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   Excitement at Norfolk––Stampede of Slaves.  Chas. H. Shield, Recorder, on Saturday was informed by one of our merchants that a drayman named Sales had called upon the captain of a northern vessel lying in our harbor, and had proposed to pay him a named sum to carry to the North a slave belonging to one of our citizens. Mr. Shield immediately made arrangements to prevent it, and with the constabulary force of the city, succeeded in capturing six fugitives, besides the drayman Sales, who are now in jail, and are undergoing an examination. Sundry developments have been made which show the existence of a society among the slaves here, which is organized for the purpose of aiding negroes in escaping from their owners.––Norfolk Beacon, June 12

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THE LATE SLAVE STAMPEDE IN NORFOLK – The Boston Transcript has seen a letter from some person in Norfolk, to a respectable colored man of that city, and from it makes the following extract: ' Dear Brother: It is with a heavy heart and wounded spirit I attempt to write these few lines to you. You must be in prayer for us;  we are in great trouble at this time. Sayles and Brown have got in trouble in attempting to send five friends North. Sayles made a bargain with Captian Goodrich, master of the schoon Grace Darling, of Boston, to carry them North for $25 a piece, and sent Brown to the captain to make arrangments to put them on board. The captain told Brown to have them on board at 11 o'clock Saturday night. Brown did so, and gave the captain $125. After he received the money, he said to Brown he had forgot something, and he took the boat and came ashore and got the police, and had the people put in jail.

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   THE ATTEMPTED STAMPEDE.––Capt. Goodridge, of the schooner Grace Darling, who, while at Norfolk a few weeks since gave information which led to the capture of five slaves who were on board his vessel with the intention of escaping, has made an explanation in Boston, to save him from the wrath of his abolition friends there. The Boston Transcript says: We have received from Capt. Goodridge of the schooner Grace Darling, a statement respecting his connection with the slave arrests made in Norfolk. He says that while at Norfolk on the 9th instant "a slave runner" came on board and requested him to take a single slave to Boston, offering to pay him $80 for the passage. But he refused to take the slave on board. In order, however, to inform himself the liabilities of the case, Captain Goodridge says he made inquiries of a Norfolk gentleman respecting the laws touching the question, stating to him the case.

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   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES. The negroes had been worked, and paid no wages for many years, on the plantation of Mr. Byrnes, of Bourbon Co. They had been observed, on several evenings, to mysteriously absent themselves from their owner's premises, and on Wednesday night they were watched by a son of Mr. Byrnes, who saw them in a secluded spot, about half a mile from the house, in conversation with two white men, with whom they were talking for upward of an hour. Informing his father of the occurrence, the latter became alarmed, and despatched the son to a friend, who resided ten miles from the plantation, for assistance; the negroes meantime, suspected something, stole off, and were followed by Mr. Byrnes, who, observing that they had bundles with them, attempted to prevent their leaving. This they resisted, and the master in the melee was severely handled, being left senseless on the sward.

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   ANOTHER STAMPEDE.   Another party of negroes, some fifteen in number, disappeared from Norfolk on Sunday morning last, and as soon as the fact became known, efforts were made to charter a steamer to go in pursuit of the Northern vessel which was supposed to have taken them on board. No steamer could be obtained, however; so, as soon as possible, some half dozen citizens, well armed and equipped, proceeded to Hampton, where the pilot-boat Reindeer, celebrated for speed, was chartered for the pursuit. The Argus says:––

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   COMPETITION––A rival procession, we understand, is to be got up to-morrow by a rival establishment. As we have no objection to such a manifestation of patriotism, so long as the procession does not interfere with our route, we cheerfully give place to the program in our paper, in order that the public may know what is going on. 

   The procession will form along the tow-path on the hole-path side, its left limb on Commercial street bridge and its right limb on the canal enlargement at Black Rock. The people who contemplate joining in the procession are especially desired not to wear the clothes they've got on now, but their best ones. The following will be the 

           ORDER OF PROCESSION

    GRAND MARSHAL OF THE DAY,

            on a roan horse.

State Superintendent of Schools, with a quill over his ear, 

        and a mammoth inkstand––on foot.

    Music––"Heavy stroke" Polka. 

  The uncommon members of the

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            HURRAH FOR SAM!

