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[Telegraphed for the Baltimore Sun]

The Fugitive Slave Stampede––Bank Rumor. &c.

PITTSBURG, Sept. 25, P.M.––Upwards of 140 fugitive slaves have left the city and Alleghany since last Saturday, for Canada.  They were all armed to the teeth, and were determined to die before they would surrender. Several Southerners, suspected as being slave hunters, are now here.

It is rumored that the North Western Bank of Virginia is in an unsound condition.

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               Pittsburgh, Sept. 24.

   A Negro Stampede.––Great excitement prevails here among our colored population, on account of the recent passage of the fugitive slave bill. A party of seventeen negroes, who had formerly been slaves, started on Saturday, armed to the teeth with pistols and bowie knives, en route for Canada. Small parties are leaving daily.

 

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            Consequences of further Agitation.

   After the adjournment of Congress the Union will be agitated with a fierce conflict. Assault and defense, crimination and retort, will involve the country in a war of opinion which has probably had no parallel. The opposing principles of fanaticism will co-operate in this disgraceful strife. These positive and negative forces will be united to destroy the Union. We have, however, no doubt that the love of the Union will prove too strong for the combined influence of its enemies. The power of popular opinion will quench the torch that fanaticism would apply to the Temple of Liberty. For ourselves, we shall stand for the Union and the Constitution. We believe that "the people of the United States," who formed the Constitution, can alone abrogate it. 

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From the Charleston Courier. –– By Telegraph.

New York. Sept. 30.––The Cotton market was firm on the 30th The sales reached 2000 bales at full prices. Lard 3/8; Grain drooping.

Both Houses of Congress adjourned sine die at noon to-day. Nothing of moment was done at the close of the session. The members are scattering in all directions.

The first slave, under the fugitive law, was successfully arrested in N. York on Friday, and brought home. The fugitive negroes are leaving Pennsylvania, N. York, and other free States for Canada. There is a regular stampede among them.

There was a frost in Baltimore Monday night, and weather was cold enough to form ice, which will do injury to the Tobacco crop.

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How Mr. Fillmore's Slave Catching Bill is received by his Constituents.––Duty of the general rising of the People.

A REGULAR STAMPEDE.––The passage of the Fugitive Slave bill by Congress has caused great commotion among our colored population. On Saturday a large number of them left the city for Canada, we believe. Some of our first hotels are left very bare of servants by this sudden movement. We had no idea that Pittsburgh was the home of so many fugitives, and feel sorry that a law has been passed by Congress that either drives them out of the Union entirely or back to perpetual slavery.––

[Pittsburgh Chron., 23d.

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Consequences of further Agitation

After the adjournment of Congress the Union will be agitated with a fierce conflict. Assault and defence, crimination and retort, will involve the country in a war of opinion which has probably no parallel. The opposing principles of fanaticism will co-operate in this disgraceful strife. These positive and negative forces will be united to destroy the Union.––We have, however, no doubt that the love of the Union will prove too strong for the combined influence of its enemies. The power of popular opinion will quench the torch that fanaticism would apply to the Temple of Liberty. –– For ourselves, we shall stand for the Union and the Constitution. We believe that "the people of the United States," who formed the Constitution, can alone abrogate it. 

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A BIG BATCH OF RUNAWAYS.--We find the following despatch in the Delta of Friday: 

   "One hundred and forty fugitive slaves left Pittsburg on Saturday, for Canada--well armed--resolved to die rather than be captured."

   Such is the announcement we find in the Vicksburg Sentinel, and the Disunion papers throughout the State will doubtless think the despatch a Godsend. Whether the Mississippian will again head it, with the joyous exclamation--"The work goes bravely on"--remains to be seen. Strange that these disunionists should rejoice in every attack upon the South! But so it is. Every thing that tends to weaken the Union; every rub the South receives, is to them a source of gratification, inasmuch as they think that thereby the probable existence of the Union is shortened. 

