These records cover more than 300 recorded escapes from Missouri --including more than two dozen newspaper-identified stampedes-- during the period between 1840 and 1865. The total number of freedom seekers documented here exceeds 1,500 people, with more than half from the wartime period. Newspaper articles and runaway advertisements provide the sources for these escape episodes. In all cases, we have indicated the proper source citation and in any case involving stampedes, we have also provided the full-text transcription of the actual newspaper coverage.

View All Escapes // 1840s // 1850s // 1860s

Displaying 201 - 250 of 474

A 23-year-old enslaved man named Henry left his enslaver's estate at Columbia Bottom, north of St. Louis in St. Ferdinand township, under the guise of visiting his family in the city. When Henry never returned to Columbia Bottom, his enslaver, Henry W. Carter, advertised $100 for his recapture. 
Start Date:
Saturday, June 28, 1856
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Tuesday, July 1, 1856, a roughly 20-year-old enslaved man named George escaped from Bonhomme, a short distance southwest of St. Louis. His enslaver, Abraham S. Fisher, advertised a $50 reward for his recapture. 

Start Date:
Tuesday, July 1, 1856
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

Around July 10, 1856, three enslaved people escaped from the residence of prominent St. Louis citizen John O'Fallon. Apparently never recaptured, their escape may have been linked to the flight of eight enslaved people from slaveholder Robert Wash just days later. On Monday night, July 14, 1856, an enslaved family--a husband and wife, their three sons, two daughters and the wife's sister, escaped from slaveholder Robert Wash near St. Louis.

Start Date:
Thursday, July 10, 1856
Numbers:
11
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Freedom

On Friday night, July 25, 1856, an enslaved man and an enslaved woman, who local newspapers did not identify by name, escaped from slaveholder John Muellberger's farm. The St. Louis Democrat reported that the two freedom seekers had reached Illinois. 

Start Date:
Friday, July 25, 1856
Numbers:
2
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Sunday night, August 10, 1856, seven enslaved people escaped from Parkersburg, Virginia. Their ultimate fate remains unknown. 

Start Date:
Sunday, August 10, 1856
Numbers:
7
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

A 16-year-old enslaved woman named Nancy escaped from her enslaver, W.T. Christy of St. Louis, with the help of a white man named William Smith. The pair were captured on Illinois soil, four miles from Alton. Nancy was re-enslaved, and Smith was sentenced to five years in prison.

Start Date:
Friday, August 15, 1856
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Recapture/Death

On Sunday, August 31, 1856, five enslaved people, whose names were not recorded, escaped from Jamestown, Kentucky into Ohio. Their fate remains unknown. 

Start Date:
Sunday, August 31, 1856
Numbers:
5
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Sunday night, August 31, 1856, a group of freedom seekers escaped from multiple slaveholders in Hopkins county, Kentucky. There were anywhere from 15 to 20 freedom seekers involved in the "stampede." One enslaved man from Tennessee was captured while attempting to join the group, but the fate of the others remains unknown. 

 

Start Date:
Sunday, August 31, 1856
Numbers:
20
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Recapture/Death, Mixed, Unknown

Sometime in mid-September 1856, an enslaved railroad worker commandeered an engine near Sommerville, Tennessee. With "seven or eight other" enslaved people on board, they attempted to escape. Newspapers treated it with satire, labelling it a "novel negro stampede," but for the freedom seekers it meant the difference between a life of liberty or bondage. The group abandoned the engine some 12 miles outside of Sommerville, and fled to the woods.

Start Date:
Wednesday, September 10, 1856
Numbers:
9
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Mixed

On Sunday night, September 14, 1856, eleven enslaved people--eight adults and three children--escaped from Loudon county, Virginia. Their ultimate fate remains unknown. 

Start Date:
Sunday, September 14, 1856
Numbers:
11
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Sunday evening, September 28, 1856, an enslaved man named Westley (or West) escaped from the steamboad L.M. Kennett, while it was docked at Wilkinson's Landing along the Mississippi river south of St. Louis. His enslavers, T.H. Larkin & Co., advertised a $50 reward for his recapture. 