   We want to hold Sam up for a fight. We like Sam as an opponent much better than we do Greely and Seward's Northern hive of isms. We can and will whip them, it is true, but had as lief make war on a nest of vipers, or yellow jackets. Fighting such enemies is disagreeable, and victory inglorious.

            For it more stirs the blood to rouse the lion 

            Than to start the hare!

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   THE NEGRO IKE.––This negro, as our readers are aware, made his escape some three weeks since, and after eluding the vigilance of his pursuers for some time, was finally captured and brought back to town. He was then more heavily ironed, to insure his safer keeping. But it appears that his keeper, as he complained that the chain around his ancle caused it to swell and gave him great pain, was induced to remove it during the day, with the intention of replacing it at night. 

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  STAMPEDE.––Several slaves ran away from their owners, residing near Piedmont, Virginia, on Saturday night, 19th ult. They were six in number, belonging to Colonel Isaac Parsons, G.W. Blue, G.W. Washington, William Donaldson, and Isaac Baker. 

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   STAMPEDES.––Slaves along the line of Ohio are making tracks now in the direction of Canada quite numerously. Trimble county, just across the river, suffers an almost daily decrease of this sort of her population. The latest slope we hear of was by two mulattoes, man and woman, belonging to Dr. Wm. Ely, of Milton.––[Madison Banner.

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                      Stampedes.

   We doubt whether any county in the State suffers more serious loss from absconding negroes than Loudoun. Within the last twelve months the loss in this species of property has been immense. Even within the last fortnight we have heard of no less than 15 or 20 negroes who have thus made good their escape– four belonging to John M. Harrison, two to Joseph Lodge, one to Cornelius Vandoventer, (Mr. V. lost two others about three months ago,) one to Joseph Meade, one to Col. C. R. Dowell, one to Dr. F. Grady, three to Skinner, one to Mr.Butcher, and three to Mr. Stevenson. It behooves slave owners to keep a sharp look out; and ascertain, if possible, the cause of this wholesale stampede. – Loundon Democratic Mirror. 

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       HEAVY STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.

   The Leesburg (Virginia,) Mirror says. "We doubt whether any county in the State suffers more serious loss from absconding negroes than Loudon. Within the last twelve months the loss in this species of property has been immense.––Even within the last fortnight we have heard of no less than fifteen or twenty negroes who have made good their escape."

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   THE COLORED SCHOOL––STAMPEDE––It may not be generally known to our readers that a white man, named Patrick Farrell, has recently been placed as teacher in the colored school on Liberty street, by the Board of Education.––This action has caused no little excitement among the colored population who have been in the habit of sending their children to that school. At a meeting of the Board of Education last night, it was stated that there were only two scholars in attendance at that school on Friday last, and on Monday there were but three––the colored people refusing to send their children tone instructed by a white man––The Board we understand, was compelled to place a white man there, as no colored teacher could be obtained immediately, suitable for that station. The Clerk of the Board is now in correspondence with several from abroad, one of whom will undoubtedly be engaged shortly.

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   MORE NEGROES RUNNING OFF.––There appears to be a regular and constant stampede going on among the slave population in the city and county, not a night scarcely passing without one or more running away. On Saturday night a slave woman, the property of R.J. Ward, Esq., ran off. Mr. S. Chenoweth, of the county, lost one of his slaves at the same time, and Mrs. Lovering lost a woman servant and her two children, none of whom have since been heard of. In addition we learn that a gentleman residing a short distance from the city had two of his slaves to runaway on Friady night. 

   Here is a list of seven slaves that have disappeared from their owners since Friday night, and it is high time something was done to check the evil in our midst. 

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SLAVE STAMPEDE.  A correspondent of the Tribune telegraphs from Syracuse as follows:

     " As one of the incidents of a Free Convention, I may state that nine slaves were forwarded to Canada at 1 o'clock today. They were as fine a lot of chattels as ever ran from the land of the Free to the Queen's dominions. Five are men, two are women, and two girls. Four came from Norfolk, frightened away by the fever, and three or four from Washington. One of the men was a Charleston vessel, bound for Norfolk, but his owner declined to enter that port on account of the fever, and after extorting a promise that his slave would go back by land to Washington, he landed at Philadelphia; but strange to say the slave thought himself unsafe in that city of brotherly love and suddenly started for Syracuse. He is now north of the lake. Among of the martyrs here I noticed Mr. Patterson of the extinct Parkville Luminary. 

