Our database contains over 1,000 newspaper articles that specifically label a group escape as a "slave stampede" or some related variant, such as "negro stampede." Our document records also include hundreds of other types of primary sources and newspaper articles related to these stampedes but that do not contain the word itself. The map below provides a sample visualization of the newspaper coverage between 1856 and 1860 with clickable access to the various records inside our database. The detailed listing underneath includes records for all of the documents from the period 1847 to 1865, containing both transcripts and original images.

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Article

   Respect for the Compromises of 1850

   The following article is found in the Chicago Tribune––a paper which has been constantly prating about the sanctity of the Compromises of 1850 and 1820, but which has never missed an opportunity of glorifying over the violation of either as in the present case. The editor of the Free Democrat is now under bonds to answer at the next term of the United States Court, for his participation in a mob, by which the "Fugitive Slave Law" was violated, and a negro, the slave of Mr. Garland of this county, rescued from the jail and the custody of officers of the State.––[Republican.

               U.G.R.R.

   We find the following article in the Milwaukee Free Democrat of a late date. It is refreshing. 

   The Missouri Republican of March, contains the following advertisement:

    "ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD.

Article

            The Boston Fugitive Slave Case.

DISGRACEFUL MOB--ATTACK ON THE COURT-HOUSE--UNITED STATES OFFICER KILLED--THE GOVERNMENT TROOPS CALLED OUT--MANY ARRESTS MADE--ADDRESS FROM THE MAYOR TO THE MOB.

   We announced a few days ago that Anthony Burns, a fugitive slave belonging to Mr. Charles F. Suttle, of Alexandria, Va., who ran away in March last, was arrested in Boston, on Wednesday evening last. On the following day he was brought before U.S. commissioner Loring, when Mr. Brent testified as follows:

Article

   SLAVE ABDUCTED.––A mulatto man, who calls himself Francis Stames, has been arrested on a charge of abducting the slave of Mr. Robinson, who lives in the northern part of the city. He had previously got the slave on one of the Alton packets, but the Captain, suspecting all was not right, before he landed at Alton, handcuffed him and brought him back to this city, and placed him in the possession of the police. On the trial of the case, the slave produced some free papers, which subsequently proved to be forged, and he was discharged. Afterwards he agains tarted back, but his master heard of the transaction, and officer Melvin was sent in pursuit and arrested him in Bloomington and brought him back to this city and handed him over to his master. 

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   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE.––On Sunday night, the 28th inst., the people of Falmouth had a great stampede among their negroes. Some twenty have left that vicinity. Ten belonging to Mr. A. Robins, six to Mr. Charles A. Aulick, and several others, are among the missing. Their departure was discovered early in the night. They were immediately pursued. Louisville Courier.

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   STAMPEDE OF NEGROES.––During the night of Tuesday, twenty-three negroes, belonging to gentlemen in Grant county, absconded. They got away by seizing several canoes in the Licking river, in which they floated to the Ohio, and finally landed upon the foreign side of the river some distance below Cincinnati. 

Article

   NEGRO STAMPEDE.––Forty negroes out of fifty, employed by one of the contractors on the Clarksville and Ridgeway railroad, ran off on Sunday last, near Lynesville, N.C., and have not since been heard of. 

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   STAMPEDE.––Three negroes, one belonging to Col. D. Irvine and two to Mr. Samuel Stone, in the vicinity of Richmond, Madison county, left for parts unknown, on Saturday night last

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   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––During Tuesday night twenty-three negroes owned in Grant and adjoining counties, left their master's roofs, escaped to the Licking river where they lashed together several canoes, and in disguise they rowed down the Licking river to the Ohio and crossed, where they disembarked and made a circuitous route to the northern part of Cincinnati. Early Wednesday morning they were run off on the route of Canada by the underground railroad. 

Article

FUGITIVE SLAVES. – The Cincinnati Gazette states that the nine Fugitive Slaves, seized near that city on Wednesday night last, were from Boone County, Ky, and on their way to Canada. They were on foot, their baggage on their backs; their clothing torn and ragged, and their appearance deplorable. Four of them were men, two women, and three children. They will probably be remanded to Slavery, and like Burns, who was “so glad to get back” to Maryland, “sent further South to a new Market.”