Start Date:
Sunday, September 28, 1856
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

Sometime in the fall of 1856, a "proposed negro stampede" was thwarted in Hallettsville, in Lavaca county, Texas. Several white men "of doubtful character" were alleged to have been involved in planning and aiding the escape plot. Placed on trial, a local jury returned a verdict of not guilty, but nonetheless required the men to leave the county in 48 hours. The number of enslaved Texans who attempted to escape was not specified. 

Start Date:
Wednesday, October 15, 1856
Numbers:
10
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Recapture/Death

On Saturday, October 18, 1856, two enslaved men, 24-year-old Antoine and Philip, aged between 35-40 years, escaped from Ste. Genevieve, Missouri. Their enslavers, B.T. Beauvais and Eloy Lecompte, respectively, each advertised separate $200 rewards for their individual recapture.

Start Date:
Saturday, October 18, 1856
Numbers:
2
Outcome:
Unknown

On Sunday night, October 19, 1856, a free African American preacher named Isaac McDaniel rescued from slavery his wife, Mary, their five-year-old son Daniel, and another family enslaved by Hannibal slaveholder John Bush: 32-year-old Anthony, his wife, 34-year-old Eliza, and their children, eight-year-old Margaret and six-year-old Lewis. Taking Bush's horse and carriage, McDaniel led the two families of freedom seekers out of slavery.

Start Date:
Sunday, October 19, 1856
Numbers:
6
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

Sometime in early November 1856, two groups of freedom seekers, numbering 26 enslaved people, escaped from northern Kentucky. Fourteen freedom seekers left Kenton county, while another 12 escaped from near Maysville, Kentucky. Their ultimate fate remains unknown.  

Start Date:
Wednesday, November 5, 1856
Numbers:
26
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

Reports described a stampede of free African Americans from Murfreesboro, Tennessee. Local whites had become angered by free Blacks' "pernicious influence among the slave population."

Start Date:
Sunday, November 30, 1856
Numbers:
20
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Monday, January 5, 1857, a roughly 42-year-old enslaved man named Charles escaped in St. Louis from his enslaver, Francis J. Smith (the executor of deceased slaveholder Thomas Horine's estate), when Smith was traveling to Jefferson City. Smith advertised a $100 reward for Charles's recapture. 

Start Date:
Monday, January 5, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Saturday, January 10, 1857, a 17-year-old enslaved man named Ben escaped from Bonhomme, near St. Louis. His enslaver, Henry Tyler, advertised a $100 reward for his recapture. 

Start Date:
Saturday, January 10, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Saturday night, January 10, 1857, eleven enslaved people escaped from a Richmond slave pen. Authorities expressed confidence they could recapture the freedom seekers, but their ultimate fate remains unknown. 

Start Date:
Saturday, January 10, 1857
Numbers:
11
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

A roughly 22-year-old enslaved man named Washington, or Wash, escaped from Berger, MIssouri in Franklin county, on Saturday morning, January 18, 1857. His enslaver, Theodore Bates, offered a $200 reward for his recapture.

Start Date:
Sunday, January 18, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Friday, January 23, 1857, an enslaved 13-14 year old enslaved boy named Jack ran away from St. Louis. His enslaver, J.F. Neves, advertised a $50 reward for his recapture.

Start Date:
Friday, January 23, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Monday morning, January 26, 1857, an enslaved man named Lewis escaped St. Louis via the Ohio & Mississippi railroad, riding the trains to Cairo, Illinois. His enslaver, Barney Lynch, offered a $200 reward for his return.

Start Date:
Monday, January 26, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

A roughly 24-year-old enslaved man who went by the names of Mose or Keys escaped from Kirkwood, southwest of St. Louis, around 5pm on January 31, 1857. His enslaver, Thomas Sappington, advertised a $100 reward for his recapture. 

Start Date:
Saturday, January 31, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

In early February 1857, the frozen Ohio river provided a natural conduit to freedom for many enslaved Kentuckians. A family of six escaped from Covington, Kentucky during the first week of February, though a Cincinnati journalist noted that "numerous other stampedes have taken place along the line of the river." 

