Our database contains over 1,000 newspaper articles that specifically label a group escape as a "slave stampede" or some related variant, such as "negro stampede." Our document records also include hundreds of other types of primary sources and newspaper articles related to these stampedes but that do not contain the word itself. The map below provides a sample visualization of the newspaper coverage between 1856 and 1860 with clickable access to the various records inside our database. The detailed listing underneath includes records for all of the documents from the period 1847 to 1865, containing both transcripts and original images.

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Article

   On the night of the 28th of August there was a regular stampede among the slaves of Pendleton county, Va. It is said that several dozens of most valuable slaves made their exit on this occasion from the county; and that no hope of their recovery is entertained, as it is believed that they had it cut and dried to go to Canada without delay. 

Article

   NEGRO STAMPEDE.––On Tuesday night last, (five men, a woman, and two children) belonging to sundry citizens of Mason county, Kentucky, made their escape, and have not yet been recovered.––There is strong ground of suspicion that a portion, if not all of the fugitives, fled in concert, and that they were aided by white confederates in crossing the river. Tee [The] Maysville Eagle calls for an association of Slave holders for the protection of their property. 

Article

   ARREST OF THE OTHER STE. GENEVIEVE FUGITIVE SLAVES.––The St. Louis papers state that late on Monday afternoon, Mr. E.B. Way, a resident of Illinois, about fifteen miles east of Alton, discovered a gang of five negroes in his woods as he was passing by. Supposing them to be the Ste. Genevieve fugitives, he induced them to go to his house under the belief that he would assist them to escape. They accompanied him and partook of a supper, which was ordered by Mr. Way to be prepared for them, whilst he left the house under a pretext of getting the wagon ready to carry them further on––but in reality to get the assistance of a neighbor, Mr. W.A. Scott, to assist in making them prisoners. Previous to his leaving, Mr. Way secured their guns, which were brought by the negroes to the house, so that with the assistance of Mr. Scott––they being well armed––the whole were arrested without difficulty, and secured.

Article

   FUGITIVE SLAVE.––Three of the nine runaway slaves from St. Genevieve, Mo., were captured last week in the vicinity of this city. They were taken to St. Louis last Saturday. A reward of $1600 was offered for the capture of the whole gang. We have not heard what proportion will be awarded for this partial capture.

Article

Negro Stampede. -- On Tuesday night last, eight slaves, (five men, a woman, and two children,) belonging to sundry citizens of Mason county, (Ky.) made their escape, and have not been recovered.-- There is strong ground of suspicion that a portion, if not all of the fugitives, fled in concert, and that they were aided by white confederates in crossing the river. The outrages thus inflicted on the owners, loudly demand redress; and the slaveholders of this region ought to devise for themselves some practical and efficient remedy.--Marysville Eagle

Article

There was a stampede among the negro slaves in Washington Co., Md., week before last, and a Mrs. Pendleton lost fourteen on the occasion. The negroes have not been taken.––[Mil. Free Democrat.

Article

                Great Slave Stampede.

   ESCAPE OF THIRTY-ONE NEGROES––TROUBLE ANTICIPATED BETWEEN THE OWNERS AND FREE BLACKS AT RIPLEY, OHIO, ETC.

                    MAYSVILLE, KY., Sept. 27, 1852.

   Thirty-one slaves, from the neighborhood of Augusta, and Dover, Ky., escaped to Ohio last night. They were traced to Ripley on the river, and were pursued by their owners and others from this side. The clothes taken by the slaves were found concealed in a yard, and the owners were refused a warrant to search the house in which it was supposed most of the slaves were hid. Five who had continued on were pursued by their masters, and three captured. They are expected to be brought over tonight. 

Article

   ESCAPE OF SLAVES.––On Saturday night week seven slaves escaped from Wood county, Va., to parts unknown. Six of these slaves belonged to Wm. Spencer, Esq., and one to the estate of Geo. W. Kincheloe, dec'd. Stampedes have been very frequent this season in that vicinity. 

Article

            Stampede of Slaves.

   MAYSVILLE, September 29.––Thirty-one slaves a day or two ago ran away from here to Ripley, Ohio, and have not yet been arrested. Trouble is apprehended unless the authorities surrender them. 

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Eight slaves escaped from St. Genevieve, Mo., and that vicinity last week. They are in Illinois, and officers are in pursuit. 

Article

             A Stampede of Slaves.

