View All Documents // 1840s // 1850s // 1860s

Displaying 351 - 400 of 1029

Article

   Negro Stampede.––We learn from a private source that some half dozen negroes, belonging to Gen. Boggs, and others of Pendleton county, made tracks on Saturday night last, for a home north of Mason and Dixon's line. It is greatly to be hoped that they will speedily be secured, as, apart from the loss sustained, success only leads to other absconding. The fugitives stole horses to help them on the way.––Hardy (Va.) Whig, Oct. 6th. 

Article

   ––Texas negroes, of late, are in the habit of running off to Mexico in droves––tempted thither by wandering tribes of women, wandering about like gypsies. So it is said. The slaveholders, however, are organizing, to prevent a continuance of the stampede. 

Article

   Another stampede in the slave population of Bourbon took place on Saturday night last.––About fifteen slaves decamped. One was captured at Fairview, and two seen in the vicinity of Mayslick, on Tuesday evening. 

Article

    Another stampede in the slave population of Bourbon took place on Saturday night. About 15 slaves decamped. One was captured at Fairview, and two seen in the vicinity of Mayslick, on Tuesday evening. Great excitement among the Khoys, who turned out in hot pursuit of the fugitives. 

Article

   STAMPEDE AMONG THE AFRICANS.––On Sunday night last some fifteen or twenty slaves departed this city for the colder climates of the north. It is generally supposed that they absconded under the advice and control of the very efficient underground railroad agents, who seem to hold place and profit in this city. 

Article

   THE FUGITIVE SLAVES.––The company of fifteen or twenty slaves that escaped our city a week or two ago have thus far eluded all pursuit. From one of the officers who has been in pursuit of them, we learn that the party were traced from this city across the river to Illinoistown, and that there they were shipped on board a Keokuk boat in boxes marked as goods. Arriving at Keokuk they proceeded across the country to Wisconsin and are now very probably safe in Canada. 

   This shows that they have been most skillfully conducted. Doubtless the plan had been under deliberation for a long time, the negroes acting by the advice and control of the numerous underground railroad agents that infest our city. 

Article

                              From the Boston Post.

   OUTRAGE IN WORCESTER.--A miserable crowd, composed mostly of negroes, assaulted officer Butman, of Boston, in Worcester, on Sunday, and bruised and injured him severely. A placard posted about the city--

   "Look out for Kidnappers! Butman, the Kidnapper of Thomas Sims and Anthony Burns, is in town, accompanied by another officer! They are booked at the American Temperance House! Look out for them"--disturbed the usual Sunday quiet of the city, and attracted a gathering of people who were further excited by the harangues of some abolitionists. The crowd surrounded the Temperance Hotel, and but for the interference of the authorities of the city he would have been assaulted. He was arrested, finally, for carrying concealed weapons, and giving bail was allowed to depart. The following telegraphic despatch was published on Monday: 

Article

   Stampede Among the Africans.–The St. Louis Democrat says that on the night of Sunday, the 22d Oct., some fifteen or twenty slaves departed from that city in a body, for the colder climate of the North, it is supposed by the remarkably efficient underground railroad agents who reside in or about that city. Heavy rewards were offered by their owners for their recapture, and it was thought that without very skillful management by their pilots, they would be retaken.

Article

   STAMPEDE AMONG THE AFRICANS.––On Sunday night last, some 15 or 20 slaves departed this city for the colder climates on the north. It is generally supposed that they absconded under the advice and control of the very efficient underground railroad agents who seem to hold place and profit in our city.––St. Louis Dem. 

Article

   Texas negroes, of late, are in the habit of running off to Mexico in droves––tempted thither by tribes of women wandering about like gypsies. So it is said. The slaveholders, however, are organizing to prevent a continuance of the stampede.

Article

   GREAT EXCITEMENT IN WORCESTER.--ARREST OF A BOSTON OFFICER.--A telegraphic despatch received from Worcester yesterday morning informs us that Asa O. Butman, one of the Boston United States Marshal's officers, who was somewhat conspicuous in the arrests of the fugitives, Thomas Sims and Anthony Burns, was found booked at the American House on Sunday, and was posted throughout the city in the evening in placards holding the most violent language.