Start Date:
Sunday, February 1, 1857
Numbers:
20
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Sunday, March 8, 1857, a 21-year-old enslaved man named Jack ran away from Franklin county, Missouri. His enslaver, James B. Lewis, advertised a $500 reward for his recapture.

Start Date:
Sunday, March 8, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

Sometime in March 1857, an enslaved man and child escaped from near Columbia in Boone county, Missouri. The editors of the Hannibal Messenger wondered aloud if "they ran off, were persuaded off, or stolen," but suspected that their flight had something to do with a spate of recent horse thefts, and concluded they had been "decoyed off."

Start Date:
Sunday, March 15, 1857
Numbers:
2
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Saturday, April 11, 1857, five enslaved people escaped from the vicinity of Frederick, Maryland. Two freedom seekers fled from enslaver Abdiel Unkefer in Libertytown, Marlyand, and another three people escaped from slaveholding lawyer Dawson Hammond near the town of New Market. Their fate remains unknown. 

 

Start Date:
Saturday, April 11, 1857
Numbers:
5
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Wednesday, June 17, 1857, a freedman named Louis Liggens led his five enslaved children, William, Louis, Mary Jane, Sarah Ann and Ned out of St. Louis and towards freedom. Outraged at "such base ingratitude," the children's enslaver, John Finney, advertised a $700 reward for their recapture. 

Start Date:
Friday, April 17, 1857
Numbers:
5
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Sunday morning, April 19, 1857, an enslaved man named Step escaped from Labadie station along the Pacific Railroad. His enslaver, F.J. North, advertised a $100 reward for Step's recapture. 

Start Date:
Sunday, April 19, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

Sometime during the weekend of May 16-17, 1857, an approximately 28-year-old enslaved man named Glasgow Emory escaped from St. Louis. His enslaver, H. Prouhet, advertised a $500 reward for his recapture.

Start Date:
Sunday, May 17, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Saturday, May 30, 1857, five enslaved people escaped from Hagerstown, Maryland via horse, carriage, and buggy. They traveled to Chambersburg, where they apparently boarded the trains of the Cumberland Valley Railroad for Harrisburg. Although an initial report suggested the freedom seekers had been captured at Chambersburg, subsequent news items clarified that only the horses and carriages had been found. 

Start Date:
Saturday, May 30, 1857
Numbers:
5
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

Four escapees from near Iron Mountain, Missouri were tracked down near Sparta, Illinois by a posse of white Missourians. One of the escapees was killed in the violent confrontation, and another escapee was killed by two Illinoisans (who were later acquitted on charges of manslaughter in 1861). Only one freedom seeker successfully eluded recapture. 

Start Date:
Monday, June 1, 1857
Numbers:
4
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Mixed

Throughout May 1857, some 31 enslaved people escaped from the vicinity of Fort Adams, Mississippi. Their names, or mode of escape, were not recorded. It remains unclear if any of the freedom seekers were recaptured. 

Start Date:
Monday, June 1, 1857
Numbers:
31
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Saturday, June 13, 1857, an enslaved man who was not identified by name, aged about 23 years, escaped from Valle Mines in Franklin county. His enslaver, Bennett Thurmond, advertised a $300 reward for his recapture.

Start Date:
Saturday, June 13, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Sunday, June 14, 1857, an approximately 28-year-old enslaved man named Charlie set out from Potosi in Washington county, Missouri. His enslaver, Michael Flynn, offered a $100 reward for his recapture.

Start Date:
Sunday, June 14, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

An approximately 26-year-old enslaved woman named Le Anne escaped from the steamboat Alonzo Child. Her enslaver, Capt. J.B. Holland, suspected that Le Anne may have sought refuge with free husband, Coibbs, and offered a $100 reward for her recapture.

Start Date:
Wednesday, July 1, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

An 18-year-old enslaved woman named Julia escaped from her enslaver near St. Louis. A $150 reward was advertised for her recapture. 

Start Date:
Wednesday, July 1, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Wednesday morning, July 8, 1857, a roughly 25-year-old enslaved man named Albert escaped from a farm near Glasgow, Missouri. His enslaver, June Williams, offered a $250 reward for Albert's recapture.

