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                             The News.

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       Another Stampede of Slaves.--Fifteen negroes belonging to Elias Cheney, Esq., of Funkstown, and one to Alexander Mitchell, Esq., living near Hagerstown, ranaway to Pennsylvania on Friday night last. A reward of one thousand dollars has been offered for their apprehension. 

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   A BLACK STAMPEDE.––On Wednesday night of last week ten slaves from an interior county of Kentucky crossed the river below this city, and succeeded in making their escape through Hamilton county on their way to Canada. There were six men and four women. Their owners, who arrived one day too late, appeared to be gentlemanly and honorable men, and stated that the slaves had been well treated, not-overworked and having no cause of complaint except a rumor that two of their number, who were husbands, were to be sold to a Louisiana cotton planted. 

   They were rendered every assistance while in this city to enable them to recover their property.––Cin. Gaz. 

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                            SANDUSKY. (Ohio.) Oct. 21st. 

      Great Stampede of Fugitive Slaves–Attempted Rescue and Escape–Much Excitement.–The most intense excitement prevails here in consequence of the escape of a number of fugitive slaves who arrived here last evening. 

   The slaves were from Kentucky, and on their reaching the city, they were escorted by their friends and a number of citizens to the steamer Arrow; immediately on the departure of which vessel, an attempt was made to arrest them, but failed, owing to the interference of citizens of both colors, who prevented the slave-catchers from taking the slaves ashore. 

   After a sharp struggle, the slaves succeeded in escaping to Canada. 

   The slave-catchers consider that the citizens are wholly responsible for this failure to execute the laws. 

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A stampede of sixteen slaves occurred in Washington county, Va., on Saturday of last week. 

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              Runaway Negroes.

   Quite an excitement sprung up at Sandusky, Ohio, on the 21st inst., in consequence of the capture and subsequent rescue of a party of fugitive slaves from Kentucky. White and black scamps participated in the rescue, and immediately started the runaways Canada. The owners, it is probable, will sue the city for the loss of their property. Another slave stampede occurred in Washington county, Maryland, last Saturday. No less than sixteen eloped. Like their Kentucky brethren, they are very likely in Canada by this time. 

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   NEGRO STAMPEDE––A number of Slaves, escaped on horses from Bourbon county on Sunday last. It is supposed that about 25 fled.––Some of them were recovered in the neighborhood of the Blue Licks, but more of them are still fugitives.––Maysville Eagle, 2d. 

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                      ESCAPE. 

   We find the following in the Cincinnati Gazette of Oct. 24th:

   "A BLACK STAMPEDE.–On Wednesday night of last week ten slaves from an interior county of Kentucky, crossed the river below this city and succeeded in making their escape through Hamilton county on their way to Canada. There were six men and four women. Their owners, who arrived one day too late, appeared to be gentlemanly and honorable men, and stated that the slaves had been well-treated, not overworked, and having no cause of complaint except a rumor that two of the number, who were husbands, were to be sold to a Louisiana cotton planter." 

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                  Runaway Negroes. 

   Quite an excitement sprung up at Sandusky, Ohio, on the 21st ult., in consequence of the capture and subsequent rescue of a party of fugitive slaves from Kentucky. White and black scamps participated in the rescue, and immediately started the runaways for Canada. The owners, it is probable [probably], will sue the city for the loss of their property. Another slave stampede occurred in Washington county, Maryland, last Saturday. No less than sixteen eloped. Like their Kentucky brethren, they are very likely in Canada by this time. 

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   Quite an excitement had sprung up in Sandusky, Ohio, in consequence of the capture and subsequent rescue of a party of fugitive slaves from Kentucky. White and black citizens participated in the rescue, and immediately started the runaways for Canada. The owners, it is probable, will sue the city for the loss of their property, Another slave stampede occurred in Washington county, Maryland, on the 24th. No less than 15 eloped. 