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  STAMPEDE.––A regular stampede of negroes was made from this neighborhood on Saturday night the 15 inst. They were ten in number––two belonged to the estate of the late Edward Ringgold; two women and two children to Col. Ricaud; two men to Jos. Ringgold, one to John S. Cosntable, and one to Henry A. Porter. They took with them three horses and a double carriage belonging to Edward Ringgold's estate, and a carriage belonging to John Greenwood.––Chestertown (Md.) News.

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Twenty-one slave escaped from the vicinity of Chestertown, Md., last week aided by the agents of the underground railroad in the neighborhood. These escapades have become so frequent in Maryland that many of the owners in the Eastern division of the State are filled with distrust, and purpose sending southward all those whom there is the least danger of losing in that way. 

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  SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Twenty-one slaves escaped from the vicinity of Chestertown, Md., last week, aided by the agents of the underground railroad in the neighborhood. These escapades have become so frequent in Maryland that many of the owners in the Eastern Division of the State are filled with distrust, and purpose sending southward all those whom there is the least danger of losing in that way.––Phila. North American.

   This determination will interfere materially with the "underground railroad" arrangements of the editor of the Louisville Journal. He will doubtless protest against it vehemently, and again urge, as he did in 1844, that "all men have a right to liberty, no matter what color."

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   GOING IT IN STYLE.––We learn from the Charlestown (Md.) News that a regular stampede of negroes was made from the neighborhood of that place on the night of the 15th ult. They were ten in number. They took with them three horses and two double carriages belonging to their owners. This is a rather stylish affair, and from the number leaving it is indicative of the strong tendency of colored emigration to Slickdom. 

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   MORE NEGROES RUNNING OFF.––There appears to be a regular and constant stampede going on among the slave population in the city and county, not a night scarcely passing without one or more running away. On Saturday night a slave woman, the property of R.J. Ward, Esq., ran off. Mr. S. Chenoweth, of the county, lost one of his slaves at the same time, and Mrs. Lovering lost a woman servant and her two children, none of whom have since been heard of. In addition, we learn that a gentleman residing a short distance from the city, had two of his slaves to run away on Friday night. 

   Here is a list of seven slaves that have disappeared from their owner since Friday night, and it is high time something was done to check the evil in our midst.––Louisville Courier, Sept. 25. 

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   Stampede.––A regular stampede of negroes was made from this neighborhood on Saturday night last. They were ten in number. They took with them three horses and a double carriages belonging to Ed. Ringgold's estate, and a carriage belonging to John Greenwood. They were all valuable negroes, and it is to be hoped will be recovered; up to the present time, however, nothing has been been heard of them.––Charlestown, Md. News, Sept. 20. 

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MORE NEGROES RUNNIING OFF. – There appears to be a regular stampede going on among the slave population in the city and country, not a night scarcely passing without more or less running away. On Saturday might [night], a slave woman, the property of R.J. Ward, Esq., ran off. Mr. S Chenoweth, of the country [county], lost one of his slaves at the same time, and Mrs. Lovering lost one woman servant and her two children, none of whom have since been heard of.

            In addition to the above, we learn that a gentleman residing a short distance from the city, had two of his slaves to run away on Friday night

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   Slave Stampede.––Twenty-one slave escaped from the vicinity of Chestertown, Md., last week aided by the agents of the underground railroad in the neighborhood. These escapades have become so frequent in Maryland that many of the owners in the Eastern division of the State are filled with distrust, and purpose sending Southward all those whom there is the least danger of losing in that way. 

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             SLAVERY IN VIRGINIA

     [Correspondence of the Evening Post.]

                  --------, Virginia, October, 1, 1855.

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...Four negroes, belonging to C. COX and R. MIDDLETON, ran away last week. They were captured by two citizens of Iowa, and yesterday returned to their owners. The $800 reward offered was promptly paid. Wonder why the free States of the East do not do like Iowa in this respect.      W. D. G.

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Slave Stampede. – Twenty- one slaves escaped from the vicinity of Charlestown, Md., last week, aided by the agents of the Underground Railroad in the neighborhood. These escapades have become so frequent in Maryland that many of the owners in the eastern division of the State are filled with distrust, and propose sending southward all those there is the least danger of losing in that way.