   A committee of the citizens went to the hotel and watched Butman's movements. He there flourished a pistol, and threatened to use it, whereupon a warrant was issued,and he was immediately arrested. He was brought up before the police court this morning, charged with carrying concealed weapons. His case was postponed two weeks, and he was required to give bonds to appear. 

Article

    Stampede among the Africans..––The St. Louis Democrat says that on the night of Sunday, the 22d Oct., some fifteen or twenty slaves departed from that city in a body, for the colder climates of the North, under the guidance, it is supposed, of the remarkably efficient underground railroad agents who reside in or about that city. 

Article

   A stampede in the slave population of Bourbon county, Ky., occurred on the night of the 21st. ult. About fifteen slaves escaped. 

Article

   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Since last Sunday information has been given in our city, of the escape of some seventeen slaves from our State.

   A Mr. Berry, of this place, lost five, for whom offers a reward of $1000. Mrs. Smith, of this city, lost three, and Marin Wash two.

   Four have absconded from St. Charles, and three from Saint Genevieve. 

   No traces have as yet been discovered of the fugitives. They are evidently under the hands of the most skillful guides. 

Article

    Stampede of Slaves.––We learn that during Sunday evening, eight negroes, five men and three women, belonging to James Hatfield, of Bourbon county, Ky., made their escape, and it is thought that they crossed the Ohio river, a few miles below this city, from the fact that two skiffs fastened on the Kentucky side were found the following morning, drifted a short distance down the river on the Ohio side. Mr. H. was in the city on Tuesday, and left again in the evening in pursuit of the fugitives, who, he was informed, had passed through this city, and were en route for Canada.––Cincinnati Gazette.

Article

   Stampede of Slaves    We learn that during Sunday evening, eight negroes, five men and three women, belonging to James Hatfield of Bourbon county, Ky., made their escape, and it is thought that they crossed the Ohio River a few miles below this city, from the fact that two skiffs fastened on the Kentucky side, were found the following morning drifted a short distance down the river on the Ohio side. Mr. Hatfield was in the city on Tuesday and left again in the evening in pursuit of the fugitives, who, he was informed, had passed through this city on Monday, and were en route for Canada.–Cincinnati Gazette. 

Article

   NEWS FROM THE FUGITIVE SLAVES.––The following would seem to indicate somewhat of the whereabouts of the negroes who have lately escaped our State in such numbers. We clip it from the Chicago Tribune of the 5th inst:

   PASSENGERS BY THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD.––Last evening seventeen passengers arrived in our city by the underground railroad, and were immediately forwarded to "the land of the free," where they doubtless have arrived before this notice is generally read by the people of this city. 

   The U.G.R.R. is doing a larger business, at this time than ever before. We hear that it averages over twenty-five weekly, and they all go through safely. Nebraska Bill helps them very much, and his charges stand to the account of Senator Douglas. 

Article

     WHAT IS TO BE DONE NOW!

Article

     SLAVE HUNT IN CHICAGO.

Great Excitement––Military Called Out. 

   The Underground Rail Road, which has a terminus in this city, has been doing a large business fo ra few months past. The business being large, great dividends are reported, as will appear from the proceedings of last week. 

Article

     Over Jordan.

   We find the following in the Detroit Advertiser of the 11th:

UNDERGROUND EXPRESS TRAIN.––The express train over the Underground arrived this morning, at an early hour, bringing fourteen of the "chattels" that the man-stealers attempted to arrest in Chicago. The four who are reported by telegraph as having been smuggled off, arrived on Saturday, having been smuggled in the right direction––so that the whole seventeen are standing to-day on soil guarded by the flaming cross of St. George. 

   The total number of fugitives that have crossed the river at this point since the 6th of May last, is four hundred and eighty-two.

