Our database contains over 1,000 newspaper articles that specifically label a group escape as a "slave stampede" or some related variant, such as "negro stampede." Our document records also include hundreds of other types of primary sources and newspaper articles related to these stampedes but that do not contain the word itself. The map below provides a sample visualization of the newspaper coverage between 1856 and 1860 with clickable access to the various records inside our database. The detailed listing underneath includes records for all of the documents from the period 1847 to 1865, containing both transcripts and original images.

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Article

       From the Washington Aurora. 

A stampede.-- The people of this district being excluded from all participation in the common property of the U. States, by a recent Act of Congress, have wisely determined to compell all free colord persons to emigrate to their brethren of the North. We understand 700 have lately left here for New York, Philadelphia, and Boston, and about 800 more are making preparations to remove, as soon as the ensuing Legislature adjourns, unless they succeed in their petition to that body to be recognized as State property, receiving support and protection in consideration of their services on the public works. 

Article

    A Tempest in a Tea-Pot.

      A NEW PROPHET!

    The Passage of the Fugitive Slave Bill, and the prompt and successful manner in which it has been carried into execution, seem to have stirred up Runawayniggerdom, to its lowest depths. The "fugitives" are holding numerous indignation meetings at the North, and denouncing the law as an infraction of their rights? Many of them are making a stampede for Canada, while others seem determined to resist the law, hoping to receive the aid of their free soil sympathizers. 

Article

                 From the American Whig Review. 

    Our political friends will find in the present number an article illustrating the further policy of Great Britain, as developed by the conduct of her agents in Central America. 

    In another article we have given a general view of her commercial policy, explaining, in very simple language, and by popular illustrations, some things supposed to be peculiarly dark and difficult. 

    Our developments of British arrogance and assumption have excited a violent jealousy in the minds of some persons, as we discover by the vituperations of a certain, or rather uncertain, portion of the public press. We can only say that we shall suffer no opportunity to escape us of laying correct information before our readers, not only the public proceedings, but of public insults and contempts politicly cast upon us by the present British Ministry, miscalled "Whig," and their agents, employed or volunteer. 

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                                     A Stampede. 

   On Saturday last, three citizens of Kentucky made an effort to arrest as a fugitive a colored man named Hubbard Cable, who for some time past, has been teamster for Mr. Martin Ryan, of this place. They made careful inquiry, before they proceeded on their mission, as to the feelings of our people and received the assurance that no opposition would be made to any legal course they might take. The leader of the three, was Mr. Wm. Read, the other two were named William McMillen and Ferdinand Kirkham. 

Article

The Fugitive Slave Bill.

The New York Herald, after its own peculiar way, presents the following true history of the passage and fate of the Fugitive Law. Its effects upon Northern politics and politicians are not at all exaggerated. 

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A Stampede.-- Between one hundred and fifty and two hundred negro slaves, belonging to Indians of the Seminole and Creek Nations, have eloped from their masters and are on their way to Mexico, and will no doubt endeavor to follow the route taken by Wild Cat, the Seminole chief, last summer, who conducted about 60 runaway slaves from this nation across the Rio Grande, somewhere near Presido de Rio Grande. Fifty dollars per head is offered as a reward for their arrest. 

Article

                             From the True Democrat. 

   Canada West--Colored People--their Situation. 

  Messrs. Editors:––The undersigned was appointed an agent by the friends of the "Fugitive Slaves" in Randolph, Marlboro'. Ravetma, and Wyndham, to visit and report the wants of the fugitives in Canada West, and to administer to them such aid as was committed to his care, by the friends of the slave in the above named places. 

   There are in Canada West probably not far from 3,000 fugitives. It is impossible to arrive at the exact number, as they are daily arriving, many of them having been hurried away from the Free (?) States, where they had accumulated some property; have sold their possessions at a great sacrifice, and are in need at present. 

Article

ANOTHER FUGITIVE SLAVE CASE. 

The Arrest of a Fugitive Slave--His Forcible Rescue by a Black Mob--The Law Trampled Under Foot. 