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   But our northern brethren, who are the friends of the constitution--and, let us add, of the Union--must be aware of the importance as well as the justice of suppressing this feeling and carrying out the law. The South have demanded such a law. It constitutes a part of one great system of compromise, which is calculated to restore the peace of the Union. Should that law be wantonly violated by mob law, it will make the South much more discontented than before it passed. No one can tell the excitement which may arise, or the mischiefs it may produce. We sincerely hope that every case of arrest may go off as quietly as those in New York and in Harrisburg; and then the South may be able to save its property, and the North will be rid of the most troublesome portion of its population. The Albany Argus justly remarks upon the case in New York:

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   THE SLAVE EXCITEMENT.––Our telegraphic despatches have already alluded to a stampede of the fugitive slaves at Pittsburgh. A despatch from that city, dated the 24th ult., says:

   There is some excitement here among the colored people, owing to the passage by Congress of the Fugitive Slave bill, and the power it gives to the slave owner to enter the free States and take possession of his runaway property where he finds it. Many of them are preparing to leave for Canada, in order to escape from those that they expect will soon be in pursuit of them. On Saturday, a large number roof them left the city, and some of the first hotels are left very bare of servants by this sudden movement. Many have gone who were never suspected of being fugitives until the passage of this bill, and many others are preparing to join in the general stampede. 

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Arrest of a Slave––The first arrest under the new fugitive slave law was made at New York on the 27th ult., and the slave has been brought home. The fugitive negroes are leaving Pennsylvania, New York, and other free States. There is a regular stampede among them in many places.

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          RECAPTURE OF FUGITIVE SLAVES.

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            FROM WASHINGTON.

 (Correspondence of the Louisville Courier.)

 The effect of the fugitive slave bill on the negroes at the North––Arrests under its provisions––Appropriations for Custom Houses, &c., in the West––Attack of the Union upon Col. Humphrey Marshall, for his exposure of Ritchie's Rascality––Appointment of L.D. Stickney as Mail Agent, &c., &c.

                     WASHINGTON, Oct. 2, P.M.

   W.N. Haldeman––

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   ANOTHER EVIDENCE OF THE TRUE FEELINGS ON THE PART ON THE NORTH.––The telegraphic despatches of the New Orleans Delta, of the 25th ult., from Pittsburg, mention that one hundred and forty fugitive slaves left that place for Canada, well armed and resolved to die rather than be re-captured. These black rascals were of course armed and supplied with the means of escape by those Northern men, who were said, by some of the speakers at the Submission meeting in this place, a few days since, to be sound on the slavery question. Did the history of the world ever present an instance of so patient a people, under grievous wrongs, as those of the South? England would she deluged the earth with blood and set the world by the ears for one tithe the causes the South has had with the North, upon this solitary question.

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   STAMPEDE AMONG THE NEGROES.––There was considerable excitement recently among the negroes, owing to the passage of the Fugitive Slave Bill. A large number of them have left the city for Canada, and some of the first hotels were left very bare of servants by this sudden movement. Many, says a Pittsburg paper, have gone who were never suspected of being fugitives until the passage of the bill, and many others are preparing to join in the general stampede. The Pittsburg Gazette has the following:

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          FUGITIVE SLAVES.

   The passage of the fugitive slave bill created quite a stampede among that class of persons and their friends, in the northern cities. We observe a number of fugitives left Pittsburg immediately upon the receipt of the news, and others were making active preparations to leave for Canada. Meetings have been held in Boston and New York, composed of free negroes, fugitive slaves and a few abolitionists, at which no little indignation was manifested.––A telegraphic dispatch from Boston, dated the 2d, says:–

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   We learn that the first arrest of a runaway slave under the new Fugitive Slave Bill was recently made in New York. He was brought home. He belonged to Baltimore, and had been gone two years. 

   We learn also that there is a general stampede of runaway negroes form New York and Pennsylvania. They are cutting off for Canada.––One hundred and forty left Pittsburg at one time. 

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The first slave under the fugitive slave law, was successfully arrested in New York on Friday, and brought home. The fugitive negroes are leaving Pennsylvania, New York, and other free States, for Canada.-- There is a regular stampede among them. 

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   "STAMPEDE."––The southern papers are beginning to make themselves merry on the subject of fugitive slaves. The Charleston Sun, under the above caption, says, "from our northern exchanges we perceive that the passage of the fugitive slave bill has had some effect in getting up a stampede among the negroes near the southern border of the state of Pennsylvania. We are inclined to the opinion, however, that it has mostly existence in the minds of northern editors who are desirous of humbugging the south into the belief that the bill is having some effect. This stampede, we believe, will be the greatest effect of that bill, viz: to run our fugitive slaves farther from us. As to the practicability of putting into operation any of the features of the bill, we do not think that northern feelings and prejudices will admit of it."