Article

STAMPEDE OF SLAVES. –  During last Tuesday night twenty- three negroes, owned in Grant and adjoining counties, left their masters’ roofs, and escape to the Licking river, where they lashed together several canoes, and in disguise they rowed down the licking river to the Ohio and crossed, where they were disembarked and made a circuitous route to the northern part of Cincinnati. Early Wednesday morning they were run off on the route to Canada by the underground railroad. – Louisville Journal.

Article

   Information has been received here by the department on nine fugitive slaves who made a stampede, with twenty others to Ohio. They were arrested and peaceably surrendered and are now in Kentucky. The law was triumphantly sustained.

Article

   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––During Tuesday night, twenty-three negroes owned in Grant and adjoining counties, left their master's roofs, and escaped to Licking River, where they lashed together several canoes, and in disguise they rowed down the Licking River to the Ohio, and thence down to a point near the Sylvan House, where they disembarked, and made a circuitous route to the northern part of the city. Early yesterday morning, they were run off on the route to Canada, by the underground railway.––Cin. Atlas. 

Article

   Stampede of Negroes.––Forty negroes, out of fifty, employed by one of the contractors on the Clarksville and Ridgway Railroad, ran off last Sunday week, and have not since been heard from.    Good!

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––A few days ago, seven slaves escaped from Maysville, Ky.

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   STAMPEDE OF NEGROES.––Forty negroes, out of fifty, employed by one of the contractors on the Clarksville and Ridgway Railroad, ran off last Sunday week, and have not since been heard from. Good!

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                             ACROSS THE RIVER.

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                 Patrol.

   We have heard among our citizens of late much complaint, in regard to the unlicensed conduct of our slave population, and have been frequently asked "do our statute books contain any patrol law, and if they do, why is it not enforced by our officers?"

Article

   we have been very anxious to know, upon what authority our Missouri neighbors charge that slave stampedes originate in Quincy. We have called for the evidence and called in vain. "Dr. Patton of the Quincy Ferry" throws a little light on the subject. He says that the reason why some of the Missourians suspected Mr. Harper of being an "underground railroad man" was the statement of a slave to that effect.––Such, probably, is the only evidence they get against the citizens of Quincy––and that's the reason why they are ashamed to furnish the grounds of their suspicion. Now as they set on foot and carried out a plan to detect Mr. Harper, and found that the "nigger" on whose authority they suspected him, lied, isn't it barely possible Dr. that the "niggers" who have been telling those stories bout Quincy folks may have lied too.––Was it the same "nigger" or another "nigger?" Lets have the witness. We wasn't to cross-examine him, Bring on your "nigger!"

Article

       OVER THE RIVER AGAIN

Article

               Slave Stampede.

   CINCINNATI, SEPTEMBER 6.–Nine slaves absconded from Boone county, Kentucky, on Sunday. They are supposed to be concealed in this city.

Article

           Slave Stampede.

   CINCINNATI, Sept. 6.––Nine slaves absconded from Boone county, Ky., on Sunday. They are supposed to be concealed in this city. 

Article

 STAMPEDE OF SLAVES––FATAL DUEL ON ACCOUNT OF A YOUNG LADY.

   CINCINNATI, Sept. 6––Nine slaves, who absconded from Kentucky on Sunday, are, it is believed, concealed in this place. 

   A young man named Short, a resident of this city, was killed in a duel by a lawyer named Peacock, on Monday. The quarrel originated in some difficulty about a girl whom Short was going to marry. 

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                      The Underground Railroad.

   The Muscatine Journal, speaking of a recent Slave Stampede in Northern Missouri and an unsuccessful effort to overtake the fugitives, says:

   To escape from such a pursuit with so little advantage in the start, seems to urge the existence of that mysterious structure, the "Underground Railroad." If it is in operation, it is wrong. Slaves are very well satifised with their situation and in many cases are nor benefited by the change, while these occurrences tend to nourish a dangerous feeling of hostility in one section towards another. The Abolitionists may in this way procure the freedom of some negroes, but they cause the masters of many more to sell them into worse slavery, farther South. All the slaves in the neighborhoods whence these negroes escaped are supposed to have known of the matter beforehand, and will be encouraged by the result. 

