Our database contains over 1,000 newspaper articles that specifically label a group escape as a "slave stampede" or some related variant, such as "negro stampede." Our document records also include hundreds of other types of primary sources and newspaper articles related to these stampedes but that do not contain the word itself. The map below provides a sample visualization of the newspaper coverage between 1856 and 1860 with clickable access to the various records inside our database. The detailed listing underneath includes records for all of the documents from the period 1847 to 1865, containing both transcripts and original images.

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Article

   HEAVY ROBBERY.––Stampede of Slaves.––On Saturday night a serious stampede of slaves occurred in this city. Five likely and valuable slaves made for parts unknown, one of them taking $1,500 of his master's money with him. One negro belonged to Mr. Geo. E. Sadler, one to Mr. R.H. Dickinson, one to Jones & Slater, and two others. The one belonging to Messrs. Jones & Slater enjoyed their fullest confidence. For a long time he had been taking deposits in bank for them.––Richmond (Va.) Post. 

Article

   A serious stampede of slaves took place from Richmond, Va., on Saturday night. Five likely and valuable slaves made off to parts unknown, one of them taking $1,500 of his master' money with him. The Richmond Dispatch says it is very evident from the number of slaves that have escaped within a short time past, that they have the assistance of abolition emissaries. The slaves of course cannot be supposed to run away from happiness "of their own motion." They are probably victims of misplaced confidence in the truth of a celebrated "rhetorical flourish."

Article

   Last Saturday night a stampede of slaves occurred in Richmond. Five likely and valuable slaves made off to parts unknown, one of them taking $1,500 of his master's money with him. The Richmond Dispatch says it is very evident from the number of slaves that have escaped within a short time past, that they have the assistance of abolition emissaries. 

Article

   On Saturday week a serious stampede of slaves occurred in Richmond, Va. Five likely and valuable slaves made off for parts unknown, one of them taking $1500 of his master's money with him. One negro belonged to Mr. George F. Sadler, one to Mr. R.H. Dickinson, one to Jones & Slater, and two others. The one belonging to Messrs. Jones & Slater enjoyed their fullest confidence. For a long time he had been making their deposits in the bank for them. 

Article

  On Saturday night a serious stampede of slaves occurred in Richmond. Five likely and valuable slaves made off to parts unknown, one of them taking with him $1,500 of his master's money.––The Richmond Dispatch says it is very evident, from the number of slaves that have escaped within a short time past, that they have the assistance of abolition emissaries. 

Article

  On Saturday night a serious stampede of slaves occurred in Richmond. Five likely and valuable slaves made off to parts unknown, one of them taking $1506 of his master's money with him. 

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   On Saturday night, a serious stampede of slaves occurred in Richmond, Va. Five likely and valuable slaves made off to parts unknown, one of them taking 1,500 of his master's money with him. The Richmond Dispatch says it is very evident, from the number of slaves that have escaped within a short time past, that they have the assistance of abolition emissaries. 

Article

  RUNAWAY NEGROES.––Members of the police report that six negroes––a man, woman and four children––belonging to Col. O'Fallon, ran away from his place above the city on Sunday night last. They are supposed to be on the way to Chicago. 

Article

   RUNAWAY NEGROES.––The agents of the Underground Railroad are unusually active this week. Besides six negroes belonging to Col. O'Fallon, three others were run off day before yesterday––one belonging to a gentleman in the city, and the others belonging to Mr. Coleman, who lives a few miles out on the Bonhomme road. 

Article

   Stampeding Slaves.–But one of the five slaves who left their owners of this city, about three weeks since, has been captured. On Tuesday, we learn through the Post, two more suddenly left–one of them having said to some of the children in his master's house that he had 'made it all right with a man, and was going to leave soon.'–Richmond Enquirer.

Article

    Life in Texas.