Article

   THE ST. LOUIS PAPERS are very much exercised over the frequent stampede of slaves, and their almost impossible recovery after they once get as far as Chicago––which is pronounced one of "the most pestilent abolition holes in the country." The Republican recommends an increased police; but the Intelligencer says that the People will not bear that––as they cannot afford to pay any higher tax than they now do, to protect Slave property, and that the owners will not submit to a special tax for this purpose––as that would be so severe as to break down the Slave Institution in Missouri. Under these circumstances, the Intelligencer says there is no other course to maintain slavery in Missouri, but the revival of the African slave trade. It is conceded by all that the repeal of the Missouri Compromise, is the inciting cause of the extreme difficulty of recovering slaves in Illinois.

Article

   A REMEDY PROPOSED FOR NEGRO STAMPEDES

Some of the St. Louis papers are discussing the subject of negro stampedes, with the view of arriving at some plan that will put an effectual stopper upon like occurrences in the future. The Republican proposes such an enlargement of the police force as will accomplish the object. The Intelligencer thinks this plan impracticable, because the people would not submit to the increased taxation which it involves but submits a project of its own, which it doubts not will effect the object. We quote from the last named paper:

   The evil has got to be an immense one, and it is daily becoming more aggravated in its character. It threatens to subvert the institution of slavery in this State entirely, and unless effectually checked, it will certainly do so. 

Article

   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Since last Sunday, information has been given in our city, of the escape of some seventeen slaves from our State. A Mr. Berry, of this place, lost five, for whom he offers a reward of $1,000. Mrs. Smith, of this city, lost three, and Martin Wash two. Four have absconded from St. Charles, and three from Saint Genevieve. No traces have as yet been discovered of the fugitives. They are evidently under the hands of the most skilful guides.––St. Louis Democrat, Nov. 30. 

Article

   HEAVY ROBBERY.––Stampede of Slaves.––On Saturday night a serious stampede of slaves occurred in this city. Five likely and valuable slaves made for parts unknown, one of them taking $1,500 of his master's money with him. One negro belonged to Mr. Geo. E. Sadler, one to Mr. R.H. Dickinson, one to Jones & Slater, and two others. The one belonging to Messrs. Jones & Slater enjoyed their fullest confidence. For a long time he had been taking deposits in bank for them.––Richmond (Va.) Post. 

Article

   A serious stampede of slaves took place from Richmond, Va., on Saturday night. Five likely and valuable slaves made off to parts unknown, one of them taking $1,500 of his master' money with him. The Richmond Dispatch says it is very evident from the number of slaves that have escaped within a short time past, that they have the assistance of abolition emissaries. The slaves of course cannot be supposed to run away from happiness "of their own motion." They are probably victims of misplaced confidence in the truth of a celebrated "rhetorical flourish."

Article

   Last Saturday night a stampede of slaves occurred in Richmond. Five likely and valuable slaves made off to parts unknown, one of them taking $1,500 of his master's money with him. The Richmond Dispatch says it is very evident from the number of slaves that have escaped within a short time past, that they have the assistance of abolition emissaries. 

Article

   On Saturday week a serious stampede of slaves occurred in Richmond, Va. Five likely and valuable slaves made off for parts unknown, one of them taking $1500 of his master's money with him. One negro belonged to Mr. George F. Sadler, one to Mr. R.H. Dickinson, one to Jones & Slater, and two others. The one belonging to Messrs. Jones & Slater enjoyed their fullest confidence. For a long time he had been making their deposits in the bank for them. 

Article

  On Saturday night a serious stampede of slaves occurred in Richmond. Five likely and valuable slaves made off to parts unknown, one of them taking with him $1,500 of his master's money.––The Richmond Dispatch says it is very evident, from the number of slaves that have escaped within a short time past, that they have the assistance of abolition emissaries. 

Article

  On Saturday night a serious stampede of slaves occurred in Richmond. Five likely and valuable slaves made off to parts unknown, one of them taking $1506 of his master's money with him. 

Article

   On Saturday night, a serious stampede of slaves occurred in Richmond, Va. Five likely and valuable slaves made off to parts unknown, one of them taking 1,500 of his master's money with him. The Richmond Dispatch says it is very evident, from the number of slaves that have escaped within a short time past, that they have the assistance of abolition emissaries. 