   MAYSVILLE, KY., Sept. 29––Thirty-one slaves escaped from this place a day or two ago, to Ripley, Ohio, where they concealed themselves, and had not been arrested at the latest accounts. The Kentuckyans are on the [illegible] as trouble is anticipated, if they are not given up immediately by the authorities. 

         [SECOND DISPATCH.]

   MAYSVILLE, Sept. 29––The clothes taken by the slaves were found concealed in a yard and the owners were refused a warrant to search the house in which it was supposed most of the slaves were hid. Five who had continued on were pursued by their masters and were captured. They are expected to be brought over tonight. 

   The negroes of Ripley gathered in numbers, armed with guns, and surrounded the hotel where the Kentuckyans stopped. Fears are entertained of a serious disturbance, as the Kentuckyans remain there on the watch, and are determined to recover the slaves. 

Article

                              GREAT SLAVE STAMPEDE. 

MAYSVILLE, KY., Sept. 27.--Thirty one slaves from the neighborhood of Augusta and Dover, Ky., escaped to Ohio last night. They were traced to Ripley on the river, and were pursued by their owners and others from this side.-- The clothes taken by the slaves were found concealed in a yard, and the owners were refused a warrant to search the house in which it was supposed most of the slaves were hid. Five who had continued on were pursued by their masters, and three captured. They are expected to be brought over to-night. 

   The negroes of Ripley assisted in numbers, armed with guns, and surrounded the hotel where the Kentuckians stopped. Fears are entertained of a serious disturbance, as the Kentuckians remain there on the watch, and are determined to recover the slaves. 

   Much indignation is felt here because the authorities of Ripley refused to assist the masters in granting warrants. 

Article

               From the Carolina Spartan.

       INSUBORDINATION OF NEGROES.

Article

   ANOTHER NEGRO STAMPEDE.––On Saturday or Sunday night last, some thirty-two salves, the property of citizens of Mason and Bracken counties, made their escape across the Ohio river. Three of them captured some thirty-five miles back of Ripley, have since returned; but owing to the facilities for flight afforded in Ohio, the probability is that the residue will make good their escape. It is beyond question that fugitive slaves are afforded protection, means and facilities, by people of Ohio, regardless of the obligations and duties devolved on them by the Constitution and Laws of the United States. 

   Now, our readers well know that we are not in the habit of allowing any sort of exciting or inflammatory matter to enter these columns. We have been disposed to forbear much, in order to quiet agitation and to give evidence to the North that the South in good faith acquiesce in the Compromise measures.

Article

MOVEMENT AMONG THE NEGRO SLAVES IN AMERICA

Article

             WASHINGTON.

  Mr. Baring's Visit––A Dinner at Mr. Corcoran's in his Honor––Progress of the Campaign––Flight of Slaves.

           Correspondence of the New-York Daily Times.

              WASHINGTON, Thursday, Sept. 30, 1852. 

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Thirty-one slaves from the neighborhood of Augusta and Dover, Ky. escaped to Ohio on Saturday night of last week. They were traced to Ripley on the river, and were pursued by their owners and others from this side. The clothes taken by the slaves were found concealed in a yard, and the owners were refused a warrant to search the house in which it was supposed most of the slaves were hid. Five who had continued on were pursued by their masters, and three captured. 

  The conduct of the public authorities of Ripley, Ohio was said to be very reprehensible.––Great indication in consequence pervades the entire community from whence the slaves escaped. 

Article

             GREAT SLAVE STAMPEDE.

   The telegraph (says the Richmond Times) brings intelligence of the scale of thirty-one slaves, from the neighborhood of Augusta and Dover, Kentucky, on the night of the 26th ult., They crossed the Ohio river at Augusta, and succeeded in reaching the town of Ripley, in Ohio, unmolested. As soon as their absence became generally known, a party of Kentuckians, consisting mainly of owners of the negroes, started in pursuit. No difficulty was experienced in tracing the fugitives to Ripley, at which place a large amount of clothing, taken by the same runaways, was found concealed in a yard. 

Article

   Another Stampede.

   Thirty-one slaves escaped from the neighborhood of Augusta, Ky., over the river, into Ohio, one night last week. The slaveholders followed but were mightily troubled to get warrants. The colored people of Ripley, Ohio, resisted them handsomely. The most of them will, doubtless, get clear. 

Article

                     For the National Era. 