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   BLACK-BALLING––On Monday evening, about 8 o'clock, officer Trueheart was informed that a subscription ball, gotten up by the negroes, was about to come off at the Washington Hotel. He immediately gave information to the Mayor of the convening of this unlawful assembly, and the Mayor issued a warrant for the arrest of all the negroes engaged in it. A posse of watchmen under the lead of Lieutenants Trueheart and Wilkinson then proceeded to the Hotel, and found over a hundred negroes sitting about in the cellar, basement and dining room. A supper had been prepared for the company, and dancing was about to commence. Upon the entrance of the officers, there was, of course, a tremendous stampede of the negro aristocracy; nevertheless, ninety out of the party were secured, adorned in full ball-room dress. There were 47 men and 43 women, ebony sprigs of youth and beauty.

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   ANOTHER NEGRO STAMPEDE.––A number of slaves escaped on horses from Bourbon county, Ky., on Sunday last. It is supposed that about twenty-five fled. Some of them were recovered in the neighborhood of the Blue Licks, but more of them are still fugitives.––A number of Kentucky officials were in the city yesterday in search of a squad of four who are suspected of crossing the river opposite Fulton.––Cin. Gaz. 

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   A regular stampede occurred among the slaves in the vicinity of Augustus and Dover, Ky., on Monday, the 2nd ult.––Thirty-one crossed the river into Ohio, and at last accounts the larger portion of them were supposed to be stowed away among the inhabitants of Ripley. 

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              Stampedes.

   Scarcely a day passes, on which we do not hear it stated, that there has been a stampede–a flight of slaves from the prison-house of Southern bondage. The "Voice of the Fugitive," a Canadian paper, informs us too, that never before were the escapes to Canada, from our soil, so numerous as they have been this fall. These stampedes, from their inception to the issue of them, are the most heroic events in American history; and yet they are made the greatest of American political crimes. They are dictated by man's natural love of freedom; and are approved by the purest and holiest principles of religion and right; and yet, they are held to be offences of the deepest dye, by the slavebreeders and slavedealers who make the laws, and control the principles of this nation. 

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ESCAPE. We find the following in the Cincinnati Gazette of Oct. 24th:

            “A BLACK STAMPEDE. On Wednesday night of last week ten slaves from an interior county of Kentucky, crossed the river below this city and succeeded in making their escape through Hamilton county on their way to Canada. There were six men and four women. Their owners who arrived one day too late, appeared to be gentlemanly and honorable men and stated that the slaves had been well-treated, not over worked, and having no cause of complaint except a rumor that two of the number, who were husbands, were to be sold to a Louisiana cotton planter.”

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SLAVE STAMPEDE.— The Maysville (Ky.) Eagle says: We noticed the escape of thirty odd slaves from Mason and Bracken Counties, a short time ago. Some of them were captured in Ohio, by their owners at a distance of 40 miles from the river. We are requested by a gentleman of this county, who joined in the pursuit and aided in capturing three of the fugitives, one of whom belonged to himself, to state, on behalf of the pursuers, as an act of justice to the people of Ohio, the pursuing party were not obstructed or ill-treated in any way, by word or deed, though their business was perfectly known, but they experienced from the people of Ohio, both going and returning every aid they desired, many citizens of that State volunteering their personal assistance and extending the kindest hospitality. They brought the captured slaves home without encountering the least obstacles, or even an unkind word.

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   ANOTHER NEGRO STAMPEDE. A number of slaves escaped on horses from Bourbon county, Kentucky, on Sunday last. It is supposed that about twenty five fled. Some of them were recovered in the neighborhood of the Blue Licks, but more of them are still fugitives. A number of Kentucky officials were in the city yesterday in search of a squad of four, who are suspected of crossing the river opposite Fulton. 

                           Cincinnati Gazette. 

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   Fugitive Slave Case in one Chapter. 

   We take the following account the last Xenia Torchlight. 

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   A FUGITIVE SLAVE STORY IN ONE CHAPTER.– We take the following account from the last Xenia Torchlight

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                        A chase after Fugitives. 

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   A Stampede of Slaves took place from our city on Saturday night last––eight of them belonged to J.G. Lynn, Esq., and one to Joseph Dilley, Esq. They were pursued and overtaken about twenty-four miles from this place, in Bedford county, Pa., and those belonging to Mr. Lynn were brought back. Five of them have their feet so badly frozen as to be unable to walk. 