  Mr. G.W. Kendall, editor of the N.O. Picayune, who has retired to a sheep farm, in Texas, thus writes to this paper:

   "So far, although my place at the Post Oak Spring is within a few miles of where depredations have been committed, the Indians have been kind enough not to molest me; yet all my good fortune I attribute to the fat that at that particular locality I keep neither horses nor cattle, and I do not believe that the red rascals care much about sheep. I hope they may never get up an appetite for mutton. 

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TEXAS DANGERS.––Kendall of the Picayune writing from his ranche near San Antonio about the Indians, says:

   "But if they have not meddled with my sheep they have pestered me in another way; they have kept up a stampede among the men in my employ, and rendered some of them constantly uneasy.– One negro man in particular, who was at work cutting and splitting rails, was in such continual fear for several days that he declared he could not half work. To use his own words: 'Ebery lick I gib de tree wid de axe I hab to look round to see if some Injun don't gib me a lick in de back ob my head wid a tomahawk.' A man with such a scare upon him is of little service."

Article

       Slaves Captured

Article

                KANSAS.

   Amid the smoke and roar of the Kansas cannonade we fear that the Northern emigrant who is looking in that direction may find himself blinded and confused. Let us lift the curtain of fog and expose the real state of the case so far as it concerns him personally.

Article

                      For Frederick Douglass' Paper. 

THE FEARFUL ODDS AGAINST THE SLAVE

  [We heartily welcome (as our readers will) to our column the letter from our intelligent and right-hearted Correspondent––"A New York Merchant"––and we will thank him for further favors in the same direction–ED.]

Article

          Negro Stealing.

   Some more effective means than those furnished by law, must be adopted to secure slaveholders against the depredations which have been secretly carried on here from some time past, and now have become so flagrant as to attract very general attention, and demand very stringent preventives. Our facilities of inter-communication with Chicago, which is known to be a den of abolitionists and negro thieves, has doubtless emboldened and encouraged the philanthropists to make descents upon our kitchens and carry off our cooks; for it is notorious that a fugitive slave once safely housed in that place cannot be reclaimed except by resort to force, and that hundreds have, therefore, fled to Chicago sure of protection and sympathy. 

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   STAMPEDE.––On Sunday night some eight or ten slaves managed to cross the river into Illinois, but the authorities being on the alert, five of them were arrested and brought back. The others made good their escape. Thursday evening Judah Burrows, Mrs. Meachum and Isaac Breckenridge, three free negroes, were arrested on charge of assisting the runaways.––St. Louis Dem. 23d inst. 

Article

   Five runaway negroes were caught near Alton, Illinois, in charge of underground railroad agents last week, and taken back to St. Louis. The slaves in that region are making a regular stampede. 

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––A party of nine slaves undertook to leave St. Louis one night last week, under the guidance of the abolitionists. Five of them were captured, and the rest succeeded in getting off. It is to be regretted that their decoyers were not captured. 

Article

  STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––We copy the following from the Cincinnati Enquirer of Saturday:

Article

         Stampede of Slaves. 

We copy the following from the Cin. Enq. of Saturday:

Article

   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The negroes had been worked and paid no wages for many years on the plantation of Mr. Byrnes, of Bourbon County. They had been observed on several evenings to mysteriously absent themselves from their owner's premises, and on Wednesday night they were watched by a son of Mr. Byrnes, who saw them in a secluded spot, about half a mile from the house, in conversation with a couple of white men, with whom they were talking for upwards of an hour. Informing his father of this occurrence, the latter became alarmed, and despatched the son to a friend who resided ten miles from his plantation, for assistance; the negroes, in the meantime, suspecting something, stole off, and were followed by Mr. Byrnes, who, observing that they had bundles with them, attempted to prevent their leaving. This they resisted, and their master, in the melee, was severely handled, being left senseless on the sward.