Article

  RUNAWAY NEGROES.––Members of the police report that six negroes––a man, woman and four children––belonging to Col. O'Fallon, ran away from his place above the city on Sunday night last. They are supposed to be on the way to Chicago. 

Article

   RUNAWAY NEGROES.––The agents of the Underground Railroad are unusually active this week. Besides six negroes belonging to Col. O'Fallon, three others were run off day before yesterday––one belonging to a gentleman in the city, and the others belonging to Mr. Coleman, who lives a few miles out on the Bonhomme road. 

Article

   Stampeding Slaves.–But one of the five slaves who left their owners of this city, about three weeks since, has been captured. On Tuesday, we learn through the Post, two more suddenly left–one of them having said to some of the children in his master's house that he had 'made it all right with a man, and was going to leave soon.'–Richmond Enquirer.

Article

    Life in Texas.

  Mr. G.W. Kendall, editor of the N.O. Picayune, who has retired to a sheep farm, in Texas, thus writes to this paper:

   "So far, although my place at the Post Oak Spring is within a few miles of where depredations have been committed, the Indians have been kind enough not to molest me; yet all my good fortune I attribute to the fat that at that particular locality I keep neither horses nor cattle, and I do not believe that the red rascals care much about sheep. I hope they may never get up an appetite for mutton. 

Article

TEXAS DANGERS.––Kendall of the Picayune writing from his ranche near San Antonio about the Indians, says:

   "But if they have not meddled with my sheep they have pestered me in another way; they have kept up a stampede among the men in my employ, and rendered some of them constantly uneasy.– One negro man in particular, who was at work cutting and splitting rails, was in such continual fear for several days that he declared he could not half work. To use his own words: 'Ebery lick I gib de tree wid de axe I hab to look round to see if some Injun don't gib me a lick in de back ob my head wid a tomahawk.' A man with such a scare upon him is of little service."

Article

       Slaves Captured

Article

                KANSAS.

   Amid the smoke and roar of the Kansas cannonade we fear that the Northern emigrant who is looking in that direction may find himself blinded and confused. Let us lift the curtain of fog and expose the real state of the case so far as it concerns him personally.

Article

                      For Frederick Douglass' Paper. 

THE FEARFUL ODDS AGAINST THE SLAVE

  [We heartily welcome (as our readers will) to our column the letter from our intelligent and right-hearted Correspondent––"A New York Merchant"––and we will thank him for further favors in the same direction–ED.]

Article

   STAMPEDE.––On Sunday night some eight or ten slaves managed to cross the river into Illinois, but the authorities being on the alert, five of them were arrested and brought back. The others made good their escape. Thursday evening Judah Burrows, Mrs. Meachum and Isaac Breckenridge, three free negroes, were arrested on charge of assisting the runaways.––St. Louis Dem. 23d inst. 

Article

          Negro Stealing.

   Some more effective means than those furnished by law, must be adopted to secure slaveholders against the depredations which have been secretly carried on here from some time past, and now have become so flagrant as to attract very general attention, and demand very stringent preventives. Our facilities of inter-communication with Chicago, which is known to be a den of abolitionists and negro thieves, has doubtless emboldened and encouraged the philanthropists to make descents upon our kitchens and carry off our cooks; for it is notorious that a fugitive slave once safely housed in that place cannot be reclaimed except by resort to force, and that hundreds have, therefore, fled to Chicago sure of protection and sympathy. 

Article

   Five runaway negroes were caught near Alton, Illinois, in charge of underground railroad agents last week, and taken back to St. Louis. The slaves in that region are making a regular stampede. 

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––A party of nine slaves undertook to leave St. Louis one night last week, under the guidance of the abolitionists. Five of them were captured, and the rest succeeded in getting off. It is to be regretted that their decoyers were not captured. 

Article

  STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––We copy the following from the Cincinnati Enquirer of Saturday:

Article

         Stampede of Slaves. 