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   A stampede of slaves, says the Cumberland, Md., Telegraph, took place from our city on the 15th inst.; eight of them belonged to J.G. Lynn, Esq., and one to Joseph Dilley, Esq. They were pursued and overtaken about twenty-four miles from this place, in Bedford county, Pa., and those belonging to Mr. Lynn were brought back. Five of them have their feet so badly frozen as to be unable to walk. 

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   NEGRO STAMPEDE.––The report is current here that Mr. Berry Hodge's overseer had eloped from that gentlemen's residence in Texas, carrying with him about twenty negroes. 

   At the last accounts Mr. Hodge, with a company of friends, were in hot pursuit. The negroes had got into Mexico.––Paducah (Ky) Jour.

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   A BLACK STAMPEDE –– On Wednesday night of last week, ten slaves from an interior county of Kentucky crossed the river below this city, and succeeded in making their escape through Hamilton Co., on their way to Canada. Their owners who arrived a day too late appeared to be gentlemanly and honorable men, and stated that the slaves had been well treated, not over worked, and having no cause of complaint except a rumor that two of their number, who were husbands, were to be sold to a Louisiana cotton planter.––Kentucky Gazette, 28th October.

   The editor of the Michigan Democrat makes the following comments on this circumstance:––"The only reason why they were induced to dare at all the hardships and perils of a race to Canada was, that the two who were husbands were about to be sold to Louisiana cotton planter! It is certainly marvellous that men should run away into freedom, and take their wives with them!"

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   FUGITIVE SLAVES.––The escape of negro slaves from these slave States adjacent to the free ones, seems regularly to augment, from year to year.––The following which has just met our eye, is the last case which has come to our knowledge:

   "NEGRO STAMPEDE.––25 negroes ran away from their masters in Boone county, Ky., on the night of the 2d inst. Among those who have lost their servants are two ministers of the gospel. The Aurora Banner says that some weeks before their departure, one of the slaves procured and read to his comrades "Uncle Tom's Cabin," and it is supposed that the beauties of Canadian freedom, as pictured by Mrs. Stowe, were the inducements to run away.

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A STAMPEDE. The "underground railroad" would seem to be in excellent order. A company of 29 slaves from Kentucky reached here on Monday evening last, and were safely conveyed to the Canada side the next morning. They were all hale young men and women, none of them over 35 years of age, for whose recapture we hear, liberal offers are proclaimed. They travelled by wagons through Indiana, and reached here in good condition. They preferred to be their own property, and they deserved to be.--Detroit Ch. Herald.

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            The Lagarange, Ga., Reporter advises slave-owners to be on the look-out for negro-stealers. The editor says numbers of slaves have been stolen from that vicinity, some of which have not as yet been recovered, and probably may never be.

            Three fugitive slaves passed through this place last week and were supplied with means to prosecute their journey to the Land of Freedom— the Fugitive Slave Law to the contrary notwithstanding. Now God makes the wrath of man to praise him! — Green-Mountain Freeman.

            Negro Stampede. – Twenty- five negroes ran away from their masters in Boone county, Ky. On the night of the 2d inst. Among those who have lost their servants are two ministers.

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   A Stampede. The "Underground Railroad" would seem to be in excellent order. A company of 29 slaves from Kentucky reached here on Monday evening last, and were safely conveyed to the Canada side next morning. They were all hale young men and women, none of them over 35 years of age, for whose recapture we hear liberal offers are proclaimed. They traveled by wagons through Indiana, and reached here in good condition. They preferred to be their own property, and they deserved to be. 

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   A STAMPEDE. –– The "Underground Railroad" would seem to be in excellent order. A company of twenty-nine slaves from Kentucky reached here on Monday evening last, and were safely conveyed to the Canada side next morning. They were all hale young men and women, none of them over 35 years of age, for whose re-capture, we hear, liberal offers are proclaimed. They travelled by wagons through Indiana, and reached here in good condition.––Detroit Christian Herald. 

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   FATAL AFFRAY.––On Sunday night last, two negro men, Adam an[d] Edmund, belonging to Mr. Hayden and Mrs. McClane, of this city, got into a quarrel, which ended in the former stabbing the latter several times with a knife. One of the wounds in his side is very large, and the doctor's opinion is that it will prove fatal. Adam was arrested by the Marshal, but he has since succeeded in making his escape.––[Cape Girardeau Eagle. 