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     A REGULAR STAMPEDE.––The passage of the Fugitive Slave bill by Congress, caused the great commotion among our colored population. On Saturday a large number of them left the city for Canada, we believe. Some of our first hotels are left very bare of servants by this sudden movement. We had no idea that Pittsburgh was the home of so many fugitives, and feel sorry that a law has been passed by Congress that either drives them out of the Union entirely, or back to perpetual slavery. 

        [Pittsburg Chronicle 23d.

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   The passage of the fugitive slave bill has produced a stampede among the negroes In Pittsburgh for Canada. Some of the papers of that city are highly indignant of the loss of these citizens of Pennsylvania. 

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   FRED. DOUGLASS IN DANGER.--Since the passage, by Congress, of the fugitive slave bill, which allows the owners of sales to take their runaway negroes wherever they can be found in the United States, there has been quite a panic among this description of colored people at the North. At Pittsburg, Pennsylvania--the paradise of runaway negroes--there was a general stampede last week. Nearly all the waiters in the hotels have fled to Canada.-- On Sunday, thirty fled; on Monday, forty; on Tuesday, fifty; on Wednesday, thirty; and up to last accounts the total number who had gone to Canada would not fall short of three hundred. They went in large bodies, armed with pistols and bowie knives, determined to die, rather than be captured. 

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          FROM WASHINGTON.

[CORRESPONDENCE OF THE GEORGIA TELEGRAPH]

                                WASHINGTON, Oct. 8, 1850. 

The Past-time of the Administration--The next Presidency--the Abolitionists and their Proceedings--a few words about them, etc.

   There are not now a half dozen members of Congress in this city, and they would be away if they had time to reach their homes and return by the first day of the next session of Congress. 

   The Administration, for want of something better to do, have been engaged in turning democratic clerks out of office, and appointing whigs to fill their places. A two cent business, and only mentioned as an instance of the smallness of those who administer the Government. 

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     The Fugitive Slave Bill. 

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We understand that a gang of abolitionists were routed in Stewart county, a few days since. One out of the four was caught and ridden on a rail, the rest saved themselves by a stampede. These devils should be scourged from the South wherever found, for the first offence, and for the second, hung to the nearest tree,–Columbus (Ga.) Times.

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 Public Sentiment in the North. 

   Nearly every mail that reaches us brings convincing proof that the Albany Atlas was in error when it asserted that the sentiment of opposition to the fugitive slave law was "universal" in the non-slaveholding States. Gradually the great body of the people is moving; the voice of reason, duty, and patriotism is becoming audible amidst the din of that "abolition rub-a-dub," to which Mr. Webster so graphically alluded in his last speech in the Senate. We can readily understand how even the best inclined persons might have mistaken the first signs of public opinion on this exciting subject.

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       From the Washington Aurora. 

A stampede.-- The people of this district being excluded from all participation in the common property of the U. States, by a recent Act of Congress, have wisely determined to compell all free colord persons to emigrate to their brethren of the North. We understand 700 have lately left here for New York, Philadelphia, and Boston, and about 800 more are making preparations to remove, as soon as the ensuing Legislature adjourns, unless they succeed in their petition to that body to be recognized as State property, receiving support and protection in consideration of their services on the public works. 

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    A Tempest in a Tea-Pot.

      A NEW PROPHET!

    The Passage of the Fugitive Slave Bill, and the prompt and successful manner in which it has been carried into execution, seem to have stirred up Runawayniggerdom, to its lowest depths. The "fugitives" are holding numerous indignation meetings at the North, and denouncing the law as an infraction of their rights? Many of them are making a stampede for Canada, while others seem determined to resist the law, hoping to receive the aid of their free soil sympathizers. 

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                 From the American Whig Review. 

    Our political friends will find in the present number an article illustrating the further policy of Great Britain, as developed by the conduct of her agents in Central America. 

    In another article we have given a general view of her commercial policy, explaining, in very simple language, and by popular illustrations, some things supposed to be peculiarly dark and difficult. 

    Our developments of British arrogance and assumption have excited a violent jealousy in the minds of some persons, as we discover by the vituperations of a certain, or rather uncertain, portion of the public press. We can only say that we shall suffer no opportunity to escape us of laying correct information before our readers, not only the public proceedings, but of public insults and contempts politicly cast upon us by the present British Ministry, miscalled "Whig," and their agents, employed or volunteer. 