Start Date:
Wednesday, July 8, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

Around 12 enslaved people escaped from eastern Missouri, taking refuge in Cairo, Illinois. When white Missourians arrived in pursuit, black residents resisted with force, shielding the freedom seekers from recapture. 

Start Date:
Wednesday, July 15, 1857
Numbers:
12
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Freedom

Around July 15, 1857, a 15-year-old enslaved teenager named Dick escaped from Warrenton, Missouri. His enslaver, Walter Dix, advertised a $200 reward for Dick's recapture.

Start Date:
Wednesday, July 15, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown
A 35-year-old enslaved man named Edgar Canton originally escaped from Shelbyville, Missouri in the summer of 1857 (some sources claim fall of 1856), but was recaptured by U.S. officers near Springfield, Illinois in early 1860 and brought before federal commissioner Stephen Corneau for a rendition hearing under the 1850 Fugitive Slave Law. Corneau remanded Canton to the custody of his enslaver, George Dickinson.  However, during his return to St. Louis, Canton managed to attack one of his guards with a razor.  He was disarmed, however, and Canton was quickly sold.  However,  Canton somehow escaped again one month later, this time for good.
Start Date:
Wednesday, July 15, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Mixed

On Friday morning, July 17, 1857, an 22-year-old enslaved woman named Rachel escaped from a residence located three miles north of St. Louis. Her enslaver, J.M. Brown, offered a $100 reward for Rachel's recapture. It was later raised to $300, with the admonishment that Rachel "was raised in Macon county, Mo., and has expressed some anxiety to go home."

Start Date:
Friday, July 17, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Sunday night, July 19, 1857, a roughly 35-year-old enslaved man named Felix escaped. His enslaver, John W. Gibson, believed that Felix was "lurking about in the neighborhood to avoid labor," commonly known as lying out, and advertised a $200 reward for Felix's recapture. 

Start Date:
Sunday, July 19, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Sunday, August 16, 1857, a roughly 22-year-old enslaved man named Lewis escaped from a farm near St. Louis. His enslaver, R. Bircher, advertised a $100 reward for his recapture.

Start Date:
Sunday, August 16, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown
On Thursday night, August 27, 1857, four enslaved people, two men John, Anderson, and a woman Venus and her child, escaped from slaveholder Dr. R.H. Griffith in Hannibal, Missouri. The same night, an enslaved man, who was not named, escaped from a slaveholder named Snively in Hannibal. Days later, four of the five freedom seekers were recaptured by Jordan Hyde and Neal Fouks "in the prairie bottom opposite this city" after "a short scuffle."
Start Date:
Thursday, August 27, 1857
Numbers:
5
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Mixed

On Sunday night, August 30, 1857, a roughly 27-year-old enslaved woman named Lucy escaped from St. Louis. Her enslaver, Leroy Kingsland, advertised a $100 reward for her recapture.

Start Date:
Sunday, August 30, 1857
Numbers:
1
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

Late August 1857 saw a "general stampede" of enslaved people from Dover, Delaware. Although their names were not recorded, reports indicate that a number of enslaved people escaped from multiple slaveholders.

Start Date:
Monday, August 31, 1857
Numbers:
10
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

On Tuesday, September 1, 1857, a 28-year-old enslaved woman named Priscilla escaped along with her 9-year-old son Moses. Their enslaver, Charles R. Hall, offered a $150 reward for their recapture. 

Start Date:
Tuesday, September 1, 1857
Numbers:
2
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

In early September 1857, some 12 enslaved people escaped from Norfolk, Virginia. Their names were not recorded, though multiple newspapers across the country reported on yet "another negro stampede." 

Start Date:
Tuesday, September 1, 1857
Numbers:
12
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown

Three enslaved people, a 34-year-old man named Jack, a 28-year-old woman named Maria, and a 13-year-old child named Nelson, escaped from near St. Louis, and were reportedly armed. Their enslaver, C.L. Hunt, advertised a $1,000 reward for their recapture. 

Start Date:
Tuesday, September 1, 1857
Numbers:
3
Starting Point:
Outcome:
Unknown