          C.M. CLAY AND GEO. W. JULIAN. 

   I have just witnessed one of the most interesting spectacles which a citizen of our Republic can now be called to look upon––a bridging over of the Ohio––a wiping out of Mason and Dixon's line––partial destruction of the prejudice between North and South

   I have seen, perhaps for the first time in the history of our country, the Northern politician or statesman cross on to Southern soil, and their discourse to public audiences, freely, fully, and faithfully, upon the social, moral, and political evils of American Slavery. 

   Our friend Geo. W. Julian, of Indiana, the nominee for the Vice Presidency of the Free Democracy, has, in company with C.M. Clay, addressed public audiences in Lewis, Mason, and Bracken counties. The audiences in Lewis and Bracken were not large, but very attentive, and the impression good. 

Article

               [For the True Democrat.]

                    The Stampede.

               Ripley, Brown Co., O., Oct. 4, 1852. 

Article

                     Slave Stampede.

   Thirty-one slaves, from the neighborhood of Augusta and Dover, Ky., escaped to Ohio on Saturday night of last week. They were traced to Ripley, on the river, and were pursued by their owners and others this side. The clothes taken by the slaves were found concealed in a yard, and the owners were refused a warrant to search the house in which it was supposed most of the slaves were hid. Five who had continued on were pursued by their masters, and three captured. 

   The conduct of the public authorities of Ripley, Ohio, was said to be very reprehensible. Great indignation in consequence pervades the entire community from whence the slaves escaped. 

Article

  Great Slave Stampede––Maysville Ky Sep 5––

Thirty-one slaves from the neighborhood of Augusta and Dover Ky., escaped to Ohio last night. They were traced to Ripley on the river, and were pursued by their owners and others from this side. The clothes taken by the slaves were found concealed in a yard and the owners were refused a warrant to search the house which it was supposed most of the slaves were hid. Five who had continued on were pursued by their masters and three captured. They are expected to be brought over to-night. 

   The negroes of Ripley assisted in numbers armed with guns, surrounded the hotel where the Kentuckians stopped. Fears are entertained of a serious disturbance, as the Kentuckians remain there on watch, and are determined to recover the slaves.

   Much indignation is felt here because the authorities of Ripley refused to assist the masters in granting warrants. 

Article

                      NEGRO STAMPEDES.

   We see from our exchanges that several negro stampedes have recently taken place in different parts of the State. The negroes are running away in scores, assisted and urged on, doubtless, by northern abolitionists. Those lawless fanatics are bringing things to a fine condition, truly. If they continue their negro-stealing and negro-harboring business at the present rate, and their orators are permitted to canvass Kentucky and preach their incendiary doctrines to our slaves, the result will ere long be terrible. The people of Kentucky will not quietly submit to such robberies. 

             K. Yeoman. 

Article

               HOW BREAKS THE DAY!

   There is no mistake, friends, the free of freedom form a perfect cordon of enthusiasm around the Baltimore military. Every day brings the cheering tidings of fugitives from despotism of eloquent speaking and enthusiastic gatherings, where all had been pronounced sealed and delivered to Scott Pierce. 

   We had expected great changes; we believed that conviction was fastening on the hearts of men, and that the leaders of the Baltimore stampede for slavery, would be the victims of their own policy–the more odious in proportion to their prominence. We believed that disappointment awaited all who conspired to sustain oppression, prevent free discussion, and make wrong a finality; but, friends, the work speeds more gloriously even than we had dared to hope. 

Article

                                                         BALTIMORE, Oct. 21.

   Preparations are making to welcome Gen. Scott who is expected this P.M.

   Mr. Jas. McPherson, a well known and much esteemed merchant of this city, died to-day. 

   A stampede of 16 slaves occurred at Washington on Saturday last. 

Article

  Great Stampede of Fugitive Slaves––Attempted Rescue and Escape––Much Excitement.

                  SANDUSKY, Ohio, Oct. 21.

   Intense excitement prevails here in consequence of the escape of a number of fugitive slaves, who arrived here last evening.  

   The slaves were from Kentucky, and on their reaching this city, they were escorted by their friends and a number of citizens to the steamer Arrow. Immediately before her departure an attempt was made to arrest them, but failed, owing to the interference of citizens of both colors. After a sharp struggle the slaves succeeded in escaping to Canada. 

   Those who were in pursuit of the slaves consider that the citizens are wholly responsible for this failure to execute the laws. 