Article

   RUNAWAYS.––We noticed last week that a stampede had taken place among the blacks in the neighborhood of Dover, and that it was suspected that whitemen were concerned in inducing slaves in that locality to leave their masters. In this we are not mistaken. A meeting was held on Saturday last at Dover, the object of which was to institute strict inquiry into the matter, which, we are told, resulted in a conviction on the part of the meeting, that slaves had been tampered with by a party of Jewish peddlers, who have their headquarters in, or about Dover. It was shown that these men had not only afforded money upon which to make their escape, but had also furnished them with maps, with the roads to be traveled marked out, with such other directions and information as they deemed useful to runaways. Under these circumstances the men were ordered by the meeting to leave the county speedily, which, we understand, they declined to do.

Article

   RUNAWAY.––We noticed last week that a stampede had taken place among the blacks in the neighborhood of Dover, and that it was suspected that whitemen were concerned in inducing slaves in that locality to leave their masters. In this we are not mistaken. A meeting was held on Saturday last at Dover, the object of which was to institute strict inquiry into the matter, which, we are told, resulted in a conviction on the part of the meeting, that slaves had been tampered with by a party of Jewish peddlers, who have their headquarters in, or about Dover. It was shown that these men had not only afforded money upon which to make their escape, but had also furnished them with maps, with the roads to be traveled marked out, with such other directions and information as they deemed useful to runaways. Under these circumstances the men were ordered by the meeting to leave the county speedily, which, we understand, they declined to do.

Article

   AFRICAN EXODUS.––A considerable number of passengers on the Underground Railroad, started from this city en route for Chicago, or some other Abolition region, on Sunday night. We understand that among the lot were six belonging to R.J. Gray, three to P. Chouteau, three to Emmanuel Block, and one to Mr. Merritt, of the firm of Warne & Merritt, and one belonging to Captain Smith, making fourteen in all that are heard from, and the supposition is that there are several others in the gang. The authorities of our city cannot be too particular in watching and punishing the emissaries of Abolitionism, both black and white, that are known to be in our midst. 

Article

   STAMPEDE AMONG THE AFRICANS.––On Sunday night last some fifteen or twenty slaves departed this city for the colder climates of the north. It is generally supposed that they absconded under the advice and control of the very efficient underground railroad agents, who seem to hold place and profit in this city. 

Article

   Negro Stampede.––We learn from a private source that some half dozen negroes, belonging to Gen. Boggs, and others of Pendleton county, made tracks on Saturday night last, for a home north of Mason and Dixon's line. It is greatly to be hoped that they will speedily be secured, as, apart from the loss sustained, success only leads to other absconding. The fugitives stole horses to help them on the way.––Hardy (Va.) Whig, Oct. 6th. 

Article

    Another stampede in the slave population of Bourbon took place on Saturday night. About 15 slaves decamped. One was captured at Fairview, and two seen in the vicinity of Mayslick, on Tuesday evening. Great excitement among the Khoys, who turned out in hot pursuit of the fugitives. 

Article

   ––Texas negroes, of late, are in the habit of running off to Mexico in droves––tempted thither by wandering tribes of women, wandering about like gypsies. So it is said. The slaveholders, however, are organizing, to prevent a continuance of the stampede. 

Article

   Another stampede in the slave population of Bourbon took place on Saturday night last.––About fifteen slaves decamped. One was captured at Fairview, and two seen in the vicinity of Mayslick, on Tuesday evening. 

Article

   STAMPEDE AMONG THE AFRICANS.––On Sunday night last some fifteen or twenty slaves departed this city for the colder climates of the north. It is generally supposed that they absconded under the advice and control of the very efficient underground railroad agents, who seem to hold place and profit in this city. 