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           THE BLOOD OF THE MARTYRS IS THE SEED OF THE CHURCH— On the very spot where the lamented Lovejoy poured out his blood, a victim to his Anti Slavery principles, stands the office of Alton Telegraph, which though hitherto of the Hunker stamp, now fearlessly and honestly remarks, in connection with a notice of the recent stampede of Slaves from Missouri.

            It would be a glorious thing for Missouri, if all her slaves should take into their hands to run away. If she only knew it, they are one of the greatest drawback to her advancement and prosperity.

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   Slave Stampedes.–Slaves are running away from Missouri, at the present time, in battalions. Three, belong to Mr. R. Meek, of Weston, ran away on Wednesday of last week–two of whom were afterward apprehended. They were making for the Plains. Fifteen made a stampede from Ray county, the week before, and took the line of their march for Iowa. Several were captured in Grundy county, but the larger number made good their escape. It would be a glorious thing for Missouri, if all her slaves should take it into their heads to run away. If she only knew it, they are one of the greatest drawbacks to her advancement and prosperity.–Alton, Ill. Tel. 

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              Underground Railroad. 

   PREBLE COUNTY STATION.–A friend writing from Preble county, May 23d, gives the following report from the Underground Railroad there:–"Twenty-four Fugitives passed through this county a few weeks ago, and their masters, in pursuit, were within fifteen feet of them, and yet failed to get them, owing to the timely attention of a friend of the slave who secreted them." 

   DARKE COUNTY STATION–Another friend, writing from Darke county, says:–"I was happy to see an article in your last paper, from Bibb's Voice of the Fugitive. I know a LITTLE about a certain stampede that traveled not a 100 miles from here–fine, robust looking fellows. They had a preacher along. He left his Bible in the neighborhood, and promised to get a Canadian one when he got home. I judge they would have fought like tigers, as they were well armed. I would not like to have attempted to stop them. 

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Change of Sentiment.  The Alton (Ill.) Telegraph, (printed on the spot where the martyr Lovejoy was shot for devotion to the anti-slavery cause,) speaking of the stampedes of slaves from the neighboring State, now boldly says: —

            It would be a glorious thing for Missouri, if all her slaves should take it into their heads to run away. If she only knew it, they are one of the greatest drawbacks to her advancement and prosperity.

            Matthews Brown, late U.S. Marshal for the middle district of Tennessee, is said to be a defaulter to an amount variously estimated at from $3,000 to $30,000. He has gone to California.

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NEGRO STAMPEDE. – Slaves are running away from Missouri, at the present time, in battalions. Three belonging to Mr. R Meek of Weston, ran away on Wednesday of last week— two of whom were afterwards apprehended. They were asking for the Plains. Fifteen made a stampede from Ray county, the week before, and took the line of their march for Iowa. Several were captured in Grundy country, but the larger number made good their escape. It would be a glorious thing for Missouri, if all her slaves should take into their heads to run away. If she only knew it, they are one of the greatest drawbacks to her advancement and prosperity. – Alton Ill) Telegraph.  

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                     Reminiscences. 

   At this period of time, when the "Conservative Whigs" of Georgia, emulating the hoarse vituperation of Mr. Toombs, are heaping obloquy upon the head of the President, it may not be amiss to detach ourselves for a season from the present, while we consider the character of the Administration to which they gave a recent, cordial, and continuous support. 

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                                               Slave Stampede. 

      The was a serious negro stampede from plantations sixty miles back of the river, in Kentucky, on Saturday night. Of eleven slaves who decamped, five succeeded in crossing the Ohio, a few miles below this city, yesterday. Their pursuers were in town last night, but learning that the fugitives had got twelve hours start, gave up the chase.  –  Com.  

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  NEGRO STAMPEDE.––We hear that on last Sunday night, four negroes belonging to Mr. Jackson McClain, ran off, and were tracked across the Ohio River   One of his women confessed to the burning of his residence, (a notice of which we made two weeks ago)  She said she was instigated to the deed by a negro fellow belonging to Wm. McClain. The negro man is now in jail, and the woman under arrest. 