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   GOING IT IN STYLE.––We learn from the Charlestown (Md.) News that a regular stampede of negroes was made from the neighborhood of that place on the night of the 15th ult. They were ten in number. They took with them three horses and two double carriages belonging to their owners. This is a rather stylish affair, and from the number leaving it is indicative of the strong tendency of colored emigration to Slickdom. 

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Twenty-one slaves escaped from the vicinity of Charlestown, Md., last week, aided by the agents of the Underground Railroad in the neighborhood. These escapades have become so frequent in Maryland that many of the owners in the Eastern division of the State are filled with distrust, and propose sending southward all those there is the least danger of losing in that way.

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Twenty-one slaves escaped from the vicinity of Chestertown, Md., last week, aided by the agents of the underground railroad in the neighborhood. These escapades have become so frequent in Maryland that many of the owners in the Eastern division of the State are filled with distrust, and propose sending southward all those there is the least danger of losing in that way.

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––Twenty-one slaves escaped from the vicinity of Charlestown, Md., last week, aided by the agents of the Underground Railroad in the neighborhood. These escapades have become so frequent in Maryland that many of the owners in the Eastern division of the State are filled with distrust, and propose sending southward all those there is the least danger of losing in that way.

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         The Fever in Raymond.

                   RAYMOND, Oct. 21, 1855. 

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   Stampede of Negroes.––Seven negro men made their escape from Messrs. Jones & Slater's jail, in Locust alley, on Saturday night last, and are now, in all probability, endeavoring to effect their escape to the North. Five of these negroes had on handcuffs, and three of them were brought here from Bath county and sold, for having attempted to make their escape to a free State. Among the party is a fellow called Lee, who is so nearly white that he may attempt to pass himself off as the owner of the other six refugees. They effected their escape by breaking the lock to the door of the room in which they were confined. Their owners will give a liberal reward for their detection. 

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   Major Haynie, of Ouschita county, Ark., in a letter dated on the 10th inst. to the Van Buren Intelligencer, says that eleven negroes had run away from his immediate neighborhood, and that a general stampede among the negroes was apprehended, if not something worse. The people had become somewhat alarmed, and had adopted measures of precaution, and were using every exertion to capture the runaways. It was thought that there was a concert of action among the slaves in that vicinity. 

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             STAMPEDE.

   The Fairmount Virginian says that on Saturday night week, six slaves––four owned by Thos. Knotts, one by Absolom Knotts, and one by the estate of Jane Donnell––took six horses and made off for Pennsylvania. One of the party was captured and all the horses were recovered, but the other five slaves made good their escape. 

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   WHOLESALE STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.--We copy the following from the Fairmount True Virginian:

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                From the Fairmont True Virginian.  

                       Wholesale Stampede. 

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   FUGITIVE PIECES.––  Major Haynie, of Ouschita county, Ark., in a letter to the Van Buren Intelligencer, dated the 10th inst., says that 11 negroes escaped from his immediate neighborhood, and that a general stampede among the negroes was apprehended, if not something worse. The people had become somewhat alarmed, and had adopted measures of precaution, and were using every exertion to capture the runaways. It was thought that there was a concert of action among the slaves in that vicinity. 

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  Major Haynie, of Ouschita county, Ark., in a letter dated on the 10th inst., says that eleven negroes had runaway from his neighborhood, and a general stampede was apprehended. The planters had become somewhat alarmed, and had adopted measures of precaution, and were using every exertion to capture the runaways. It was thought that there was a concert of action among the slaves in that vicinity. 

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   Wholesale Stampede.--There have been but a few slaves in this (Marion) county at any time; and the number, already less than fifty probably, promises soon to be represented by a cipher. Our proximity to the Pennsylvania line, which, where it runs nearest us, is not more than twenty miles from Fairmount, renders the possession of slave property undesirable. On Saturday night last, six slaves started for Pennsylvania--two men and two women belonging to Thomas Knotts, one man belonging to Absalom Knotts, and one woman to the estate of Jane Doudell. Nor were they content to take themselves off only, but they took with them six horses belonging to different gentlemen of this county, besides various articles of clothing, bedding, &c. They were supplied, too, with fire-arms. In short, it would appear that they either possessed a good deal of forecast, or were prompted in the action by some agent of the 'underground railroad.'--Fairmount True Virginian. 