Article

   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE AT NORFOLK.––On Saturday night last, says the Norfolk Herald, a party of five negroes undeterred by the recent failure of some other negroes in Norfolk to escape, disappeared. Strong suspicions were entertained that they were on board a Northern schooner which it was supposed, was detained in Hampton Roads by bad weather. Accordingly a strong party of citizens accompanied by two policemen, took boats and started after the vessel, but had not returned at a late hour Monday night. Two of the slaves belonged to Mr. T. Bottimore, one to L. Stosser, one to Messrs. Herman & Co., and one to Dr. Behan. 

   Last week, two slaves escaped from Mr. Seth March, who has gone to the North, to try and reclaim them. 

Article

   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The negroes had been worked and paid no wages for many years on the plantation of Mr. Byrnes, of Bourbon county. They had been observed on several evenings to mysteriously absent themselves from their owner's premises, and on Wednesday night they were watched by a son of Mr. Byrnes, who saw them in a secluded spot, about half a mile from the house, in conversation with a couple of white men, with whom they were talking for upward of an hour. Informing his father of this occurrence, the latter became alarmed, and dispatched the son to a friend who resided ten miles from his plantation, for assistance; the negroes, in the meantime, suspecting something, stole off, and were followed by Mr. Byrnes, who, observing that they had bundles with them, attempted to prevent their leaving. This they resisted, and their master, in the melee, was severely handled, being left senseless on the sward.

Article

STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The negroes had been worked and paid no wages for many years on the plantation of Mr. Byrnes, of Bourbon county. They had been observed on several evenings to mysteriously absent themselves from their owner's premises, and on Wednesday night they were watched by a son of Mr. Byrnes, who saw them in a secluded spot, about half a mile from the house, in conversation with a couple of white men, with whom they were talking for upward of an hour. Informing his father of this occurrence the latter became alarmed and dispatched the son to a friend, who resided ten miles from his plantation, for assistance; the negroes, meantime, suspecting something, stole off and were followed by Mr. Byrnes who, observing that they had bundles with them attempted to prevent their leaving. This they resisted and their master in the melee was severely handled, being left unconscious on the sward.

Article

   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The negroes had been worked and paid no wages for many years on the plantation of Mr. Byrnes, of Bourbon county. They had been observed on several evenings to mysteriously absent themselves from their owner's premises, and on Wednesday night they were watched by a son of Mr. Byrnes, who saw them in a secluded spot, about half a mile from the house, in conversation with a couple of white men, with whom they were talking for upward of an hour. Informing his father of this occurrence, the latter became alarmed, and dispatched the son to a friend who resided ten miles from his plantation, for assistance; the negroes, in the meantime, suspecting something, stole off, and were followed by Mr. Byrnes, who, observing that they had bundles with them, attempted to prevent their leaving. This they resisted, and their master, in the melee, was severely handled, being left senseless on the sward.

Article

   ANOTHER SLAVE STAMPEDE AT NORFOLK.––Saturday night lsat, says the Norfolk Herald, a party of five negroes, undeterred by the recent failure of some other negroes in Norfolk to escape, disappeared. Strong suspicions were entertained that they were on board a Northern schooner, which it was supposed was detained in Hampton Roads by bad weather. Accordingly a strong party of citizens, accompanied by two policemen, took boats and started after the vessel, but had not returned at a late hour Monday night. Two of the slaves belonged to Mr. T. Bottimore, one to L. Stosser, one to Messrs. Herman & Co., and one to Dr. Behan. 

   Last week, two slaves escaped from Mr. Seth March, who has gone to the North to try and reclaim them.––Richmond Dispatch.