Article

                             The News.

Article

       Another Stampede of Slaves.--Fifteen negroes belonging to Elias Cheney, Esq., of Funkstown, and one to Alexander Mitchell, Esq., living near Hagerstown, ranaway to Pennsylvania on Friday night last. A reward of one thousand dollars has been offered for their apprehension. 

Article

   A BLACK STAMPEDE.––On Wednesday night of last week ten slaves from an interior county of Kentucky crossed the river below this city, and succeeded in making their escape through Hamilton county on their way to Canada. There were six men and four women. Their owners, who arrived one day too late, appeared to be gentlemanly and honorable men, and stated that the slaves had been well treated, not-overworked and having no cause of complaint except a rumor that two of their number, who were husbands, were to be sold to a Louisiana cotton planted. 

   They were rendered every assistance while in this city to enable them to recover their property.––Cin. Gaz. 

Article

                            SANDUSKY. (Ohio.) Oct. 21st. 

      Great Stampede of Fugitive Slaves–Attempted Rescue and Escape–Much Excitement.–The most intense excitement prevails here in consequence of the escape of a number of fugitive slaves who arrived here last evening. 

   The slaves were from Kentucky, and on their reaching the city, they were escorted by their friends and a number of citizens to the steamer Arrow; immediately on the departure of which vessel, an attempt was made to arrest them, but failed, owing to the interference of citizens of both colors, who prevented the slave-catchers from taking the slaves ashore. 

   After a sharp struggle, the slaves succeeded in escaping to Canada. 

   The slave-catchers consider that the citizens are wholly responsible for this failure to execute the laws. 

Article

A stampede of sixteen slaves occurred in Washington county, Va., on Saturday of last week. 

Article

              Runaway Negroes.

   Quite an excitement sprung up at Sandusky, Ohio, on the 21st inst., in consequence of the capture and subsequent rescue of a party of fugitive slaves from Kentucky. White and black scamps participated in the rescue, and immediately started the runaways Canada. The owners, it is probable, will sue the city for the loss of their property. Another slave stampede occurred in Washington county, Maryland, last Saturday. No less than sixteen eloped. Like their Kentucky brethren, they are very likely in Canada by this time. 

Article

   NEGRO STAMPEDE––A number of Slaves, escaped on horses from Bourbon county on Sunday last. It is supposed that about 25 fled.––Some of them were recovered in the neighborhood of the Blue Licks, but more of them are still fugitives.––Maysville Eagle, 2d. 

Article

                  Runaway Negroes. 

   Quite an excitement sprung up at Sandusky, Ohio, on the 21st ult., in consequence of the capture and subsequent rescue of a party of fugitive slaves from Kentucky. White and black scamps participated in the rescue, and immediately started the runaways for Canada. The owners, it is probable [probably], will sue the city for the loss of their property. Another slave stampede occurred in Washington county, Maryland, last Saturday. No less than sixteen eloped. Like their Kentucky brethren, they are very likely in Canada by this time. 

Article

                      ESCAPE. 

   We find the following in the Cincinnati Gazette of Oct. 24th:

   "A BLACK STAMPEDE.–On Wednesday night of last week ten slaves from an interior county of Kentucky, crossed the river below this city and succeeded in making their escape through Hamilton county on their way to Canada. There were six men and four women. Their owners, who arrived one day too late, appeared to be gentlemanly and honorable men, and stated that the slaves had been well-treated, not overworked, and having no cause of complaint except a rumor that two of the number, who were husbands, were to be sold to a Louisiana cotton planter." 

Article

   Quite an excitement had sprung up in Sandusky, Ohio, in consequence of the capture and subsequent rescue of a party of fugitive slaves from Kentucky. White and black citizens participated in the rescue, and immediately started the runaways for Canada. The owners, it is probable, will sue the city for the loss of their property, Another slave stampede occurred in Washington county, Maryland, on the 24th. No less than 15 eloped. 

Article

   BLACK-BALLING––On Monday evening, about 8 o'clock, officer Trueheart was informed that a subscription ball, gotten up by the negroes, was about to come off at the Washington Hotel. He immediately gave information to the Mayor of the convening of this unlawful assembly, and the Mayor issued a warrant for the arrest of all the negroes engaged in it. A posse of watchmen under the lead of Lieutenants Trueheart and Wilkinson then proceeded to the Hotel, and found over a hundred negroes sitting about in the cellar, basement and dining room. A supper had been prepared for the company, and dancing was about to commence. Upon the entrance of the officers, there was, of course, a tremendous stampede of the negro aristocracy; nevertheless, ninety out of the party were secured, adorned in full ball-room dress. There were 47 men and 43 women, ebony sprigs of youth and beauty.