   Our city was again thrown into something of a commotion, on Saturday last, by the arrest of a fugitive slave named Shadrach, who has acted for several months in the capacity of a waiter in the Cornhill Coffee House. He is said to belong to Mr. John de Bree, of Norfolk, Va., from whom he escaped on the 3d of May, 1850. 

   The arrest was made by Deputy Marshal Riley, who officiated for Marshal Devens, who is now at Washington. Mr. Riley, in company with the informer and officer Warren, proceeded to the Coffee House about 11 o'clock, where they called for refreshments, which were served by the slave. On his appearance he was arrested and forthwith taken into custody. 

Article

   The Fugitive Slave Case in Boston.

   An extraordinary amount of latent patriotism, it appears to us, has been liberated by this simple case. We are awaiting with some impatience to hear from the South on the subject; and, in the mean time, congratulate that respectable but somewhat excitable section of the confederacy on "something having turned up," at last, which will diver their indignation, for a time at least, from the misdeeds of poor little Vermont! Theoretical "nullification in Vermont," they will think, is not so bad as practical nullification in Massachusetts. 

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      A Chapter from the History of an Administration. 

             From the Washington Republic. 

Article

   Stampedes of slaves, from Mason and Nicholas counties, Ky. seem of common occurrence. 

Article

                 Profit and Loss.

   Here is an account of the flight of more slaves in one week, from two counties in Kentucky, than have been recovered under the Fugitive slave law in all the Northern States in eight months. 

   NEGRO STAMPEDE.--The Maysville Post Boy of the 2d inst., says:

   During the past week, a leave-taking fever has prevailed among the slaves in this section. On Sunday night, a woman and three children the property of F.M. Wheedon of our city, left their owners in Lewis.–eight belonging to Mrs. Eliza Sheppard, two to Chas. Wood, and the remainder, owners names not ascertained. From Nicholas several have also departed from freedom during the past few days. 

Article

                      A Slave Case.

                 Mays Lick, Ky., Wednesday, May 7, 1851. 

To the Editor of the Tribune:

Article

   Negro Stampede.––The Maysville (Ky.) Post Boy, of the 21st April, gives an account of twenty-two negroes, belonging to different persons in that section, who ran off to a free State during the week. 

Article

   NEGRO STAMPEDE--The Maysville (Ky.) Post Boy of the 2nd inst. says:

   "During the last week a leave-taking fever has prevailed among the slaves in this section. On Sunday night a woman and three children, the property of F.M. Wheeden of our city, left. On Wednesday night, nineteen in one gang left their owners in Lewis; eight belonging to Mrs. Eliza Shepperd, two to Charles Wood, and the remainder, owners names not ascertained. From Nicholas, several have also departed for freedom during the past few days."

Article

    AN ATTEMPT TO KIDNAP DEFEATED. 

   A colored man, named Moses Johnson , was arrested on the third instant, in Chicago, as a fugitive slave, and brought before Commissioner Meecker. Mr. Peck appeared on behalf of the claimant, a person residing in Missouri; Messrs. Manene and Larned appeared for the defendant. The case produced great excitement throughout the city, and was under trial for two days.

At 2 o’clock, on the 6th, the Commissioner delivered his opinion, occupying more than an hour, and decided the following material points:

Article

    Stampede Frustrated.––Several slaves in the neighborhood of Lagrange, Texas, recently made arrangements to run away and proposed to Mexico. They were to have left on a Monday, but one of them, in order to have an early start, made tracks on Sunday. He was pursued, and when taken confessed the whole plan. He stated that the negroes were all supplied with guns and ammunition, and were prepared to force their way. 

Article

   A number of negroes in the vicinity of Lagrange, lately had their preparations completed for a trip to Mexico. They were provided with guns, ammunition, etc., to force their way through any opposition which they might encounter. Fortunately they were detected in time to have their contemplated stampede effectually arrested. 