We copy the following from the Cin. Enq. of Saturday:

Article

   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The negroes had been worked and paid no wages for many years on the plantation of Mr. Byrnes, of Bourbon County. They had been observed on several evenings to mysteriously absent themselves from their owner's premises, and on Wednesday night they were watched by a son of Mr. Byrnes, who saw them in a secluded spot, about half a mile from the house, in conversation with a couple of white men, with whom they were talking for upwards of an hour. Informing his father of this occurrence, the latter became alarmed, and despatched the son to a friend who resided ten miles from his plantation, for assistance; the negroes, in the meantime, suspecting something, stole off, and were followed by Mr. Byrnes, who, observing that they had bundles with them, attempted to prevent their leaving. This they resisted, and their master, in the melee, was severely handled, being left senseless on the sward.

Article

   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE AT NORFOLK.––On Saturday night last, says the Norfolk Herald, a party of five negroes undeterred by the recent failure of some other negroes in Norfolk to escape, disappeared. Strong suspicions were entertained that they were on board a Northern schooner which it was supposed, was detained in Hampton Roads by bad weather. Accordingly a strong party of citizens accompanied by two policemen, took boats and started after the vessel, but had not returned at a late hour Monday night. Two of the slaves belonged to Mr. T. Bottimore, one to L. Stosser, one to Messrs. Herman & Co., and one to Dr. Behan. 

   Last week, two slaves escaped from Mr. Seth March, who has gone to the North, to try and reclaim them. 

Article

   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The negroes had been worked and paid no wages for many years on the plantation of Mr. Byrnes, of Bourbon county. They had been observed on several evenings to mysteriously absent themselves from their owner's premises, and on Wednesday night they were watched by a son of Mr. Byrnes, who saw them in a secluded spot, about half a mile from the house, in conversation with a couple of white men, with whom they were talking for upward of an hour. Informing his father of this occurrence, the latter became alarmed, and dispatched the son to a friend who resided ten miles from his plantation, for assistance; the negroes, in the meantime, suspecting something, stole off, and were followed by Mr. Byrnes, who, observing that they had bundles with them, attempted to prevent their leaving. This they resisted, and their master, in the melee, was severely handled, being left senseless on the sward.

Article

STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The negroes had been worked and paid no wages for many years on the plantation of Mr. Byrnes, of Bourbon county. They had been observed on several evenings to mysteriously absent themselves from their owner's premises, and on Wednesday night they were watched by a son of Mr. Byrnes, who saw them in a secluded spot, about half a mile from the house, in conversation with a couple of white men, with whom they were talking for upward of an hour. Informing his father of this occurrence the latter became alarmed and dispatched the son to a friend, who resided ten miles from his plantation, for assistance; the negroes, meantime, suspecting something, stole off and were followed by Mr. Byrnes who, observing that they had bundles with them attempted to prevent their leaving. This they resisted and their master in the melee was severely handled, being left unconscious on the sward.

Article

   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The negroes had been worked and paid no wages for many years on the plantation of Mr. Byrnes, of Bourbon county. They had been observed on several evenings to mysteriously absent themselves from their owner's premises, and on Wednesday night they were watched by a son of Mr. Byrnes, who saw them in a secluded spot, about half a mile from the house, in conversation with a couple of white men, with whom they were talking for upward of an hour. Informing his father of this occurrence, the latter became alarmed, and dispatched the son to a friend who resided ten miles from his plantation, for assistance; the negroes, in the meantime, suspecting something, stole off, and were followed by Mr. Byrnes, who, observing that they had bundles with them, attempted to prevent their leaving. This they resisted, and their master, in the melee, was severely handled, being left senseless on the sward.

Article

   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE AT NORFOLK.––Saturday night lsat, says the Norfolk Herald, a party of five negroes, undeterred by the recent failure of some other negroes in Norfolk to escape, disappeared. Strong suspicions were entertained that they were on board a Northern schooner, which it was supposed was detained in Hampton Roads by bad weather. Accordingly a strong party of citizens, accompanied by two policemen, took boats and started after the vessel, but had not returned at a late hour Monday night. Two of the slaves belonged to Mr. T. Bottimore, one to L. Stosser, one to Messrs. Herman & Co., and one to Dr. Behan. 

   Last week, two slaves escaped from Mr. Seth March, who has gone to the North to try and reclaim them.––Richmond Dispatch.