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SAFE AND SOUND IN CANADA. – The Charleston (Md.) News, of Sep. 20th informs it readers of a regular stampede of negroes from that neighborhood, a day or two previous. They were ten in number. It is said, "they are all valuable negroes; and " it is hoped" by the editor of the News, that they will be recovered. Up to the time of writing the article, he had not heard from them. 

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   Mr. J.L. Hutchinson of Union, Monroe county, lost $2,000 by a stampede of some slaves.

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.--The Norfolk Argus states that last week about eighteen negroes escaped from that city and Portsmouth. They were all young, and some of them skilful mechanics, valued at $2,000 each. Six were from Portsmouth. It is supposed that they left in some oyster vessel, loading perhaps in Tanner's creek, and bound for New York or some other Northern port. 

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       Negro Thief Arrested.

   A man named BEN. HORNE was arrested in Keytesville, on Friday night last, for Negro stealing. 

   This man made his appearance, in this county, about one year ago last spring. He became acquainted with the daughter of one of our most respected citizens; represented himself as an Alabamian; and his father resided in the above State, and aws well off. He made proposals of marriage to the young Lady. Being a stranger, some objection was raised; or at least some intimation was made that he should make good his assertions, in regard to his property. 

   About the first of September 1854, Horne left this neighborhood, on a visit, as he said, to Alabama. He was absent two months. He returned having in his possession two Negro men; representing that he started from home with four Negroes, two of whom had died on the trip up the Mississippi, with yellow fever. 

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   Negro Stampede.––Six slaves made their escape from this city last Saturday night, by the underground railroad, and are now, no doubt, on their way to the North. 

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                           Slave Stampede.

        The Norfolk Argus states that last week about eighteen negroes escaped from that city and Portsmouth. They were all young, and some of them skillful mechanics, valued at $2,000 each. Six were from Portsmouth. It is supposed that they left in some oyster vessel, loading perhaps in Tanner's creek, and bound from New York or some other Northern port. 

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           A Wholesale Stampede.

   Eighteen slaves, of both sexes, left Norfolk last week, and it is supposed have been conveyed to the North by emissaries of the abolitionists. Almost every week more or less escape from that city by similar means. 

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UNPRECEDENTED STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.

   The Argus of Thursday last, learns that a party of about eighteens laves, of both sexes, left Norfolk and Portsmouth last week for some northern port. 

   About a dozen are owned in Norfolk, and the balance on the other side of the river. They are mostly young, and some of them valuable mechanics valued at from fifteen hundred to two thousand dollars each. As to color and quality, they comprise almost every shade, from the brightest and politest mulatto to the real native, greasy African black, with his thick, red lips, white teeth, flat nose and long heels. It is supposed they left in some oyster vessel, loading, perhaps in Tanner's Creek, and bound to New York or some other port north of Mason & Dixon's line. 

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     Fugitive Slave Police.

   In order to establish such a police as would effectually break up the escape of negroes in coasting craft, the State should purchase one or more small and fast sailing vessels, and station them near the Capes. The expense would be inconsiderable, compared with the saving. One stampede of negroes, such as has lately occurred here in Richmond, costs more than the purchase, manning and support of two such vessels for five years. 

   A river police would be useless, for no examination of vessels, at any point short of the Capes, can afford an entire safeguard against the escape of slave property. 

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   UNPRECEDENTED STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The Norfolk Argus states that a party of about eighteen slaves of both sexes, left Norfolk and Portsmouth last week for some northern port.––About a dozen are owned in Norfolk, and the balance on the other side of the river. They are mostly young, and some of them valuable mechanics, valued at from $1,500 to $2,000 each. 

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       The Underground Railroad.

   Not the least important of all the great Railroad enterprises which are rapidly, but almost imperceptibly, effecting great changes in the condition of the country and in the social and political relations of the States towards each other, is that mysterious organization called the "Underground Railroad." As its managers publish no annual or quarterly statements of its operations, and its stock is not being recognized by the Bulls and Bears of Wall-street, it is not half so much talked about as many other Roads which are not, in truth, of half so much importance.