Article

   Excitement at Norfolk––Stampede of Slaves.  Chas. H. Shield, Recorder, on Saturday was informed by one of our merchants that a drayman named Sales had called upon the captain of a northern vessel lying in our harbor, and had proposed to pay him a named sum to carry to the North a slave belonging to one of our citizens. Mr. Shield immediately made arrangements to prevent it, and with the constabulary force of the city, succeeded in capturing six fugitives, besides the drayman Sales, who are now in jail, and are undergoing an examination. Sundry developments have been made which show the existence of a society among the slaves here, which is organized for the purpose of aiding negroes in escaping from their owners.––Norfolk Beacon, June 12

Article

THE LATE SLAVE STAMPEDE IN NORFOLK – The Boston Transcript has seen a letter from some person in Norfolk, to a respectable colored man of that city, and from it makes the following extract: ' Dear Brother: It is with a heavy heart and wounded spirit I attempt to write these few lines to you. You must be in prayer for us;  we are in great trouble at this time. Sayles and Brown have got in trouble in attempting to send five friends North. Sayles made a bargain with Captian Goodrich, master of the schoon Grace Darling, of Boston, to carry them North for $25 a piece, and sent Brown to the captain to make arrangments to put them on board. The captain told Brown to have them on board at 11 o'clock Saturday night. Brown did so, and gave the captain $125. After he received the money, he said to Brown he had forgot something, and he took the boat and came ashore and got the police, and had the people put in jail.

Article

   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES. The negroes had been worked, and paid no wages for many years, on the plantation of Mr. Byrnes, of Bourbon Co. They had been observed, on several evenings, to mysteriously absent themselves from their owner's premises, and on Wednesday night they were watched by a son of Mr. Byrnes, who saw them in a secluded spot, about half a mile from the house, in conversation with two white men, with whom they were talking for upward of an hour. Informing his father of the occurrence, the latter became alarmed, and despatched the son to a friend, who resided ten miles from the plantation, for assistance; the negroes meantime, suspected something, stole off, and were followed by Mr. Byrnes, who, observing that they had bundles with them, attempted to prevent their leaving. This they resisted, and the master in the melee was severely handled, being left senseless on the sward.

Article

   THE ATTEMPTED STAMPEDE.––Capt. Goodridge, of the schooner Grace Darling, who, while at Norfolk a few weeks since gave information which led to the capture of five slaves who were on board his vessel with the intention of escaping, has made an explanation in Boston, to save him from the wrath of his abolition friends there. The Boston Transcript says: We have received from Capt. Goodridge of the schooner Grace Darling, a statement respecting his connection with the slave arrests made in Norfolk. He says that while at Norfolk on the 9th instant "a slave runner" came on board and requested him to take a single slave to Boston, offering to pay him $80 for the passage. But he refused to take the slave on board. In order, however, to inform himself the liabilities of the case, Captain Goodridge says he made inquiries of a Norfolk gentleman respecting the laws touching the question, stating to him the case.

Article

   ANOTHER STAMPEDE.   Another party of negroes, some fifteen in number, disappeared from Norfolk on Sunday morning last, and as soon as the fact became known, efforts were made to charter a steamer to go in pursuit of the Northern vessel which was supposed to have taken them on board. No steamer could be obtained, however; so, as soon as possible, some half dozen citizens, well armed and equipped, proceeded to Hampton, where the pilot-boat Reindeer, celebrated for speed, was chartered for the pursuit. The Argus says:––

Article

   COMPETITION––A rival procession, we understand, is to be got up to-morrow by a rival establishment. As we have no objection to such a manifestation of patriotism, so long as the procession does not interfere with our route, we cheerfully give place to the program in our paper, in order that the public may know what is going on. 

   The procession will form along the tow-path on the hole-path side, its left limb on Commercial street bridge and its right limb on the canal enlargement at Black Rock. The people who contemplate joining in the procession are especially desired not to wear the clothes they've got on now, but their best ones. The following will be the 

           ORDER OF PROCESSION

    GRAND MARSHAL OF THE DAY,

            on a roan horse.

State Superintendent of Schools, with a quill over his ear, 

        and a mammoth inkstand––on foot.

    Music––"Heavy stroke" Polka. 

  The uncommon members of the

Article

            HURRAH FOR SAM!

   We want to hold Sam up for a fight. We like Sam as an opponent much better than we do Greely and Seward's Northern hive of isms. We can and will whip them, it is true, but had as lief make war on a nest of vipers, or yellow jackets. Fighting such enemies is disagreeable, and victory inglorious.

