Saturday last at Dover, the object of which was to institute strict inquiry into the matter, which, we are told, resulted in a conviction on the part of the meeting, that slaves had been tampered with by a party of Jewish peddlers, who have their headquarters in, or about Dover. It was shown that these men had not only afforded money upon which to make their escape, but had also furnished them with maps, with the roads to be traveled marked out, with such other directions and information as they deemed useful to runaways. Under these circumstances the men were ordered by the meeting to leave the county speedily, which, we understand, they declined to do.

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   STAMPEDE AMONG THE AFRICANS.––On Sunday night last some fifteen or twenty slaves departed this city for the colder climates of the north. It is generally supposed that they absconded under the advice and control of the very efficient underground railroad agents, who seem to hold place and profit in this city. 

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   AFRICAN EXODUS.––A considerable number of passengers on the Underground Railroad, started from this city en route for Chicago, or some other Abolition region, on Sunday night. We understand that among the lot were six belonging to R.J. Gray, three to P. Chouteau, three to Emmanuel Block, and one to Mr. Merritt, of the firm of Warne & Merritt, and one belonging to Captain Smith, making fourteen in all that are heard from, and the supposition is that there are several others in the gang. The authorities of our city cannot be too particular in watching and punishing the emissaries of Abolitionism, both black and white, that are known to be in our midst.