Article

   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The papers of the Eastern Shore record the sudden disappearance of a number of slaves. Three men, belonging to Mr. Wm. H. De Courcey, of Wye Neck, Queen Anne's county, ran off on the night of the 14th inst; he offers $500 for their arrest. Three servants belonging, one to Mr. John W. Battie, one to Mr. John Harris, and the other to Mr. Spedden Orem, of Talbot county, disappeared on Saturday night last, taking with them two horses belonging to Morris O. Colston, esq., and one to Mr. Battie. Mr. Colston pursued, but succeeded only in recovering the horses. 

Article

   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The papers of the Eastern Shore record the sudden disappearance of a number of slaves. Three men, belonging to Mr. Wm. H. De Courcey, of Wye Neck, Queen Anne's county, ran off on the night of the 14th inst; he offers $500 for their arrest. Three servants belonging, one to Mr. John W. Battle, one to Mr. John Harris, and the other to Mr. Spedden Orem, of Talbot county, disappeared on Saturday night last, taking with them two horses belonging to Morris G. Colston, esq., and one to Mr. Battle. Mr. Colston pursued, but succeeded only in recovering the horses.––Balt. Clipper. 

Article

   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.--The papers of the eastern shore record the sudden disappearance of a number of slaves. Three men belonging to Mr. Wm. H. DeCourcey, of Wye Neck, Queen Anne's County, ran off on the night of the 14th inst.; he offers $500 for their arrest. Three servants, belonging, one to Mr. John W. Battie, one to Mr. John Harris, and the other to Mr. Spedden Orem, of Talbot County, disappeared on Saturday night last, taking with them two horses belonging to Morris G. Colston, and one to Mr. Battie. Mr. Colston pursued, but succeeded only in recovering the horses.--Baltimore Clipper. 

Article

   "The North American is so hard up for ammunition that it has been compelled to resort to a repetition of the slanders of the Harrisburg American, to eke out its sorry slanders against BIGLER; and in doing this, is forced to endorse a publication of the alleged private conversation of Hon. Geo. W. Woodward, at Harrisburg!"–Pennsylvanian.

Article

Slave Stampede.-- Some ninety slaves are said to have run away from Kanawha county, a few days ago. 

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE STORY EXPLODED. – We see, by the Kanawha Republican, that the only foundation for the alleged stampede of ninety negroes from Kanawha was the removal of about that number of slaves from Kanawha, under the care of their masters, to New Orleans.

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––We see by the Kanowha [Kanawah] (Va.) Republican that the only foundation for the alleged stampede of ninety negroes from Kanawha, was the removal of about that number of slaves from Kanawha, under the care of their masters, to New Orleans. 

Article

   It is stated that the only foundation for the alleged stampede of ninety negroes from Kanawha, was the removal of about that number of slaves from Kanawha, under the care of their masters, to New Orleans. 

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Some ninety slaves are said to have run away form Kanawha county, Va., in one herd, a few days since. 

Article

   Forcible Jail Delivery.-–There was a stampede from the Lauderdale county, Miss., jail, on the night of the 27th ult. All the prisoners made their escape, and had not been retaken at the last accounts, viz: B. Thompson, sentenced to ten years in the penitentiary for negro stealing; Thomas Boyd, sentenced to two months for assault and battery, and three runaway slaves. 

Article

   Highly Interesting from Rochester.

STAMPEDE AMONG FUGITIVE SLAVES––ENTHUSIASTIC RECEPTION OF LOLA MONTES––CANAL ENLARGEMENT MEETING, ETC.

                                                              Rochester, May 13, 1852.

   Warrants have been issued to-day for the arrest of several fugitive slaves in this city. Three slaves are known to have been in the city yesterday; but they are believed to have taken a sudden departure by the underground railroad, and there is little prospect of any arrest of either of the parties for whom warrants have been issued. 

   Lola Montes appeared here, to-night, before a crowded and highly respectable audience. She was enthusiastically applauded. She has got a strong abolition influenced to contend against her; but will, a sin the matter of the Jesuits, overcome it. 