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                                     A Stampede. 

   On Saturday last, three citizens of Kentucky made an effort to arrest as a fugitive a colored man named Hubbard Cable, who for some time past, has been teamster for Mr. Martin Ryan, of this place. They made careful inquiry, before they proceeded on their mission, as to the feelings of our people and received the assurance that no opposition would be made to any legal course they might take. The leader of the three, was Mr. Wm. Read, the other two were named William McMillen and Ferdinand Kirkham. 

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The Fugitive Slave Bill.

The New York Herald, after its own peculiar way, presents the following true history of the passage and fate of the Fugitive Law. Its effects upon Northern politics and politicians are not at all exaggerated. 

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A Stampede.-- Between one hundred and fifty and two hundred negro slaves, belonging to Indians of the Seminole and Creek Nations, have eloped from their masters and are on their way to Mexico, and will no doubt endeavor to follow the route taken by Wild Cat, the Seminole chief, last summer, who conducted about 60 runaway slaves from this nation across the Rio Grande, somewhere near Presido de Rio Grande. Fifty dollars per head is offered as a reward for their arrest. 

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                             From the True Democrat. 

   Canada West--Colored People--their Situation. 

  Messrs. Editors:––The undersigned was appointed an agent by the friends of the "Fugitive Slaves" in Randolph, Marlboro'. Ravetma, and Wyndham, to visit and report the wants of the fugitives in Canada West, and to administer to them such aid as was committed to his care, by the friends of the slave in the above named places. 

   There are in Canada West probably not far from 3,000 fugitives. It is impossible to arrive at the exact number, as they are daily arriving, many of them having been hurried away from the Free (?) States, where they had accumulated some property; have sold their possessions at a great sacrifice, and are in need at present. 

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ANOTHER FUGITIVE SLAVE CASE. 

The Arrest of a Fugitive Slave--His Forcible Rescue by a Black Mob--The Law Trampled Under Foot. 

   Our city was again thrown into something of a commotion, on Saturday last, by the arrest of a fugitive slave named Shadrach, who has acted for several months in the capacity of a waiter in the Cornhill Coffee House. He is said to belong to Mr. John de Bree, of Norfolk, Va., from whom he escaped on the 3d of May, 1850. 

   The arrest was made by Deputy Marshal Riley, who officiated for Marshal Devens, who is now at Washington. Mr. Riley, in company with the informer and officer Warren, proceeded to the Coffee House about 11 o'clock, where they called for refreshments, which were served by the slave. On his appearance he was arrested and forthwith taken into custody. 

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   The Fugitive Slave Case in Boston.

   An extraordinary amount of latent patriotism, it appears to us, has been liberated by this simple case. We are awaiting with some impatience to hear from the South on the subject; and, in the mean time, congratulate that respectable but somewhat excitable section of the confederacy on "something having turned up," at last, which will diver their indignation, for a time at least, from the misdeeds of poor little Vermont! Theoretical "nullification in Vermont," they will think, is not so bad as practical nullification in Massachusetts. 

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      A Chapter from the History of an Administration. 

             From the Washington Republic. 

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   Stampedes of slaves, from Mason and Nicholas counties, Ky. seem of common occurrence. 

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                 Profit and Loss.

   Here is an account of the flight of more slaves in one week, from two counties in Kentucky, than have been recovered under the Fugitive slave law in all the Northern States in eight months. 

   NEGRO STAMPEDE.--The Maysville Post Boy of the 2d inst., says:

   During the past week, a leave-taking fever has prevailed among the slaves in this section. On Sunday night, a woman and three children the property of F.M. Wheedon of our city, left their owners in Lewis.–eight belonging to Mrs. Eliza Sheppard, two to Chas. Wood, and the remainder, owners names not ascertained. From Nicholas several have also departed from freedom during the past few days. 

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                      A Slave Case.

                 Mays Lick, Ky., Wednesday, May 7, 1851. 

To the Editor of the Tribune:

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   Negro Stampede.––The Maysville (Ky.) Post Boy, of the 21st April, gives an account of twenty-two negroes, belonging to different persons in that section, who ran off to a free State during the week. 