            For it more stirs the blood to rouse the lion 

            Than to start the hare!

Article

   THE NEGRO IKE.––This negro, as our readers are aware, made his escape some three weeks since, and after eluding the vigilance of his pursuers for some time, was finally captured and brought back to town. He was then more heavily ironed, to insure his safer keeping. But it appears that his keeper, as he complained that the chain around his ancle caused it to swell and gave him great pain, was induced to remove it during the day, with the intention of replacing it at night. 

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  STAMPEDE.––Several slaves ran away from their owners, residing near Piedmont, Virginia, on Saturday night, 19th ult. They were six in number, belonging to Colonel Isaac Parsons, G.W. Blue, G.W. Washington, William Donaldson, and Isaac Baker. 

Article

   STAMPEDES.––Slaves along the line of Ohio are making tracks now in the direction of Canada quite numerously. Trimble county, just across the river, suffers an almost daily decrease of this sort of her population. The latest slope we hear of was by two mulattoes, man and woman, belonging to Dr. Wm. Ely, of Milton.––[Madison Banner.

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                      Stampedes.

   We doubt whether any county in the State suffers more serious loss from absconding negroes than Loudoun. Within the last twelve months the loss in this species of property has been immense. Even within the last fortnight we have heard of no less than 15 or 20 negroes who have thus made good their escape– four belonging to John M. Harrison, two to Joseph Lodge, one to Cornelius Vandoventer, (Mr. V. lost two others about three months ago,) one to Joseph Meade, one to Col. C. R. Dowell, one to Dr. F. Grady, three to Skinner, one to Mr.Butcher, and three to Mr. Stevenson. It behooves slave owners to keep a sharp look out; and ascertain, if possible, the cause of this wholesale stampede. – Loundon Democratic Mirror. 

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       HEAVY STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.

   The Leesburg (Virginia,) Mirror says. "We doubt whether any county in the State suffers more serious loss from absconding negroes than Loudon. Within the last twelve months the loss in this species of property has been immense.––Even within the last fortnight we have heard of no less than fifteen or twenty negroes who have made good their escape."

Article

   THE COLORED SCHOOL––STAMPEDE––It may not be generally known to our readers that a white man, named Patrick Farrell, has recently been placed as teacher in the colored school on Liberty street, by the Board of Education.––This action has caused no little excitement among the colored population who have been in the habit of sending their children to that school. At a meeting of the Board of Education last night, it was stated that there were only two scholars in attendance at that school on Friday last, and on Monday there were but three––the colored people refusing to send their children tone instructed by a white man––The Board we understand, was compelled to place a white man there, as no colored teacher could be obtained immediately, suitable for that station. The Clerk of the Board is now in correspondence with several from abroad, one of whom will undoubtedly be engaged shortly.

Article

   MORE NEGROES RUNNING OFF.––There appears to be a regular and constant stampede going on among the slave population in the city and county, not a night scarcely passing without one or more running away. On Saturday night a slave woman, the property of R.J. Ward, Esq., ran off. Mr. S. Chenoweth, of the county, lost one of his slaves at the same time, and Mrs. Lovering lost a woman servant and her two children, none of whom have since been heard of. In addition we learn that a gentleman residing a short distance from the city had two of his slaves to runaway on Friady night. 

   Here is a list of seven slaves that have disappeared from their owners since Friday night, and it is high time something was done to check the evil in our midst. 

Article

SLAVE STAMPEDE.  A correspondent of the Tribune telegraphs from Syracuse as follows:

     " As one of the incidents of a Free Convention, I may state that nine slaves were forwarded to Canada at 1 o'clock today. They were as fine a lot of chattels as ever ran from the land of the Free to the Queen's dominions. Five are men, two are women, and two girls. Four came from Norfolk, frightened away by the fever, and three or four from Washington. One of the men was a Charleston vessel, bound for Norfolk, but his owner declined to enter that port on account of the fever, and after extorting a promise that his slave would go back by land to Washington, he landed at Philadelphia; but strange to say the slave thought himself unsafe in that city of brotherly love and suddenly started for Syracuse. He is now north of the lake. Among of the martyrs here I noticed Mr. Patterson of the extinct Parkville Luminary. 