Article

   THE FUGITIVE SLAVES.––The company of fifteen or twenty slaves that escaped our city a week or two ago have thus far eluded all pursuit. From one of the officers who has been in pursuit of them, we learn that the party were traced from this city across the river to Illinoistown, and that there they were shipped on board a Keokuk boat in boxes marked as goods. Arriving at Keokuk they proceeded across the country to Wisconsin and are now very probably safe in Canada. 

   This shows that they have been most skillfully conducted. Doubtless the plan had been under deliberation for a long time, the negroes acting by the advice and control of the numerous underground railroad agents that infest our city. 

Article

                              From the Boston Post.

   OUTRAGE IN WORCESTER.--A miserable crowd, composed mostly of negroes, assaulted officer Butman, of Boston, in Worcester, on Sunday, and bruised and injured him severely. A placard posted about the city--

   "Look out for Kidnappers! Butman, the Kidnapper of Thomas Sims and Anthony Burns, is in town, accompanied by another officer! They are booked at the American Temperance House! Look out for them"--disturbed the usual Sunday quiet of the city, and attracted a gathering of people who were further excited by the harangues of some abolitionists. The crowd surrounded the Temperance Hotel, and but for the interference of the authorities of the city he would have been assaulted. He was arrested, finally, for carrying concealed weapons, and giving bail was allowed to depart. The following telegraphic despatch was published on Monday: 

Article

   Stampede Among the Africans.–The St. Louis Democrat says that on the night of Sunday, the 22d Oct., some fifteen or twenty slaves departed from that city in a body, for the colder climate of the North, it is supposed by the remarkably efficient underground railroad agents who reside in or about that city. Heavy rewards were offered by their owners for their recapture, and it was thought that without very skillful management by their pilots, they would be retaken.

Article

   STAMPEDE AMONG THE AFRICANS.––On Sunday night last, some 15 or 20 slaves departed this city for the colder climates on the north. It is generally supposed that they absconded under the advice and control of the very efficient underground railroad agents who seem to hold place and profit in our city.––St. Louis Dem. 

Article

   Texas negroes, of late, are in the habit of running off to Mexico in droves––tempted thither by tribes of women wandering about like gypsies. So it is said. The slaveholders, however, are organizing to prevent a continuance of the stampede.

Article

   GREAT EXCITEMENT IN WORCESTER.--ARREST OF A BOSTON OFFICER.--A telegraphic despatch received from Worcester yesterday morning informs us that Asa O. Butman, one of the Boston United States Marshal's officers, who was somewhat conspicuous in the arrests of the fugitives, Thomas Sims and Anthony Burns, was found booked at the American House on Sunday, and was posted throughout the city in the evening in placards holding the most violent language.

   A committee of the citizens went to the hotel and watched Butman's movements. He there flourished a pistol, and threatened to use it, whereupon a warrant was issued,and he was immediately arrested. He was brought up before the police court this morning, charged with carrying concealed weapons. His case was postponed two weeks, and he was required to give bonds to appear. 

Article

    Stampede among the Africans..––The St. Louis Democrat says that on the night of Sunday, the 22d Oct., some fifteen or twenty slaves departed from that city in a body, for the colder climates of the North, under the guidance, it is supposed, of the remarkably efficient underground railroad agents who reside in or about that city. 

Article

   A stampede in the slave population of Bourbon county, Ky., occurred on the night of the 21st. ult. About fifteen slaves escaped. 

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   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Since last Sunday information has been given in our city, of the escape of some seventeen slaves from our State.

   A Mr. Berry, of this place, lost five, for whom offers a reward of $1000. Mrs. Smith, of this city, lost three, and Marin Wash two.

   Four have absconded from St. Charles, and three from Saint Genevieve. 

   No traces have as yet been discovered of the fugitives. They are evidently under the hands of the most skillful guides. 

Article

    Stampede of Slaves.––We learn that during Sunday evening, eight negroes, five men and three women, belonging to James Hatfield, of Bourbon county, Ky., made their escape, and it is thought that they crossed the Ohio river, a few miles below this city, from the fact that two skiffs fastened on the Kentucky side were found the following morning, drifted a short distance down the river on the Ohio side. Mr. H. was in the city on Tuesday, and left again in the evening in pursuit of the fugitives, who, he was informed, had passed through this city, and were en route for Canada.––Cincinnati Gazette.