Article

   ANOTHER NEGRO STAMPEDE.––A number of slaves escaped on horses from Bourbon county, Ky., on Sunday last. It is supposed that about twenty-five fled. Some of them were recovered in the neighborhood of the Blue Licks, but more of them are still fugitives.––A number of Kentucky officials were in the city yesterday in search of a squad of four who are suspected of crossing the river opposite Fulton.––Cin. Gaz. 

Article

   A regular stampede occurred among the slaves in the vicinity of Augustus and Dover, Ky., on Monday, the 2nd ult.––Thirty-one crossed the river into Ohio, and at last accounts the larger portion of them were supposed to be stowed away among the inhabitants of Ripley. 

Article

              Stampedes.

   Scarcely a day passes, on which we do not hear it stated, that there has been a stampede–a flight of slaves from the prison-house of Southern bondage. The "Voice of the Fugitive," a Canadian paper, informs us too, that never before were the escapes to Canada, from our soil, so numerous as they have been this fall. These stampedes, from their inception to the issue of them, are the most heroic events in American history; and yet they are made the greatest of American political crimes. They are dictated by man's natural love of freedom; and are approved by the purest and holiest principles of religion and right; and yet, they are held to be offences of the deepest dye, by the slavebreeders and slavedealers who make the laws, and control the principles of this nation. 

Article

ESCAPE. We find the following in the Cincinnati Gazette of Oct. 24th:

            “A BLACK STAMPEDE. On Wednesday night of last week ten slaves from an interior county of Kentucky, crossed the river below this city and succeeded in making their escape through Hamilton county on their way to Canada. There were six men and four women. Their owners who arrived one day too late, appeared to be gentlemanly and honorable men and stated that the slaves had been well-treated, not over worked, and having no cause of complaint except a rumor that two of the number, who were husbands, were to be sold to a Louisiana cotton planter.”

Article

SLAVE STAMPEDE.— The Maysville (Ky.) Eagle says: We noticed the escape of thirty odd slaves from Mason and Bracken Counties, a short time ago. Some of them were captured in Ohio, by their owners at a distance of 40 miles from the river. We are requested by a gentleman of this county, who joined in the pursuit and aided in capturing three of the fugitives, one of whom belonged to himself, to state, on behalf of the pursuers, as an act of justice to the people of Ohio, the pursuing party were not obstructed or ill-treated in any way, by word or deed, though their business was perfectly known, but they experienced from the people of Ohio, both going and returning every aid they desired, many citizens of that State volunteering their personal assistance and extending the kindest hospitality. They brought the captured slaves home without encountering the least obstacles, or even an unkind word.

Article

   ANOTHER NEGRO STAMPEDE. A number of slaves escaped on horses from Bourbon county, Kentucky, on Sunday last. It is supposed that about twenty five fled. Some of them were recovered in the neighborhood of the Blue Licks, but more of them are still fugitives. A number of Kentucky officials were in the city yesterday in search of a squad of four, who are suspected of crossing the river opposite Fulton. 

                           Cincinnati Gazette. 

Article

   Fugitive Slave Case in one Chapter. 

   We take the following account the last Xenia Torchlight. 

Article

   A FUGITIVE SLAVE STORY IN ONE CHAPTER.– We take the following account from the last Xenia Torchlight

Article

                        A chase after Fugitives. 

Article

   A Stampede of Slaves took place from our city on Saturday night last––eight of them belonged to J.G. Lynn, Esq., and one to Joseph Dilley, Esq. They were pursued and overtaken about twenty-four miles from this place, in Bedford county, Pa., and those belonging to Mr. Lynn were brought back. Five of them have their feet so badly frozen as to be unable to walk. 

Article

   A stampede of slaves, says the Cumberland, Md., Telegraph, took place from our city on the 15th inst.; eight of them belonged to J.G. Lynn, Esq., and one to Joseph Dilley, Esq. They were pursued and overtaken about twenty-four miles from this place, in Bedford county, Pa., and those belonging to Mr. Lynn were brought back. Five of them have their feet so badly frozen as to be unable to walk.