Article

   A STAMPEDE AT WATERTOWN.––During the sittings of the Anti-Slavery Convention in this city, Deputy Marshal Fitch had occasion to take the cars on the East for private business. A lynx-eyed Abolitionist of this town was on his trail and by a  species of clairvoyance peculiar to that sect discovered that he had a warrant in his pocket for the arrest of a Fugitive Slave in Watertown, and that he had with the utmost caution and secrecy taken the cars for that place armed to the teeth with revolves and determination to execute the Fugitive Slave Law. Those who were present in Corinthian Hall that morning will long remember the appearance of a little band of "earnest men" at the eastern door whose every look, and word, and action, betrayed the depth of their purpose and the sublimity of their mission. Brief and significant inquires were made in regard to the whereabouts of Abolitionists in Jefferson County, and then they vanished as hurridly as they came.

Article

   A regular stampede took place among the slaves of Mr. J. Mattingly, near St. Louis, on the night of the 13th inst. Seven of them made their escape. 

Article

     "Uncle Tom's Cabin as it is."

   This long promised publication, which seems to have had as many ante-natal difficulties to encounter as "Poor Yerrick" had, is, at length, born and swaddled; and Buffalo, this Queen City of the Lakes, has the high honor, or the humiliating affliction, whichever it may be considered by the reader, or being the place of its nativity and the residence of its parent. 

Article

  The Slave Stampede.––A number of persons have gone in pursuit of the fourteen male and female slaves of Mrs. Pendletown, of this county, who ran off on Satruday night to Pennsylvania. They were, at the time, hired out in different sections of the county. Mrs. P. has offered a reward of $1,400 for their recovery. 

Article

   THERE was an extensive slave stampede in Pendleton Co., Va., on the night of the 28th ult

Article

   A SLAVE STAMPEDE.--It is said there was a regular stampede on the night of the 28th ult., among the slaves of Pendleton county, Va.–– Among those who left were three belonging to Z. Dyer, Esq., late Clerk of the county; two were owned by Cyrus Hopkins, Esq., and one by Elijah Stonestreet. About a year since, A.W. Dyer, Esq., of the same county, lost four valuable slaves in the same way. 

Article

   A Slave Stampede.--It is said there was a regular stampede on the night of the 28th ult., among the slaves of Pendleton county, Va. Among those who left were three belonging to Z. Dyer, Esq., late Clerk of the county; two were owned by Cyrus Hopkins, Esq., and one by Elijah Stonestreet. About a year since, A.W. Dyer, Esq., of the same county, lost four valuable slaves in the same way. 

Article

   A SLAVE STAMPEDE.––We understand that fourteen negroes, male and female, belonging to Mrs. Pendleton, of Hagerstown, and hired out at different places in the country, ran away on Saturday night last, to Pennsylvania. A reward of four hundred dollars is offered for their apprehension, and a number of persons who did not "loathe" the Fugitive Slave Law, are in hot pursuit of them. 

   P.S.––These Slaves were captured at Harrisburg and confined in the jail at that place. 

Article

THE NEGROES LEAVING.-- We learn from the Rockingham, Va. Register, that on the 4th inst., there was a considerable stampede among the negroes of Pendleton county, in that State, Z. Dyer, Esq., late Clerk of the County, lost three; Cyrus Hopkins, Esq., two; and Elijah Stonestreet, one.-- About a year since, A.W. Dyer, of the same county, lost four of his mot valuable slaves in the same way. 

Article

   THE NEGROES LEAVING.  We learn from the Rockingham, Va., Register, that on last Wednesday night, two weeks, there was a considerable stampede among the negroes of Pendleton county in that State. Z. Dyer, Esq., late clerk of the county, lost three; Cyrus Hopkins, Esq., two; and Elijah Stonestreet, one. About a year since, A.W. Dyer, of the same county, lost four of his most valuable slaves in the same way.