   It is also rumored that on Monday night last, five or six more negroes missing from the same place, and belonging to Messrs. McClain––that they have been sometime laying in supplies, &c. It is probable that a part of the rumor is exaggerated.––Henderson Reporter.  

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                 From the Western Reserve Chronicle.

                           STOP 'EM!

                    BY AMINIDAB, THE ELDER.

Such a time was never seen;

    'Fugitives' from every station

Run unbridled through the land;

    Things are loose as all cration!

'Niggers' flit as shadows by;

    Compromises !--they don't mind 'em!

All mankind are breaking loose;

   Seems as if the purges had got 'em;

Helter-skelter--why the deuce

   Don't somebody go and stop 'em!

White men, too, stark, raving mad,

   Rear and pitch in party traces;

It's more than Government can do

   To keep them in their proper places.

Legislation aint no use,

    People won't be taught their duty,

But walk right off and act themselves,

   And say there's glory in't, and beauty!

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   Still another slave stampede came off a few miles below Maysville, on Wednesday night last. Five negroes – three of them very fair and delicate mulatto girls– succeed in crossing the river. All trace was lost a few miles back of Ripley, Brown county. – [Cin. Com., Monday. 

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   Still another slave stampede came off a few miles below Maysville, a few nights since. Five negroes––three of them very fair and delicate mulatto girls––succeeded in crossing the river. All trace was lost a few miles back of Ripley, Brown county.––Cincinnati Commercial. 

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Kidnapping Slaves for the South.

   Accounts of the running away of slaves from Boone county, Ky., have been quite frequent of late. The publication of these stampedes seems to have formed part of a bold game that has been played, and that with considerable success. Recent developments tend to the conclusion that the slaves started for Canada, but landed in New Orleans. It seems probable now that a Dr. Trundle, who has been regarded as an Abolitionist and suspected of aiding slaves to escape, has in fact been kidnapping them for the Southern market. The Cincinnati Enquirer of Friday states the fact of his arrest and conviction before an examining court, as follows:

   A gentleman answering to the same of Dr. T.J. Trundle, a resident of Union, Boone county, Kentucky, was, on Saturday last, arrested, charged with kidnapping sundry and various slaves owned by his neighbors. 

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SLAVE STAMPEDE. – The Cincinnati Commerical says there was a serious negro stampede from plantations sixty miles back of the river, in Kentucky, on Saturday night. Of eleven slaves who decamped. five succeeded in crossing the Ohio, a few miles below this city, yesterday. Their pursuers were in town last night, but learning that the fugitives had got twelve hours start, gave up the chase.  

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                       THE WESTERN FIELD.

                                              RICHMOND, Wayne Co., Ind.,

                                                    October 11, 1853.

DEAR FRIEND QUINCY:

   With your power of the pen, one could give some rather vivid sketches of 'Field-Hand' Anti-Slavery Experience, here in Indiana. Here is a fruitfulness of theme, exhaustless as the fertility of the prairies.  

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––The slaves in Mason county, Va., are becoming migratory in their habits–––Within the last fortnight, eight have made their escape to parts unknown. They were the property of Messrs. Beale, Bateman, Capehart and Mrs. Lewis

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––The slaves in Mason county, Virginia, are becoming migratory in their habits. Within the last fortnight eight have made their escape to parts unknown. They were the property of Messrs. Beale, Bateman, Capehart, and Mrs. Lewis. 

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A QUEER FUNERAL. – A correspondent of The Norwich (Conn,) Examiner writes:

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––A slave stampede came off a few miles below Maysville Ky., on Wednesday night last. Five negroes, three of them very fair and delicate mulatto girls––succeeded in crossing the river. All trace was lost a few miles back of Ripley, Brown county, O. 

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––The slaves in Mason County are becoming migratory in their habits. Within the last fortnight, eight have made their escape to parts unknown––being the property of Messrs. Beale, Bateman, Capehart and Mrs. Lewis. We presume owners in Mason are to share the fate of slave holders in this vicinity––have their property wrested from them without remedy or redress.––Parkersburgh Gazette.