Article

  STAMPEDE.––A regular stampede of negroes was made from this neighborhood on Saturday night the 15 inst. They were ten in number––two belonged to the estate of the late Edward Ringgold; two women and two children to Col. Ricaud; two men to Jos. Ringgold, one to John S. Cosntable, and one to Henry A. Porter. They took with them three horses and a double carriage belonging to Edward Ringgold's estate, and a carriage belonging to John Greenwood.––Chestertown (Md.) News.

Article

  SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Twenty-one slaves escaped from the vicinity of Chestertown, Md., last week, aided by the agents of the underground railroad in the neighborhood. These escapades have become so frequent in Maryland that many of the owners in the Eastern Division of the State are filled with distrust, and purpose sending southward all those whom there is the least danger of losing in that way.––Phila. North American.

   This determination will interfere materially with the "underground railroad" arrangements of the editor of the Louisville Journal. He will doubtless protest against it vehemently, and again urge, as he did in 1844, that "all men have a right to liberty, no matter what color."

Article

   GOING IT IN STYLE.––We learn from the Charlestown (Md.) News that a regular stampede of negroes was made from the neighborhood of that place on the night of the 15th ult. They were ten in number. They took with them three horses and two double carriages belonging to their owners. This is a rather stylish affair, and from the number leaving it is indicative of the strong tendency of colored emigration to Slickdom. 

Article

   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Twenty-one slave escaped from the vicinity of Chestertown, Md., last week aided by the agents of the underground railroad in the neighborhood. These escapades have become so frequent in Maryland that many of the owners in the Eastern division of the State are filled with distrust, and purpose sending southward all those whom there is the least danger of losing in that way. 

Article

   MORE NEGROES RUNNING OFF.––There appears to be a regular and constant stampede going on among the slave population in the city and county, not a night scarcely passing without one or more running away. On Saturday night a slave woman, the property of R.J. Ward, Esq., ran off. Mr. S. Chenoweth, of the county, lost one of his slaves at the same time, and Mrs. Lovering lost a woman servant and her two children, none of whom have since been heard of. In addition, we learn that a gentleman residing a short distance from the city, had two of his slaves to run away on Friday night. 

   Here is a list of seven slaves that have disappeared from their owner since Friday night, and it is high time something was done to check the evil in our midst.––Louisville Courier, Sept. 25. 

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   Stampede.––A regular stampede of negroes was made from this neighborhood on Saturday night last. They were ten in number. They took with them three horses and a double carriages belonging to Ed. Ringgold's estate, and a carriage belonging to John Greenwood. They were all valuable negroes, and it is to be hoped will be recovered; up to the present time, however, nothing has been been heard of them.––Charlestown, Md. News, Sept. 20. 

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   Slave Stampede.––Twenty-one slave escaped from the vicinity of Chestertown, Md., last week aided by the agents of the underground railroad in the neighborhood. These escapades have become so frequent in Maryland that many of the owners in the Eastern division of the State are filled with distrust, and purpose sending Southward all those whom there is the least danger of losing in that way. 

Article

MORE NEGROES RUNNIING OFF. – There appears to be a regular stampede going on among the slave population in the city and country, not a night scarcely passing without more or less running away. On Saturday might [night], a slave woman, the property of R.J. Ward, Esq., ran off. Mr. S Chenoweth, of the country [county], lost one of his slaves at the same time, and Mrs. Lovering lost one woman servant and her two children, none of whom have since been heard of.

            In addition to the above, we learn that a gentleman residing a short distance from the city, had two of his slaves to run away on Friday night