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   NEGRO STAMPEDE--The Maysville (Ky.) Post Boy of the 2nd inst. says:

   "During the last week a leave-taking fever has prevailed among the slaves in this section. On Sunday night a woman and three children, the property of F.M. Wheeden of our city, left. On Wednesday night, nineteen in one gang left their owners in Lewis; eight belonging to Mrs. Eliza Shepperd, two to Charles Wood, and the remainder, owners names not ascertained. From Nicholas, several have also departed for freedom during the past few days."

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    AN ATTEMPT TO KIDNAP DEFEATED. 

   A colored man, named Moses Johnson , was arrested on the third instant, in Chicago, as a fugitive slave, and brought before Commissioner Meecker. Mr. Peck appeared on behalf of the claimant, a person residing in Missouri; Messrs. Manene and Larned appeared for the defendant. The case produced great excitement throughout the city, and was under trial for two days.

At 2 o’clock, on the 6th, the Commissioner delivered his opinion, occupying more than an hour, and decided the following material points:

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    Stampede Frustrated.––Several slaves in the neighborhood of Lagrange, Texas, recently made arrangements to run away and proposed to Mexico. They were to have left on a Monday, but one of them, in order to have an early start, made tracks on Sunday. He was pursued, and when taken confessed the whole plan. He stated that the negroes were all supplied with guns and ammunition, and were prepared to force their way. 

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   A number of negroes in the vicinity of Lagrange, lately had their preparations completed for a trip to Mexico. They were provided with guns, ammunition, etc., to force their way through any opposition which they might encounter. Fortunately they were detected in time to have their contemplated stampede effectually arrested. 

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   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The papers of the Eastern Shore record the sudden disappearance of a number of slaves. Three men, belonging to Mr. Wm. H. De Courcey, of Wye Neck, Queen Anne's county, ran off on the night of the 14th inst; he offers $500 for their arrest. Three servants belonging, one to Mr. John W. Battie, one to Mr. John Harris, and the other to Mr. Spedden Orem, of Talbot county, disappeared on Saturday night last, taking with them two horses belonging to Morris O. Colston, esq., and one to Mr. Battie. Mr. Colston pursued, but succeeded only in recovering the horses. 

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   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.––The papers of the Eastern Shore record the sudden disappearance of a number of slaves. Three men, belonging to Mr. Wm. H. De Courcey, of Wye Neck, Queen Anne's county, ran off on the night of the 14th inst; he offers $500 for their arrest. Three servants belonging, one to Mr. John W. Battle, one to Mr. John Harris, and the other to Mr. Spedden Orem, of Talbot county, disappeared on Saturday night last, taking with them two horses belonging to Morris G. Colston, esq., and one to Mr. Battle. Mr. Colston pursued, but succeeded only in recovering the horses.––Balt. Clipper. 

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   STAMPEDE OF SLAVES.--The papers of the eastern shore record the sudden disappearance of a number of slaves. Three men belonging to Mr. Wm. H. DeCourcey, of Wye Neck, Queen Anne's County, ran off on the night of the 14th inst.; he offers $500 for their arrest. Three servants, belonging, one to Mr. John W. Battie, one to Mr. John Harris, and the other to Mr. Spedden Orem, of Talbot County, disappeared on Saturday night last, taking with them two horses belonging to Morris G. Colston, and one to Mr. Battie. Mr. Colston pursued, but succeeded only in recovering the horses.--Baltimore Clipper. 

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   "The North American is so hard up for ammunition that it has been compelled to resort to a repetition of the slanders of the Harrisburg American, to eke out its sorry slanders against BIGLER; and in doing this, is forced to endorse a publication of the alleged private conversation of Hon. Geo. W. Woodward, at Harrisburg!"–Pennsylvanian.

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Slave Stampede.-- Some ninety slaves are said to have run away from Kanawha county, a few days ago. 

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE STORY EXPLODED. – We see, by the Kanawha Republican, that the only foundation for the alleged stampede of ninety negroes from Kanawha was the removal of about that number of slaves from Kanawha, under the care of their masters, to New Orleans.

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   SLAVE STAMPEDE.––We see by the Kanowha [Kanawah] (Va.) Republican that the only foundation for the alleged stampede of ninety negroes from Kanawha, was the removal of about that number of slaves from Kanawha, under the care of their masters, to New Orleans.