Article

   Stampede of Slaves    We learn that during Sunday evening, eight negroes, five men and three women, belonging to James Hatfield of Bourbon county, Ky., made their escape, and it is thought that they crossed the Ohio River a few miles below this city, from the fact that two skiffs fastened on the Kentucky side, were found the following morning drifted a short distance down the river on the Ohio side. Mr. Hatfield was in the city on Tuesday and left again in the evening in pursuit of the fugitives, who, he was informed, had passed through this city on Monday, and were en route for Canada.–Cincinnati Gazette. 

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   NEWS FROM THE FUGITIVE SLAVES.––The following would seem to indicate somewhat of the whereabouts of the negroes who have lately escaped our State in such numbers. We clip it from the Chicago Tribune of the 5th inst:

   PASSENGERS BY THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD.––Last evening seventeen passengers arrived in our city by the underground railroad, and were immediately forwarded to "the land of the free," where they doubtless have arrived before this notice is generally read by the people of this city. 

   The U.G.R.R. is doing a larger business, at this time than ever before. We hear that it averages over twenty-five weekly, and they all go through safely. Nebraska Bill helps them very much, and his charges stand to the account of Senator Douglas. 

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     WHAT IS TO BE DONE NOW!

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     SLAVE HUNT IN CHICAGO.

Great Excitement––Military Called Out. 

   The Underground Rail Road, which has a terminus in this city, has been doing a large business fo ra few months past. The business being large, great dividends are reported, as will appear from the proceedings of last week. 

Article

     Over Jordan.

   We find the following in the Detroit Advertiser of the 11th:

UNDERGROUND EXPRESS TRAIN.––The express train over the Underground arrived this morning, at an early hour, bringing fourteen of the "chattels" that the man-stealers attempted to arrest in Chicago. The four who are reported by telegraph as having been smuggled off, arrived on Saturday, having been smuggled in the right direction––so that the whole seventeen are standing to-day on soil guarded by the flaming cross of St. George. 

   The total number of fugitives that have crossed the river at this point since the 6th of May last, is four hundred and eighty-two.

Article

   THE ST. LOUIS PAPERS are very much exercised over the frequent stampede of slaves, and their almost impossible recovery after they once get as far as Chicago––which is pronounced one of "the most pestilent abolition holes in the country." The Republican recommends an increased police; but the Intelligencer says that the People will not bear that––as they cannot afford to pay any higher tax than they now do, to protect Slave property, and that the owners will not submit to a special tax for this purpose––as that would be so severe as to break down the Slave Institution in Missouri. Under these circumstances, the Intelligencer says there is no other course to maintain slavery in Missouri, but the revival of the African slave trade. It is conceded by all that the repeal of the Missouri Compromise, is the inciting cause of the extreme difficulty of recovering slaves in Illinois.

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   A REMEDY PROPOSED FOR NEGRO STAMPEDES

Some of the St. Louis papers are discussing the subject of negro stampedes, with the view of arriving at some plan that will put an effectual stopper upon like occurrences in the future. The Republican proposes such an enlargement of the police force as will accomplish the object. The Intelligencer thinks this plan impracticable, because the people would not submit to the increased taxation which it involves but submits a project of its own, which it doubts not will effect the object. We quote from the last named paper:

   The evil has got to be an immense one, and it is daily becoming more aggravated in its character. It threatens to subvert the institution of slavery in this State entirely, and unless effectually checked, it will certainly do so. 

Article

   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Since last Sunday, information has been given in our city, of the escape of some seventeen slaves from our State. A Mr. Berry, of this place, lost five, for whom he offers a reward of $1,000. Mrs. Smith, of this city, lost three, and Martin Wash two. Four have absconded from St. Charles, and three from Saint Genevieve. No traces have as yet been discovered of the fugitives. They are evidently under the hands of the most skilful guides.––St. Louis Democrat, Nov. 30.