Article

   STAMPEDE.––Sometime Tuesday night, seven negro men, the property of the Messrs. Arterburn, in this city, broke out of their "quarters," and ran off. We suppose they are "pre-lying," or lying out in some of the cornfields in the county. Several of them had heavy "bracelets" on.

Article

A SLAVE STAMPEDE.-- We understand that fourteen negroes, males and females, belonging to Mr. Pendleton, of Hagerstown, and hired out at different places in the country, ran away, to Pennsylvania a few weeks ago. A reward of four hundred dollars was offered for their apprehension, and they were subsequently captured near Harrisburg. 

Article

   STAMPEDE –– There was a stampede among the negroes in Washington county, Md., week before last, and one person, a lady, lost fourteen on the occasion. It is said they went through Harrisburg last Sunday a week. The negroes have not been taken. 

Article

   STAMPEDE.––On Tuesday night, the 24th ult., seven slaves belonging to the Messrs. Arterburn, of Louisville, broke out of their quarters and ran off. It was supposed that they were lying out in some of the cornfields in the country. 

Article

   We copy the following from the Maysville Eagle of Thursday evening, the 9th inst:

   NEGRO STAMPEDE.––On Tuesday night last eight slaves, (five men, a woman, and two children) belonging to sundry cities of Mason county, made their escape, and have not yet been recovered. There is ground of suspicion that a portion, if not all of the fugitives, fled in concert, and they were aided by white confederates in crossing the river. The outrages thus inflicted on the owners, loudly demanded redress; and the slaveholders of this region ought to devise for themselves some practical and efficient remedy. The proposition made at a public meeting in this city two or three months ago, for an association of slaveholders, has not, so far as we have heard, been acted on, by any considerable number of them. 

Article

SIXTEEN HUNDRED DOLLARS REWARD!

     RUNAWAY from the subscribers on the night of the 4th inst., the following slaves: Bernard, a bright mulatto boy, tall and good looking; speaks French and English, aged about twenty-six years, and belongs to Lewis V. Bogy, of Ste. Genevieve. 

    Henry, also a bright mulatto, rather small, but very active; speaks French and English, aged about eighteen years, and belongs also to Lewis V. Bogy. 

   Joseph, a red mulatto, tall and slender, speaks French and English, aged from twenty-six to twenty-eight years, belongs to Antoine Janis, of Ste. Genevieve. 

   Theodore, a mulatto, short and stumpy, with a downcast look, speaks French and English, aged about twenty-three to twenty-five years, belongs to Neree Valle of St. Genevieve. 

   Edmund, a black man stout and well built, with a defect in one eye; aged about thirty-seven to forty years, and belongs to William Skewes of Ste. Genevieve. 

Article

NEGRO STAMPEDE--LARGE REWARD.--Attention is directed to the advertisement in another column, offering a large reward for the apprehension of runaway negroes.

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   STAMPEDE.––There was a stampede among the negro slaves in Washington Co., Md., week before last, and a Mrs. Pendleton lost fourteen on the occasion. The negroes have not been taken. 

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––We notice in the St. Louis papers that nine slaves recently ran-away from their masters, in and near St. Genevieve, Missouri, on the night of the 4th of September. The slaves have been traced across the river, into Illinois, and it is believed they were accompanied by whites, who directed their flight to the neighborhood of Sparta, Randolph county, where a very strong anti-slavery feeling exists. Persons have proceeded to that locality, to secure the fugitives if possible. The probability is, that they will not be successful. The slaves were young men, ranging from 20 to 30 years of age. A reward of twelve hundred dollars is offered for their arrest. 

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Eight slaves escaped from St. Genevieve, Mo., and that vicinity one night last week. They are in Illinois, and officers are in pursuit. 

Article

   Negro Stampede.––The Marysville (Ky.) Eagle says that on the night of the 7th inst. eight slaves belonging to sundry citizens of Mason county, Ky., made their escape across the Ohio river. It was thought that they fled in concert, and were aided by white confederates. The Eagle calls upon the slaveholders to form an association for self-defence.